Virat Kohli, Stuart Broad and Mitchell McClenaghan back Sachin Tendulkar in ODI new balls debate

Sudhir Gupta 22/06/2018
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Kohli has supported Sachin Tendulkar's views on the subject.

India skipper Virat Kohli, England pacer Stuart Broad and New Zealand’s Mitchell McClenaghan have all joined the chorus against the two new balls rule in ODI cricket following Sachin Tendulkar and Waqar Younis’ criticisms.

Earlier on Friday, Tendulkar had suggested the two-ball rule was stopping bowlers from generating reverse swing.

“Having two new balls in one day is a perfect recipe for disaster as each ball is not given the time to get old enough to reverse. We haven’t seen reverse swing, an integral part of the death overs, for a long time,” Tendulkar had written in a Twitter post.

His comments received support from Pakistan pace legend Waqar Younis shortly after who agreed that reverse swing was a dying art in the current limited-overs game.

Kohli gave his views on the issue during the pre-tour press conference in New Delhi ahead of India’s departure for Ireland and England.

“I think it’s brutal for the bowlers. I have played ODI cricket when there was only one new ball allowed and reverse swing used to be a massive factor in the latter half of the innings, which I think as a batsman was more challenging,” Kohli said.

Soon, Broad and McClenaghan too took to Twitter to have their say on the rule. “I find reverse swing really exciting to watch, I’d like to see it back in the white ball game,” Broad wrote in his post.

New Zealand and Mumbai Indians pacer McClenaghan agreed with Tendulkar’s post, tweeting: “Could it be said any better? – don’t think so,” the Kiwi stated.

The two new balls rule came into effect in ODI cricket in 2011 with each ball getting used for 25 overs.

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Sri Lanka captain Dinesh Chandimal and senior management admit to breaching ICC code of conduct

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Sri Lanka‘s captain, coach and team manager have admitted breaching the International Cricket Council’s code of conduct after the team refused to take to the field against West Indies last weekend.

The third day of the second Test in St Lucia last Saturday was held up by two hours after the tourists failed to come out, in protest at the umpires’ decision to impose a five-run penalty and replace the match ball.

That decision was reached after the officials ruled that the condition of the original ball had been altered by Sri Lanka captain Dinesh Chandimal.

He was handed a one-match ban in regard to that incident, and his appeal against the sanction will be heard on Friday.

An ICC statement released on Friday morning read: “Sri Lanka captain Dinesh Chandimal, coach Chandika Hathurusingha and manager Asanka Gurusinha have admitted to breaching Article 2.3.1, a Level 3 offence, which relates to ‘conduct that is contrary to the spirit of the game’.

“Following their admission, the ICC, in accordance with Article 5.2 of the ICC code of conduct, has appointed the Hon Michael Beloff QC as the judicial commissioner to hear the case to determine the appropriate sanction.

“Mr Beloff has also been appointed as the judicial commissioner to hear Mr Chandimal’s appeal against the match referee’s decision for changing the condition of the ball.

“The three were charged by the ICC chief executive David Richardson on Tuesday for their involvement in the Sri Lanka cricket team’s refusal to take to the field in St Lucia at the start of Saturday’s play, which caused a two-hour delay in the start of play.

“This action was alleged to amount to a serious breach of the Laws of Cricket and to be contrary to the spirit of the game. All Level 3 breaches carry an imposition of between four and eight suspension points.”

Sri Lanka eventually took to the field at 1050 local time – 50 minutes after the scheduled start – but there was then a further delay of 40 minutes as Chandimal began arguing with the umpires before a delivery was bowled.

The tourists gathered on the boundary, but after further negotiations with match referee Javagal Srinath and their coaching staff, Lahiru Kumara finally resumed his 14th over at 1130 with a replacement ball selected by the West Indies batsmen.

Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) released a statement on Saturday saying its players “have not engaged in any wrongdoing” and that the team had taken to the field “under protest”.

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Sachin Tendulkar and Waqar Younis question ODI cricket's two new balls rule

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Legends Sachin Tendulkar and Waqar Younis have voiced their disapproval at the use of two new balls in one-day international (ODI) cricket following a series of big totals.

Tendulkar, who retired as the highest run-scorer in the history of the format, tweeted that having two fresh pieces of leather in each innings “is a perfect recipe for disaster as each ball is not given the time to get old enough to reverse (swing)”.

Supporting his call the former Pakistan bowler, a master of reverse swing himself in his playing days, tweeted that he “totally agreed” with Tendulkar.

“Reason why we don’t produce many attacking fast bowlers..They all very defensive in their approach,” he said.

Waqar Younis

He added: “reverse swing is almost vanished..#SAD”.

The duo have come out with their opinion days after Eoin Morgan’s England side set a new ODI record, scoring 481-6 against Australia at Nottingham.

On Thursday, the trend continued as England chased down Australia’s 310 with ease.

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