Five things learned from brief history of day-night Test cricket so far

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Edgbaston hosted England and West Indies in August 2017.

The first Test between New Zealand and England, starting at Eden Park in Auckland on Thursday, is the maiden day-night Test in New Zealand and only the ninth worldwide.

AFP Sport looks at five things we have learned in the brief history of Test cricket under lights:

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HOME ADVANTAGE

Sri Lanka are the only team to win a day-night Test away when they beat Pakistan by 68 runs in Dubai last year. The other seven have all been home-ground victories. Sri Lanka scored 482 and 96 against Pakistan who replied with 262 and 248.

Sri Lanka's cricket team members celebrate after winning the Second Test cricket match between Pakistan and Sri Lanka at Dubai International Cricket Ground in Dubai on October 10, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / KARIM SAHIB (Photo credit should read KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)

Sri Lanka edged Pakistan in Dubai

BAGGY GREENS IN THE PINK

Australia have played the most pink-ball Tests and are also the most successful side under day-night conditions with a 4-0 record. England and South Africa have both recorded a win and a loss, while the only other successful teams are Sri Lanka (1-0) and Pakistan (1-2).

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 24: A fielder picks up the pink cricket ball in the 65th over during day one of the Third Test match between Australia and South Africa at Adelaide Oval on November 24, 2016 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Morne de Klerk/Getty Images)

The use of the pink ball has become more common.

MAKING LIGHT OF DUSK

Pakistan opener Azhar Ali showed changing light conditions need not be a problem when he compiled an unbeaten 302 against the West Indies in Dubai in October 2016. He batted for nearly 11 hours for what remains the highest score in a day-night Test. But he went for two in the second innings and five in the first innings of his next Test under lights against Australia two months later.

A general view shows empty enclosures on the opening day of the first day-night Test between Pakistan and the West Indies at the Dubai International Cricket Stadium in the Gulf Emirate on October 13, 2016. Pakistan captain Misbah-ul-Hq won the toss and opted to bat in the first Test -- a day-night affair with a pink ball -- against the West Indies in Dubai. / AFP / AAMIR QURESHI (Photo credit should read AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images)

The match was played in a near empty stadium.

PAKISTAN PILE ON THE RUNS

The highest score in a pink-ball Test is Pakistan’s 579 for three declared in 155.3 overs when Azhar performed his heroics against the West Indies. Pakistan only managed 123 in the second innings – when Devendra Bishoo took eight for 49 – but held on to win by 56 runs.

Pakistani batsman Azhar Ali celebrates after scoring double century (200 runs) on the second day of first day-night test between Pakistan and the West Indies at the Dubai International Cricket Stadium in the Gulf Emirate on October 14, 2016. / AFP / AAMIR QURESHI (Photo credit should read AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistani batsman Azhar Ali scored a triple ton in Dubai.

KIWIS’ CALL

The first pink-ball Test was played between New Zealand and Australia at Adelaide Oval in November 2015. New Zealand won the toss, elected to bat and ended up losing by three wickets.

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 27: A general view as the sun sets during day one of the Third Test match between Australia and New Zealand at Adelaide Oval on November 27, 2015 in Adelaide, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Picture-perfect: The Adelaide Oval under lights.

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Kevin Pietersen has decided to retire from all forms of cricket.

The former England international had been edging towards retirement for quite some time and made his decision clear through an Instagram post.

The 37-year-old played in 104 Tests for England and scored 23 hundreds, while amassing 8,181 Test runs.

Pietersen though, had become a T20 specialist over the last few years, and played an integral part in franchise cricket mainly for Quetta Gladiators in the PSL.

And while an eventful career comes to an end, stars from all around the globe congratulated Pietersen on his successful journey.

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Fast bowler Kagiso Rabada will learn the result of his appeal against a ban for the remaining two Tests against Australia within 48 hours following a hearing on Monday, Cricket South Africa said.

The hearing, via teleconference with judicial commissioner Michael Heron of New Zealand, lasted for more than five hours.

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Rabada, who has been highly influential in the two Tests so far, was given the ban for a physical contact with Australian captain Steve Smith during the second Test in Port Elizabeth.

Rabada’s brush with Smith led to him being given three demerit points which took him to the eight-point threshold that triggers an automatic two-Test ban.

South African captain Faf du Plessis attended the early part of the meeting before leaving to join the team but team manager Mohammed Moosajee and advocate Dali Mpofu remained with Rabada.

Australia’s tour has been marred by altercations on and off the field. In the first Test, the visitors’ vice-captain David Warner was involved in an altercation with South Africa wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock in a stairwell.

Former Australia fast bowler Brett Lee said that while he did not want to see behaviour “crossing the line”, emotion and aggression were part of the game.

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