South Africa star Dale Steyn likely to miss India Test series due to heel injury

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South African fast bowler Dale Steyn is likely to miss the rest of the Test series against India after what was described as a “freakish” injury on the second day of the first Test at Newlands on Saturday.

It was yet another injury setback for Steyn, who was playing his first match in more than a year after suffering a fractured shoulder in Australia in November 2016.

Team manager and doctor Mohammed Moosajee said what he described as a “freakish” injury was unrelated to bowling workload or being match ready after his long lay-off.

“He was in his delivery stride and landed awkwardly in the foot holes,” said Moosajee. “This caused a significant strain to the foot, leading to tissue damage on the underside of the foot.”

Moosajee said the type of issue usually needed a recovery period of four to six weeks, which would rule him out of the rest of the match as well as the two remaining Test matches.

Steyn had taken two wickets for 51 runs in the first innings, taking his career total of Test wickets to 419, two short of Shaun Pollock’s all-time South African record.

Steyn, 34, has played in only six of South Africa’s most recent 27 Test matches. He has broken down in four of them.

He suffered a groin injury in the first Test of a series in India in November 2016, then had a shoulder injury against England in December that year.

He played in two Tests against New Zealand in August 2016 before his more serious shoulder injury in Australia.

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Kane Williamson hits hundred as New Zealand beat Pakistan by Duckworth-Lewis in first ODI

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In form: Kane Williamson.

Kane Williamson may have been New Zealand’s hero in their dominant win over Pakistan in the opening one-day international in Wellington on Saturday, but he said it was not a game for heroics.

“You’re always thinking about the role you need to play and the situation of the game, and it certainly didn’t require something silly,” Williamson said after New Zealand beat the Champions Trophy holders by 61 runs under the Duckworth-Lewis system.

New Zealand made 315 for seven in their 50 overs and had the tourists at 166 for six when rain stopped play in the 31st over.

Pakistan had arrived on a nine-match winning streak but fresh from playing in more accommodating conditions than the 120 kilometre an hour (75 mph) winds and rain that greeted them in Wellington.

After being sent in to bat, Colin Munro (58) and Martin Guptill (48) gave New Zealand a flying start with 83 for the first wicket before Williamson went to the middle with the dismissal of Munro in the 13th over.

While the openers plundered the boundaries, Williamson’s 115 off 117 deliveries came from a diet of ones and twos with only eight fours and one six.

“It was holding in the wicket a little bit, and you come to a point in your innings where you either address it sensibly and accept that’s what it is doing, or you do something silly,” Williamson said.

“Today I was a little bit more sensible and accepting of the fact that they did bowl well for a long time there, and I felt we were perhaps fortunate to get that above 300 score.

“They did execute their plans well, the wind was tough to deal with, and maybe that’s where we gained an upper hand, but you do ebb and flow through an innings.”

Spectators watch the first one day international cricket match between New Zealand and Pakistan at the Basin Reserve in Wellington on January 6, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Marty MELVILLE (Photo credit should read MARTY MELVILLE/AFP/Getty Images)

Spectators watch on at the Basin Reserve.

Williamson, who was dropped on 26 by Pakistan wicketkeeper and captain Sarfraz Ahmed, also featured in a 90-run partnership off 80 balls with Henry Nicholls before he was caught by Hasan Ali off Rumman Raees in the 48th over.

Ali was central in most of the key New Zealand wickets with the dismissals of Munroe, Nicholls (50) and Ross Taylor (12) to finish with three for 61.

Pakistan were in trouble in the very first over of their reply when Tim Southee took the wickets of Azhar Ali and Babar Azam, both lbw.

Fakhar Zaman battled bravely to try to restore the Pakistan innings and was unbeaten on 82, the only innings of note, when rain stopped play and Southee had the figures of three for 22.

“It’s a setback for us, especially after losing two wickets in the first over,” said Sarfraz who also shouldered part of the blame for his own fielding lapse.

“The New Zealand’s batsmen batted well, especially Kane Williamson. If you drop catches, it becomes tough. Hopefully we will sit together and come up with a better performance next time.”

The second match in the five-match series is in Nelson on Tuesday.

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Khawaja scores big century as Australia finish day three in pole position

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Khawaja scored 171.

Usman Khawaja plundered a big century as Australia roasted England’s bowlers on Saturday to open up a 133-run lead with two days to play in the final Ashes Test in Sydney.

Khawaja top-scored with 171 while Shaun Marsh finished unbeaten on 98 after Steve Smith fell for 83 as Australia built a substantial lead with more runs to come and intense 40 Celsius (104 F) heat forecast for Sunday’s fourth day.

Australia have already regained the Ashes with an unassailable 3-0 lead and are looking to close out the series 4-0 after last week’s fourth test in Melbourne was drawn.

At the close of play on a dispiriting third day for the tourists, who took just two wickets, brothers Shaun and Mitchell Marsh were making merry in an unbroken 104-run partnership as Australia cruised to 479 for four.

Mitchell Marsh clubbed Moeen Ali for two sixes in three balls to be 63 not out off 87 balls at stumps after surviving a leg before wicket review in the final overs.

Khawaja batted for 515 minutes off 381 balls with 18 fours and a six for his maiden Ashes Test hundred.

“You don’t get to celebrate Test centuries too much unless you’re Steve Smith. You’ve got to enjoy them when they come,” Khawaja said.

It was the Pakistan-born Khawaja’s sixth Test hundred and first in Sydney and came at a time when some former players were calling for his sacking despite scoring two half-centuries earlier in the series.

“It’s disappointing,” Khawaja said of the criticism.

“When I am scoring runs, I’m elegant and when I’m not scoring runs I’m lazy. Can’t seem to win, when things aren’t going well.

“I’ve had that throughout my career. It’s disappointing to hear but it’s something I have dealt with throughout my career.”

Australia's Shaun Marsh hooks a delivery from the England bowling on the third day of the fifth Ashes cricket Test match at the SCG in Sydney on January 6, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / William WEST / -- IMAGE RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - STRICTLY NO COMMERCIAL USE -- (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

Shaun Marsh is closing in a ton.

He fell three runs short of his highest Test score of 174 scored against New Zealand in Brisbane in 2015.

Debutant Mason Crane ended Khawaja’s epic innings to capture his first Test wicket when he had him stumped by Jonny Bairstow with a sharp turner that left the Australian No.3 stranded out of his ground.

It was due reward for the Hampshire leg spinner, who endured the heartbreak of having a leg before wicket review rubbed out for a borderline no-ball when Khawaja was on 132 earlier in the day.

Crane, who at 20 is the youngest specialist spinner to play for England in 90 years, showed plenty of heart to keep plugging away without much luck until dismissing Khawaja.

Crane finished a challenging day with one wicket for 135 off 39 overs.

“It was a pretty tough day,” Bairstow said. “We’re 150 overs into the innings so there’s going to be a few tired bodies out there.

“I thought the way the guys toiled out there and really worked hard was impressive and that’s really good to see for us as a side going forward.”

Shaun Marsh reached his fourth half-century of the series and survived a review on 22 for a catch behind off Joe Root after the “Snicko” and “Hot Spot” technology could not find supporting evidence.

England earlier claimed Smith’s prized wicket before lunch when Ali caught and bowled the Australian skipper when he seemed set to make his fourth century of the series.

Smith, who looked untroubled batting patiently through the morning session, left the field shaking his head after batting for 253 minutes and facing 158 balls.

Smith and Khawaja seized the momentum for Australia with a 188-run stand as England chase a face-saving win after surrendering the Ashes after just three matches.

The skipper has been one of the key differences between the two sides in the series, amassing 687 runs at an average of 137.40 with a top score of 239, his Test best.

There was drama in the final over before lunch when Khawaja survived a review for leg before wicket but only after Crane had been found to have just overstepped for a no-ball.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 06: Mason Crane of England celebrates dismissing Usman Khawaja of Australia during day three of the Fifth Test match in the 2017/18 Ashes Series between Australia and England at Sydney Cricket Ground on January 6, 2018 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Mason Crane celebrates his first Test wicket.

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