Sri Lanka send Jeffrey Vandersay back from West Indies tour over improper conduct

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Sri Lanka's Jeffrey Vandersay.

Sri Lanka on Saturday recalled leg spinner Jeffrey Vandersay from the tour of the West Indies tour over conduct that violated “contractual obligations”, the country’s cricket board said.

The 28-year-old was included in the 17-member squad for the three Test series against the West Indies, the third match of which stated in Barbados on Saturday.

“Vandersay, who toured West Indies with the national team is sent back to Sri Lanka owing to his conduct, which amounts to breach of contractual obligations,” the board said in a statement.

It adds to the woes of the Sri Lankan team who started the third and final Test without regular skipper Dinesh Chandimal.

Chandimal was handed a one-match ban over ball tampering charges during the second Test that ended in a draw. Chandimal was given the ban after being spotted applying saliva to the ball with a sweet in his mouth.

The ICC on Friday dismissed Chandimal’s subsequent appeal. Suranga Lakmal is leading Sri Lanka in Chandimal’s absence.

Most popular

England spinner Adil Rashid says even a full-strength Australia ODI team wouldn't have made any difference

David Clough 23/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Adil Rashid is confident England would still be on the verge of whitewashing Australia 5-0 even if the tourists had been able to pick their full-strength team.

England need just one more victory at Old Trafford on Sunday to complete a one-day international clean sweep against their Ashes opponents, who are minus at least five key players.

Three of Australia’s first-choice seamers are injured, while former captain Steve Smith and David Warner are serving year-long suspensions for their part in the ball-tampering controversy in South Africa earlier in the year.

England are on the verge of what would be their first 5-0 victory over Australia in any format, since the age-old rivalry began almost 140 years ago.

The record-breaking form of Eoin Morgan’s world number ones undoubtedly comes with a caveat for some, because of Australia’s key absences.

Rashid, however, does not agree – having been part of a team which also won 4-1 down under at the start of the year, when England began exacting a little white-ball revenge for their 4-0 Ashes hammering.

Asked if this summer’s series might have been very different against a full-strength Australia line-up, he said: “No, I don’t think so.

“Those players were still playing in Australia – Steve Smith, (David) Warner, (Pat) Cummins, (Josh) Hazlewood. They were still playing. We won 4-1 there, and here it’s 4-0, so I think it’s very similar.”

Six months on, England are careful not to get ahead of themselves by focusing too early on what would be a proud and historic achievement.

“It would be (good),” Rashid said at the prospect of a whitewash. “But we’re not talking about that at the moment.

“Once the game’s done, if you’ve got the whitewash, then you’ve got things to talk about.”

He is England’s leading wicket-taker in the series, with 11 so far and 19 in tandem with fellow spinner Moeen Ali.

The dry environs of Old Trafford offer the prospect of more – and although the leg-spinner is not crowing about that yet either, he does acknowledge previous matches can get in batsmen’s heads.

“We can’t take it lightly but once know you have one over (a team), you’ve got (a few) wickets, you know they’ll always have that in the back of their minds.

“So when they do bat against certain spin bowlers they might play a bit more hesitantly.

“They won’t be themselves, and that’s how you get the edge over the batsmen.”

Most popular

Record-breaking batting stepping stones in Jason Roy's 2019 World Cup journey

David Clough 22/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Jason Roy has become a habitual record-breaker for England but insists he is merely taking “stepping stones” to the moments that count – in next year’s World Cup.

Roy admits the “heartbreak” of being dropped from last year’s Champions Trophy semi-final, and then having to watch England be knocked out by Pakistan, remains a driving force to put things right in 50-over cricket’s biggest global tournament.

Along the way, he is compiling a remarkable string of brilliant performances at the top of the order. The 27-year-old has recovered from some patchy form which followed his national-record highest one-day international score of 180 in Melbourne at the start of the year.

Roy’s latest century at Chester-le-Street, his second in three innings against Australia either side of making 82 in England’s new world-best 481 for six at Trent Bridge, helped the hosts ease past a ground-record target of 310 for eight and move to the verge of a first 5-0 ODI whitewash of their Ashes rivals.

For good measure, he and Jonny Bairstow took their century opening partnerships to five – more than any other England pair in the short format.

Roy hopes more than anything, though, that all those heroics prove appropriate milestones to a maiden World Cup title for England.

“The records are fantastic obviously, and it’s a nice reward for the hard work we have put in,” he said.

“(But) our main aim is to make sure these are just stepping stones to the bigger picture – the World Cup.

“It’s great breaking all the records and stuff – but at the end of the day, the aim is to have this confidence come the World Cup.”

Roy’s England career has so far brought him 89 white-ball caps, and six ODI hundreds, but it has been far from seamless.

He completed a sequence of nine innings without a half-century when he was bowled for a second-ball duck last week by Billy Stanlake on his home ground at The Oval in the first match of a series which will conclude at Old Trafford on Sunday.

Self-doubt never kicked in, though.

“It was interesting hearing that I was struggling,” said Roy.

“I got a couple of 40s, and obviously those aren’t good enough as an opener.

“I felt pretty good in New Zealand, (but) just didn’t get a big score … I just wasn’t kicking on.”

He is disinclined these days to look even further back too often, to the misery of being left out of England’s team in Cardiff a year ago.

Nonetheless, the chastening experience – individually and collectively – continues to focus England’s minds on converting their world number one status into global silverware.

“As a kid I did look up to the Champions Trophy and wanted to play well,” he added.

“But I got dropped – and that was heartbreaking for me – so going away and putting in the hard work, I know I’m going to get my rewards. Let’s hope this time next year I’m at the World Cup, I’m in decent form and can win some games for the team.”

Most popular