PCB seeks $70m from BCCI as for bailing on bilateral series

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Pakistan Cricket Board 's Chairman: Najam Sethi

Pakistan has kicked off a legal battle against India for not honouring a bilateral cricket series agreement, the sport’s governing body confirmed on Thursday it received a notice of dispute.

The Pakistan cricket Board (PCB) is seeking $70 million in compensation from the Board of Control for cricket in India (BCCI) after the country failed to attend two series in 2014 and 2015 as part of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed between the two boards.

The International cricket Council (ICC) confirmed receiving the notice.

“The ICC has received a Notice of Dispute from the PCB’s lawyers, which will be forwarded to the Chairman of the Dispute Resolutions Committee next week,” a spokesman for the ICC said.

The ICC Dispute Resolution Committee is headed by Michael Beloff QC who will appoint independent adjudicators to hear the case.

The PCB sent a legal notice to their counterparts earlier this year but Indian officials rejected the memorandum as “a piece of paper”.

The arch-rivals have not played a full bilateral series since 2007.

New Delhi halted all bilateral sports with Pakistan in the wake of 2008 Mumbai attacks, which India blamed on militants based in Pakistan.

Those attacks, which killed more than 160 people, nearly brought nuclear-armed arch-enemies India and Pakistan to the brink of war.

The two planned series between India and Pakistan were due to take place at a neutral venue.

The Board of Control for cricket in India (BCCI) was forced to sign the MoU as it needed support from Pakistan on an ICC revamp in 2014, which gave major powers and revenues to India, Australia and India.

India and Pakistan clashed in the Champions Trophy 2017 Final.

India and Pakistan clashed this year in the Champions Trophy Final, in England.

Under the ICC Dispute Resolution Committee terms of references, committee’s head Michael Beloff QC will appoint a three-member panel to hear the case, with Pakistan and India having the right to pick one lawyer each of their choice.

The PCB last month said it seeks 24 matches from India in 2019, 2020 and 2022 – venues to be decided once approved.

Pakistan did tour India for two Twenty20 and three one-day internationals in December 2012-January 2013 but that failed to revive the full series as relations between the two countries went from bad to worse.

Both countries, however, continued to play each other in multi-national ICC events.

Pakistan beat India in the final of the Champions trophy in London in June this year after losing the group match in Birmingham.

Provided by AFP Sport

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England not thinking about Ben Stokes ahead of second Ashes Test, says James Anderson

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Anderson was in bullish mood on Thursday.

James Anderson insists England’s sole intent to retain the Ashes means there will be no partying round Australia this winter.

The tourists’ senior seamer predicts they will be ‘galvanised’ by Australia’s sledging of Jonny Bairstow as they try to battle back from 1-0 down in Adelaide.

Unfazed by their hosts’ tactics, Anderson reports they are not concerned either by the midnight tour curfew imposed after uproar broke out over Bairstow’s strange ‘head-butt’ greeting for Australia opener Cameron Bancroft.

The England wicketkeeper used the unconventional yet benign gesture to introduce himself to Bancroft for the first time in a Perth bar a month ago.

Unwittingly, he opened himself up to ridicule when Australia decided to remind him about it while he was batting in the second innings of the first Test.

The tactic, picked up on stump mic, led to a ruling by England and Wales Cricket Board director Andrew Strauss that his players should not stay out so late again here.

But Anderson said: “It is not like we are party animals, out till three every night.

“Our focus is showing what we can do with a cricket bat and ball in our hands.”

It will only help him, and team-mates such as Bairstow, focus even harder if Australia keep trying to put them off their game.

“When someone is trying to get under my skin in all walks of life it makes me more determined to succeed,” Anderson added.

“It is up to us individually and as a group to stick together and know that we are not here to roll over.”

None of the chat which accompanied England’s 10-wicket defeat in Brisbane surprised Anderson.

“It’s up to us to try to deal with that, ignore it … if anything it will galvanise us as a group,” he said.

“We’re all going to get behind Jonny, who is an important player in our team.

“If we need any more incentive to get back in the series, it will give us that.”

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 30: Joe Root of England and England Head Coach Trevor Bayliss look on during an England Nets Session at Adelaide Oval on November 30, 2017 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Daniel Kalisz/Getty Images)

England are preparing for the second Test in Adelaide.

England are still having to contend with another vexed topic, which has persisted all tour over Ben Stokes’ possible addition to the squad – depending on whether he is charged by police following his arrest in September on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm during a late-night fracas in Bristol.

The brilliant all-rounder is scheduled to resume playing, after signing for Canterbury Kings in New Zealand, but any resolution to his Ashes hopes appears as far away as ever.

After the case was passed by police to the Crown Prosecution Service, Anderson reiterated the stance England’s players have taken from the outset.

“It’s out of our hands,” he said.

“It’s not something we really think about.

“You don’t not talk about it deliberately – it just doesn’t come up.

“We are really focused on trying to win this Test series, and it’s important we do focus on that – because any distractions outside our group will probably inhibit that.”

They faltered badly after a promising start at the Gabba, and Anderson added: “We were very frustrated with the way the game finished in Brisbane.

“We started really well … getting our noses in front at times and just not being able to capitalise.

“(Being) 240 for four in the first innings, then getting 300, is not good enough.

“Having them 200 for seven and not finish the tail off is not good enough.”

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Australia spinner Nathan Lyon rejects 'villain' tag at Ashes series

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Lyon had refuted suggestions of being the 'villain' in the piece.

Nathan Lyon, who has spooked England’s batsmen from ball one, rejects suggestions that he is the ‘pantomime villain’ of this winter’s Ashes series.

In fact, the Australia off-spinner’s impact on the series dates back well before then, three days from stumps being pitched in the first Test at the Gabba, when he spoke in his off-the-scale press conference of ending English careers.

He threw in gleeful reference, for good measure, to players running scared during the tourists’ 2013/14 Ashes whitewash defeat.

Since that opening gambit, Lyon has backed up his words with deeds – far from flattered by his five wickets as Australia surged to a resounding victory to go 1-0 up.

He has had time for two more press conferences too. But there have been none of the pre-series histrionics as he has chosen a much more measured tone and, in his latest before the inaugural day-night Ashes Test at the Adelaide Oval, made a particular point of voicing his respect for the opposition – several times.

The 30-year-old veteran of 60 Tests even appeared momentarily wrong-footed by one notion about his new-found status of notoriety.

“The villain?” he asked.

“Er, dunno about the villain.”

Equally, he was not about to agree he has already put the wind up the left-handers in England’s line-up – despite having made short work of both Mark Stoneman and Dawid Malan in the second innings in Brisbane.

“I don’t think I’ve spooked anyone,” Lyon said, before adding he is not about to back-track on any of his pre-series claims.

Lyon had ruffled feathers with his comments about 'ending careers'.

Lyon had ruffled feathers with his comments about ‘ending careers’.

“I still stand by my comments. That’s the Australian way.

“I’m here to play cricket. I’m here to represent my country in the best possible way.

“I know how to bowl here in Australia. I know how to compete.

“That’s probably where my confidence is coming from.”

Nonetheless, he is at pains to stress Australia are not about to take Joe Root’s tourists lightly.

“It’s one of the dangerous periods when teams are far down, or in turmoil if you want to call it that.

“I don’t think they are, but if you don’t respect teams that’s when they can come back and bite you.”

Bancroft revealed he found Jonny Bairstow's 'head-butt' greeting weird.

Bancroft revealed he found Jonny Bairstow’s ‘head-butt’ greeting weird.

England have issues off the field as well as on, with Jonny Bairstow briefly in shock at the furore after Australia ribbed him about the friendly ‘head-butt’ greeting he administered to opener Cameron Bancroft on their first meeting in a social setting last month in Perth.

Lyon does not seem to believe they are on the run yet, though.

“We respect the English, we know they’re going to come back bigger and better and stronger – and we know they’re going to try and take us down here,” he said.

“We’re expecting them to bounce back and hit us hard … so it’s going to be a massive challenge for us.”

“They are a classy side … it’s not going to be a walk in the park.”

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