ICC president Mustafa Kamal quits over World Cup trophy snub

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Cricket Council Controversy: Mustafa Kamal.

Mustafa Kamal resigned as president of the International Cricket Council on Wednesday, saying he had been prevented from presenting the World Cup trophy after claiming one of the matches was fixed.

– #Quiz360: WIN a group paintball session at Zayed Sports City
– #360View: Daniel Vettori – the underrated giant of world cricket
– Shoaib Mohammad: Pakistan’s Cricket World Cup ratings

Kamal, a Bangladeshi national, told reporters he had been ordered to apologise for the incendiary claim that his country’s World Cup quarter-final defeat to India was “pre-arranged”.

He said after the match last month that there was “no quality in the umpiring”, casting a shadow over an otherwise successful tournament and earning a sharp rebuke from ICC chief executive David Richardson.

He later complained that he had been deprived of his “right” as ICC president to present the trophy to the winners, Australia.

Instead that honour went to India’s Narayanaswami Srinivasan, who took over as ICC chairman last year and who was booed at the ceremony. 

“I resign right at this moment. I am no longer ICC president,” Kamal told reporters at the airport in Dhaka, where he arrived from Singapore on Wednesday.

“The main reason for my resignation is that I can’t work with those who can act unconstitutionally and unlawfully.”

An ICC spokesman told AFP by phone the world body had “not received any information” about Kamal’s resignation, refusing to comment further.

A spokesman for Kamal said he had sent a resignation letter to Richardson.

Kamal’s position has been largely ceremonial since Srinivasan took office as ICC chairman last year.

On Wednesday, Kamal launched an extraordinary attack on the Indian national, calling him “rotten” and “controversial” and suggesting the ICC could stand for “Indian Cricket Council”.

“I feel bad even to mention his name,” he said. “If that man is in charge of cricket, how will cricket run?”

Kamal, who is a government minister in Bangladesh, had earlier threatened to quit over the umpiring of the quarter final.

He said he had been told he would only be allowed to present the trophy if we withdrew his claim of bias.

“I will not withdraw the statement because it was the sentiment of 160 million people,” he said, referring to the population of Bangladesh.

“Then they told me, if you can’t submit an apology or withdraw the statement, you can’t present the trophy,” Kamal said.

Last month’s match was the first time Bangladesh had reached the World Cup quarter-finals and emotions in the cricket-mad country ran high after their 109-run defeat by India.

Fans openly wept and an effigy of umpire Aleem Dar, who is from rival nation Pakistan, was burnt in the street.

Kamal said he had told ICC bosses it would be “unconstitutional” to allow anyone else to hand over the trophy.

“In that match, I had the right to give the trophy to the champions,” he said.

“Only the ICC president has the right to present the trophy in ICC world events.”

Most popular

Daniel Vettori: The underrated giant

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Vettori's 300 wickets in 442 international Test and ODI matches make him a Black Cap legend.

After New Zealand lost the World Cup final to Australia, captain Brendon McCullum said that his team will not make any retirement announcements for at least a couple of days in order to allow the Australians to bask in the glory of their success.

– #Quiz360: WIN a group paintball session at ZSC

– Sport360’s Cricket World Cup XI

– #CWC15: Left armers prove to be right for the Australians

And almost right on cue, Daniel Vettori announced his retirement yesterday, bringing to an end a stellar career that saw him become the most capped Kiwi player and successful bowler. The contrast with Michael Clarke’s own headline stealing declaration on the eve of the final is hard to ignore.

But then that’s always been the case with the understated genius of Vettori. With more than 300 wickets each in both Tests and ODIs, plus the experience of 442 international matches, Vettori is a true legend of New Zealand cricket. But his legacy goes beyond his country. He was widely considered as one of the greatest left-arm spinners of all time before a series of back and Achilles injuries put serious question marks over his career.

Vettori had been out of the game for so long, it was feared he might have lost the art of spin along the way as well. But with a home World Cup looming, the former captain decided to bite the bullet and put his fitness issues aside for a shot at glory. And he nearly pulled it off.

The 36-year-old was in a league of his own among slow bowlers at the World Cup. He picked up 15 scalps from nine games, but most importantly, kept up the pressure by giving away just 4.04 runs an over throughout the event – the second best economy rate behind Mitchell Starc. 

Spinners generally did well but many were aided by the responsive wickets and huge grounds of Australia. Vettori, however, played all but one of his nine games on the small and generally unresponsive pitches in New Zealand. Playing in odd-shaped venues with not much help for the slow bowlers can unsettle the very best. But the left-armer took that as a challenge and made maximum use of change of pace, angles and variations to keep the batsmen in check. 

Having an economy of close to four in a World Cup where 400 was breached three times and 300 all too regularly is a testament to his mastery over the art. But let’s not forget his ability with the bat. 

In Test matches, he has scored six centuries. For a lower order batsman, that is a considerable number. It’s a shame not many hail him as one the very best all-rounders, as Vettori is only the third player to have the double of 4000 runs and 300 wickets in Tests. His all-round skills are exceptional, but it’s his control over the ball which made him special.

There are many who feel Indian spinner Bishan Singh Bedi was the best left-arm slow bowler to have played the game as he bowled with a beautiful loop and got appreciable turn and bounce. But Vettori survived and even flourished in an era when top edges sail over the boundary ropes and wickets get flatter by the day. To fight so many challenges, come back for one last shot at glory and then come up with the goods under intense pressure is remarkable.

In the quarter-final against the West Indies, Vettori came up with a piece of magic. Marlon Samuels hit an upper cut to third man where Vettori leapt at the last possible moment, stuck his left hand out and latched on to the ball with minimal fuss. 
The catch summed Vettori up perfectly – cool, collected and so typically understated.

Most popular

Do you agree with Sport360's #CWC15 XI?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Here are our picks for the World Cup XI.

As the dust settles on one of the most exciting Cricket World Cups in history, we pick our very own team of the tournament. Check out the ICC’s very own official team of the tournament and tell us what you think of the two sides and share with us your own best XI by using #360CWCXI.

– #360debate: Was this Australia's best World Cup performance?

– #CWC15: Left armers prove to be right for the Australians

– Shoaib Mohammad: Pakistan's Cricket World Cup ratings
– GALLERY: ICC Cricket World Cup Team of the Tournament

David Warner
Matches: 8; Runs: 345; Highest: 178; Average: 49.28; Strike rate: 120.20

A difficult decision, but we opted for Warner instead of Martin Guptill, because the Kiwi’s tournament was essentially defined by one sensational knock (although he did make another century in the series), but Warner also made 178 in one outing and has a much more impressive overall record despite Guptil being the tournament’s top run scorer.

Brendon McCullum (Captain)
Matches: 9; Runs: 328; Highest: 77; Average: 36.44; Strike rate: 188.50

There have been aggressive captains before, but McCullum takes it to an altogether different level. The only thing better than his shrewd strategy-making on the field is his brilliant man-management – be it his own team members, opposition, media, fans or any other stakeholder of the game. A class act both on and off the pitch.

Steve Smith
Matches: 8; Runs: 402; Highest: 105; Average: 67; Strike rate: 91.57

The young Australia is not only enjoying an amazing run of form, he also seems to be saving at least 15-20 runs with his electric brand of fielding. His century against India in the semi-finals and the half-century in the final shows the always-fidgety Sydneysider is a big-match player.

Kumar Sangakkara
Matches: 7; Runs: 541; Highest: 124; Average: 108.2; Strike rate: 105.87

For someone who was playing his last tournament as an ODI player, the 37-year-old lit up the stage with a world record four consecutive centuries. He is still physically fit and runs his singles as hard as ever. Not only that, Sangakkara remains a shrewd observer of the game.

AB De Villiers
Matches: 8; Runs: 482; Highest: 162*; Average: 96.4; Strike rate: 144.31

Can you imagine naming a best Test, ODI or T20 eleven without the South African captain? He already owned the fastest 50 and 100 in the 50-over format before the World Cup, and added the fastest 150 against to the list on the world’s biggest stage. To cap it all off, he is one of the best fielders in the world.

Glenn Maxwell
Matches: 8; Runs: 324; Highest: 102; Average: 64.80; Strike rate: 182.02

Glenn Maxwell is Australia’s answer to AB de Villiers. As they say, no boundary is safe when Maxi is at the crease. The 26-year-old has such amazing hand-eye coordination, at times it seemseven he does not what kind of shot he will eventually end up playing.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (WK)
Matches: 8; Catches: 15; Runs: 237; Highest: 85*; Average: 59.25; Strike rate: 102.15

Even though it is felt that the Indian captain is coming to the end of his ODI career after calling it a day in Tests, he still remains one of the best readers of the game who can script extraordinary things due to his awareness of everything going on in the field.

Ravichandran Ashwin
Matches: 8; Overs 77; Wickets: 13; Runs: 330; Best: 4-25; Average: 25.38; Economy: 4.38

The most difficult choice of all. Daniel Vettori and Imran Tahir were the other contenders, but Ashwin gets the nod because of Vettori’s physical issues and the fact that he is a better batsman and more experienced on the international stage than Tahir.

Wahab Riaz
Matches: 7; Overs 66.1; Wickets: 16; Runs: 368; Best: 4-45; Average: 23.00; Economy: 5.56

The 29-year-old from Lahore provided the most absorbing period of the World Cup when he was engaged in a blood-curdling battle with Australia’s Shane Watson in the quarter-final. Even before that Riaz bowled some fantastic spells and consistently bowled above 145kmph.

Mitchell Starc
Matches: 8; Overs 63.5; Wickets: 22; Runs: 330; Best: 6-28; Average: 10.18; Economy: 3.98

Highest wicket-taker of the tournament, the best economy rate and the lowest average in the World Cup among all leading bowlers. The 29-year-old Aussie Player of the Tournament is the first player we chose to feature in our eleven due to his superb performances that lead to his side’s victory on home soil.

Trent Boult
Matches: 9; Overs 85; Wickets: 22; Runs: 371; Best: 5-27; Average: 16.86; Economy: 4.36

Except for the match against England, he delivered in every match. The 25-year-old from Rotorua has established himself as the world’s most lethal swing bowler in this tournament. He may not have the same searing pace as the Aussie quicks but his skill and control are unrivalled.

Most popular