Virat Kohli and MS Dhoni rested as Rohit Sharma is named India captain for Sri Lanka T20 tri-series

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Rohit Sharma will lead India in Kohli's absence.

India have rested several big names for the upcoming Nidahas Trophy to be held in Sri Lanka from March 6.

Rohit Sharma was named captain for the T20I tri-series also involving Bangladesh with Virat Kohli being given a rest after a demanding tour of South Africa.

Also joining Kohli for some well deserved rest are MS Dhoni, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah and Hardik Pandya.

Washington Sundar, Rishabh Pant, Deepak Hooda and Mohammad Siraj have all been given a call up for the tournament in Sri Lanka.

While Rohit has been named captain for the tournament, fellow opener Shikhar Dhawan has been appointed his deputy.

Fast bowlers Bumrah and Bhuvenshwar had a heavy work load in South Africa and will take a thoroughly deserved rest.

Pant has been given his second call up for India.

Pant has played two T20s for India.

Chairman of selection committee, MSK Prasad, said: “We’ve kept in mind the workload and upcoming schedule while finalizing the team for Nidahas Trophy. The high-performance team has suggested that adequate rest should be given to our fast bowlers to help improve athletic performance, maximise rest and prevent injury.”

This is Pant’s first call up since playing a lone T20I against the West Indies last year while Sundar, Hooda and Siraj have all been called up to the limited-overs squads in recent times.

INDIA SQUAD: Rohit Sharma (capt), Shikhar Dhawan, KL Rahul, Suresh Raina, Manish Pandey, Dinesh Karthik (wk), Rishabh Pant (wk), Deepak Hooda, Washington Sundar, Yuzvendra Chahal, Axar Patel, Vijay Shankar, Shardul Thakur, Jaydev Unadkat, Mohammad Siraj.

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England limited-overs skipper Eoin Morgan fears for the future of Test cricket

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Morgan fears that the format is losing out to T20 cricket in many countries.

Eoin Morgan fears the opportunity to salvage Test cricket’s primacy over short formats may already have been missed.

At 31, England‘s white-ball captain played the last of his 16 Tests more than six years ago, and has already publicly acknowledged more than once that his international future is exclusive to 50 and 20-over fixtures.

He is nonetheless a notable voice in the debate about Test cricket’s status, and appears in little doubt that the threat from lucrative Twenty20 domestic franchise contracts is no longer a mere talking point but present and future reality.

Two cases in point reside in his own England team following Alex Hales and Adil Rashid‘s decisions in recent weeks to sign white-ball only contracts with their respective counties – and therefore effectively sacrifice any Test ambitions for the foreseeable future.

“Test match cricket has had a lot to worry about for quite a while now,” said the Irishman.

“If something was going to be done about it, it probably should have been done already.

“There are still, I suppose, different ideas being thrown around – but actually giving priority to Test matches is sort of a luxury now for the bigger countries around the world.

“For other countries, T20 franchise cricket takes priority.”

Proposed measures to come to the aid of Test cricket have, of late, included the advent of day-night pink-ball fixtures and an inaugural four-day match.

Morgan has backed Hales' and Rashid's decision to focus on white-ball cricket.

Morgan has backed Hales’ and Rashid’s decision to focus on white-ball cricket.

Morgan senses, however, that a correction of player finances from global administrators may yet be the most effective policy.

“The best ideas probably being bandied around are putting most revenue behind the match appearances or actual prize money towards Test match cricket,” he said.

“(Then) there’s no [influence] on what format people choose, simply because of the money they might make.

“(Their decision) is all down to how good they are at that particular format.”

As for the switches made of late by Hales and Rashid, Morgan is supportive.

“I think it’s a really good decision for those individuals,” he added.

“Every individual is different – they see their future and their pathway changing all the time, and it’s okay to be able to change it.

“A lot of people actually are forced into a position to play one or two formats – which I think is wrong, because it’s their own career, it’s their own future.

“They need to take hold of it and make the most of it while they can.”

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Ben Stokes' eventful return and other talking points as New Zealand beat England

Ashish Peter 25/02/2018
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Stokes was in the thick of things on his return.

New Zealand pulled off a remarkable and tense chase to beat England by three wickets in the first ODI at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

There were talking points aplenty in a high-scoring game at Hamilton as we take a look at the key ones.

BEN STOKES’ EVENTFUL RETURN

All eyes in the first ODI were always going to be on Ben Stokes’ return to the national fold following his indefinite suspension for the infamous Bristol bar incident. His first innings upon his return lasted only 22 balls with the scratchiness from a long lay-off well evident.

However, his golden arm was at the fore once again as he broke a potentially match-winning partnership between Taylor and Latham by removing the latter for his first wicket since September.

He then deceived Colin de Grandhomme with a slower ball to capture his second wicket, making his return to the side for the first time since September an eventful one.

The 26-year-old was some way off the athletic force he can be and that is understandable after being out for so long. However, despite the rustiness, he remained in the thick of things and should be back at his very best with some more match practice.

Stokes was scratchy with the bat but showed he still has a golden arm.

Stokes was scratchy with the bat but showed he still has a golden arm.

ROSS TAYLOR JOINS THE 7,000 CLUB

The Kiwi middle-order batsman showed once again that he is hugely underrated. With the hosts in all sorts of trouble after being reduced to 27-3 in their chase of 285, Ross Taylor combined with Tom Latham to put on a stupendous partnership of 179. It was very much reminiscent of their match-winning 200-run stand for the fourth wicket during their ODI tour of India towards the end of 2017.

While Latham eventually departed for a well-made 79, Taylor carried on to slam his 18th ODI ton, breaching the 7,000-run mark in the process. He becomes the third Kiwi batsman after Stephen Fleming and Nathan Astle to reach that figure and the seventh fastest overall in the history of ODI cricket

The underrated batsman notched up his 18th ODI ton.

The underrated batsman notched up his 18th ODI ton.

SANTNER’S SMASHING CAMEO WINS IT FOR THE HOSTS

While Taylor and Latham had done all the hard work of getting New Zealand closer to the finish line, it took an entertaining cameo from all-rounder Mitchell Santner to eventually win it. Just when it looked like England had extinguished all Kiwi hopes with the dismissals of Taylor and Latham, Santner pulled out a stunning knock from his locker.

He finished the match off with a six off Chris Woakes, his fourth of the innings, to finish unbeaten on 45 from just 26 deliveries.

Santner turned the game on its head with a match-winning cameo.

Santner turned the game on its head with a match-winning cameo.

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