Cricket history created as triplets take the field for the Netherlands vs UAE

Ashish Peter 19/07/2017
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On Tuesday, while the United Arab Emirates took on the Netherlands in the first of the three match ODI series, a very interesting record was set.

Cricket has had its share of twins representing their nations in international or first class cricket. The legendary Waugh brothers of Australia come to mind when one thinks of twins representing the same team in international cricket.

When the two teams took the field at the VRA Cricket Ground in Amstelveen, cricket historians and statisticians were scrambling to register a moment which will end up in cricket trivias for a long time to come.

Three Zulfiqars aged 20 each – Asad, Sikander and Saqib featured in the Dutch batting line up as skipper Peter Borren won the toss and elected to bat. One could be forgiven to assume that ‘Zulfiqar’  is a common surname but not in this instance. It was the first time ever in the history of international cricket that three brothers let alone triplets had represented the same team.

While Sikander has played for the Netherlands before, this was the international debut for Asad and Saqib. The family’s connection to Dutch cricket goes back to their father Zulfiqar Ahmed, a Pakistan born cricketer who immigrated to the Netherlands at a young age. He went on to represent his newly adopted country internationally before ingraining the love of the game into his children.

There could soon be a fourth Zulfiqar too as the eldest brother Rehmat has been selected for the Netherlands ‘A’ squad. Now that would be some sight, a team laden with Zulfiqars representing their nation in the international arena.

While Asad and Saqib made 15 and 11 respectively on their debuts, the more experienced Sikander scored and unbeaten 41 to take his side to a total of 182 which was chased down by the UAE with an over to spare.

UAE might have won the match but it was the Zulfiqar triplets who captured the imagination of cricket lovers all over the world. Here is hoping for a World Cup qualification for the Dutch in the near future so that the entire world can marvel at this rare feat.

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England head coach Trevor Bayliss must do his County Championship homework to improve Test team

Chris Bailey 18/07/2017
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Mark Stoneman had been scoring runs at such a prodigious rate in county cricket that it was become irresistible to ignore him. Unless you’re the head coach of England.

Trevor Bayliss made this staggering admission, about the country’s highest-scoring, England-qualified opener ahead of selection for the first Test of the summer:  “To be honest, I haven’t seen him play. He’s done some hard yards up at Durham.”

Let’s give Bayliss a smidgeon of credit. He had been busy preparing and coaching during the Champions Trophy – although he is hardly a hands-on presence – and was out in Abu Dhabi to watch the domestic North v South series between England hopefuls.

At that time he told The Guardian that he would spend the first three rounds of the season ‘driving around having a look’, yet he clearly did not even get as far as south west London.

By week four of the County Championship, Stoneman, inspired by his move south from Durham, had cracked two centuries with Surrey.

Meanwhile, the awkwardly upright Keaton Jennings had been bowled three times down in the bowels of Division Two for the team that Stoneman had left.

Next man up: Mark Stoneman has played for England Lions

Next man up: Mark Stoneman has played for England Lions

Now maybe Jennings did indeed deserve another chance after making a century on debut against India last year, and you’d have hoped that contact time with England would have helped iron out his deficiencies.

But for Bayliss not to have at least done his homework on the domestic game is surely a failure of a key part of his remit.

If he could not have gone to The Oval for a day or two, why not ask for some film and splice together the footage of when Stoneman was on strike? All in an afternoon’s work.

Maybe then Bayliss could offer more than platitudes such as ‘he’s scored a lot of runs’ and ‘he’s done his time’, the type of commentary that is mindlessly rattled off in pundits’ chairs the world over.

If Bayliss does not have at least a working knowledge on the next men to potentially step up for England, then he has no business in a selection meeting.

The Australian had never coached in the country before accepting the role of head coach and his last two jobs had been in T20 cricket. Maybe, just maybe, one of his first tasks should have been to catch up in the red-ball department.

Two years later here England are, still scrabbling around for top-order answers after just 11 Test victories from their last 28 – including the 3-2 Ashes victory over Australia, two years in the books.

Let’s be clear: Bayliss has had a positive effect on English cricket. He has taken the most talented limited-over players England has ever assembled and given them space to breathe, no matter how pitifully their Champions Trophy campaign finished.

The evidence, though, is that he is inflexible in his approach between white-ball cricket and Test cricket, from which a positive mindset can lurch dangerously towards the reckless.

And if the players he is familiar with continue, time and time again, to fail in the longer format then he must step outside of that bubble and figure out how the personnel and play style can be fixed.

Chopping and changing players is not necessarily the answer, as the next man to open the batting will be the 12th that is stepped out alongside Alastair Cook since Andrew Strauss’ retirement in 2012.

But an appreciation of county cricket, the talent funnel with all of its oddities, strengths and flaws, would be a starting point for understanding the problem.

If all this sounds an overreaction to a Test series finely poised at one victory apiece, I warned – alongside numerous others – that the cracks in the batting order at Lord’s would likely be exposed again.

No team, certainly not with the resources that English cricket have, should be bowled out twice at home inside 97 overs and defeated by a margin of 340 runs.

Bayliss called the performance a ‘shocker’ but it was all too depressingly familiar, and it is high time for England’s head coach to show a little more desire to get to the root of it once and for all.

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ICC Women's World Cup: Three key turning points as the England beat South Africa to make final

Ashish Peter 18/07/2017
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In a match worthy of a final let alone a semi-final, the English eves narrowly overcame the South Africans by two wickets with three deliveries to go on Tuesday.

England emerged victorious in a fiercely contested ICC Women’s World Cup semi-final played in Bristol to book their berth in the tournament’s finale.

Winning the toss, the South Africans chose to bat first and would have felt they were around 40 runs short finishing at 218 for the loss of six wickets.

While England did manage to just cross the finish line, there were many twists and turns along the way.

Here, we look at the three key turning points in the evenly contested semi-final.

Double whammy for the Proteas

The South African batting pair of Laura Wolvaardt and Mignon du Preez had rebuilt the innings nicely after the loss of two early wickets.

With the score at a healthy 125 for the loss of two wickets at the end of 33 overs, English skipper Heather Knight brought herself on to bowl her slow right-arm off breaks.

With just her second delivery, Knight clean-bowled the well-set Wolvaardt as she tried to make room to slap a straight delivery through the covers.  The fifth delivery of the over brought further misery for the Green and Yellows when du Preez took off for a sharp single after slapping the ball to the left of Anya Shrubsole at cover.

Shrubsole was sharp and had no hesitation in throwing to the keeper’s end leaving the diving Marizanne Kaap inches short of safety. The double blow took away all the momentum the South Africans had built.

Sarah Taylor runs out a diving Marizanne Kaap.

Sarah Taylor runs out a diving Marizanne Kaap.

England return the favour

The English eves were motoring along nicely at 139 for the loss of two wickets at the end of over number 32 with star player Sarah Taylor looking threatening with a well made half century.

However, disaster struck in the very next over when skipper Knight took off for a single with a push to the left of her opposite counterpart Dane van Niekerk. The Proteas skipper was lethal and affected a brilliant direct hit to run out the well set Taylor with a direct hit.

The next over was even more eventful when the slow legbreak of Sune Luus bore two huge wickets. Knight swatted an inviting full toss straight into the hands of Wolvaardt at square leg while Natalie Sciver was clean bowled attempting a sweep.

From a strong position of 139 for the loss of just two wickets at the end of 32 overs, the English were down to 145 for the loss of five wickets at the end of over number 34.

Wolvaardt pulled off a stunning catch to dismiss Heather Knight.

Wolvaardt pulled off a stunning catch to dismiss Heather Knight.

Jenny Gunn takes England over the line

When Katherine Brunt was bowled by South African pacer Moseline Daniels, England was in a precarious position of 173 runs for the loss of six wickets at the end of 43 overs.

In walked experienced hand Jenny Gunn who then went on to score an unbeaten 27 runs at run-a-ball to guide the English eves over the finish line despite some last over jitters.

She formed an invaluable partnership of 40 runs with Fran Wilson before tail-ender Shrubsole hit the winning boundary in the final over to book England’s place in the summit showdown at Lord’s and broke South African hearts in the process.

Anya Shurbsole celebrates with Jenny Gunn after hitting the winning boundary.

Anya Shurbsole celebrates with Jenny Gunn after hitting the winning boundary.

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