Memories of 2014 haunt India as visitors head to Southampton for fourth Test

Ashish Peter 27/08/2018
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James Anderson was a thorn in India's flesh at Southampton in 2014.

The Rose Bowl in Southampton will be the setting for the fourth Test between England and India which gets underway on Thursday.

The visitors have clawed their way back in the five-series after a thumping 203-win at Trent Bridge following losses at Edgbaston and Lord’s.

With the series poised finely heading into the fourth Test, the stakes will be high for both teams when they take the field at Southampton.

Here, we take a look at the two previous Tests to be held at the ground.

ENGLAND V SRI LANKA, JUNE 2011

Result: Drawn

The Rose Bowl played host to the third Test between England and Sri Lanka during the latter’s tour of 2011. England skipper Andrew Strauss put Sri Lanka in to bat after winning the toss and saw the visitors fold for just 184 in their first innings with pacer Chris Tremlett picking up 6-48.

Led by an unbeaten ton from Ian Bell and an 85 from Kevin Pietersen, the hosts declared their first innings at 377-8 leaving Sri Lanka with plenty of work to do in their second innings.

In a rain-effected match, the visitors responded in earnest as Kumar Sangakkara registered his maiden ton on English soil. The Sri Lankan great put together a 75-run stand with night watchman Rangana Herath for the fourth wicket to frustrate England before putting together a 141-run stand with Thilan Samaraweera to effectively end the contest and earn a hard-fought draw for the subcontinent side. The visitors ultimately ended their second innings at 334-5 with Samaraweera remaining unbeaten on 85.

Sangakkara and Samaraweera saved the day for Sri Lanka.

Sangakkara and Samaraweera saved the day for Sri Lanka.

ENGLAND V INDIA, JULY 2014

Result: England won by 266 runs

Such was India’s great fortune at the start of their tour in 2014 that they arrived in Southampton for the third Test with a 1-0 lead in the five-match series.

Unfortunately for the visitors, the Rose Bowl would start a run of three-consecutive crushing losses. England skipper Alastair Cook had no hesitation in batting first after winning the toss and his decision was vindicated with the hosts going on to post a mammoth 569-7 before declaring their first innings.

While Cook (95) himself shone with the bat, it was Gary Ballance (156) and Ian Bell (167) who took the winds out of India’s sail. In reply, none of the Indian batsmen would progress beyond 54 as James Anderson’s five-wicket haul (5-53) saw the visitors hit just 330 in their first innings.

England chose not to enforce the follow-on and a quick-fire 205-4 in just 40-odd overs in their second innings meant that India were set a daunting chase of 442.

Ajinkya Rahane (52 not out) registered his second fifty in the match but it was not enough to save India’s blushes as they were bundled out for just 178 in their final innings. It was Moeen Ali who did the primary damage in the second innings with the England off-spinner claiming 6-67 to lead the hosts to a commanding victory.

Moeen Ali spun England to a big win with a 6-67 in the second innings.

Moeen Ali spun England to a big win with a 6-67 in the second innings.

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Nick Compton says credit for India's formidable pace attack should go to Duncan Fletcher

Sudhir Gupta 27/08/2018
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Former England and India coach: Duncan Fletcher.

Former England international Nick Compton believes the credit for India’s current pace attack displays should go to former coach Duncan Fletcher.

Indian pacers have come on leaps and bounds over the past couple of years with the likes of Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Jasprit Bumrah, Mohammed Shami, Ishant Sharma and Umesh Yadav developing into a formidable attack in overseas conditions.

The India pace attack claimed 19 of the 20 England wickets to fall in Trent Bridge in the visitors’ 203-run win with their excess speeds in comparisons to their English counterparts particularly catching the eye.

Compton believes Fletcher’s role as India coach between 2011 and 2015 deserves major credit for the way the pace attack has shaped up.

“India’s pace attack hasn’t come together all of a sudden. It has taken time and it has happened one by one, as all of these bowlers took their time coming off age,” Compton told the Press Trust of India (PTI).

“India didn’t have so many pacers at once earlier, but now they do. And all (most) of them, at some point have played under Fletcher, so it is a credit to him. This process (of building a pace attack) started long ago and it has come together for India now.”

Fletcher had a four-year tenure as coach of India.

Fletcher had a four-year tenure as coach of India.

He added: “The difference from the past is that these bowlers do not compromise on pace. Like James Anderson and Stuart Broad, they retain the ability to move the ball at pace. Pace. That’s the keyword. You have to consider why the likes of Anderson and Stuart Broad have been so successful in their careers.

“They have a thousand wickets between them in Test cricket because they move the ball at pace. And it is no coincidence that both of them started their England careers under Duncan Fletcher.”

Zimbabwe-born Fletcher had enjoyed an eight-year tenure as coach of the England team between 1999 and 2007 before taking charge of the Indian team in 2011. During his team with England, the side recaptured the Ashes from arch-rivals Australia after a gap of 18 years in 2005.

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ICC World Cup's nine-month Trophy Tour to include Nepal and USA

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Former England players James Taylor (r) and Charlotte Edwards with the World Cup trophy.

The ICC World Cup Trophy Tour will begin its nine-month journey around the world on Monday from the ICC headquarters in Dubai.

The trophy will travel across five continents, 21 countries and over 60 cities, making it the “most connected Trophy Tour ever”, the ICC said in a release.

The World Cup will be held in England next year with the final at Lord’s on July 14.

During the journey, the World Cup trophy will also make stops at countries not part of the tournament, including Nepal, USA and Germany.

According to the ICC, the trophy tour will begin in the UAE and will then go to Oman, the USA, the West Indies, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Bangladesh. From there, the coveted trophy moves to Nepal, India, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda and Nigeria.

The trophy will then move to Europe, travelling to France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany before arriving in England and Wales on February 19 next year.

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