India captain Virat Kohli says the beard stays

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Virat Kohli is keeping his famous beard

India cricket captain Virat Kohli insisted Thursday he will not be shaving off his famous beard any time soon.

The 29-year-old batsman, who said he still cleans his own cricket shoes despite being one of the world’s highest paid athletes, has in recent years become a style icon because of the beard.

A fan asked Kohli at a promotional event whether he would ever get rid of his carefully trimmed bristles.

“I don’t think so, I really like it,” replied Kohli who will next month play for English county Surrey to prepare for India’s tour later this year.

“I think it suits me. So I don’t want to get rid of it.

“Looking after it is not that difficult because the beard oils have come in and it’s very easy. A little bit of beard oil and it’s in place.

“But when it gets too big and thick then obviously I have to trim it. That’s the only thing. But no, I would not get rid of it.”

Beards became almost ubiquitous in the Indian team until last year when a small group of players including Hardik Pandya and Rohit Sharma said they would shave to break the stranglehold.

Kohli’s then-girlfriend, and now wife, Bollywood actor Anushka Sharma went onto social media to declare “you cannot” when questions were asked about the Indian captain’s style.

Kohli is now one of the most featured celebrities in television advertising but he said the only must in his wardrobe was a pair of white sneakers that he cleans every two weeks. “I clean my cricket shoes as well,” he said.

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Virat Kohli 'disturbed' by lack of physical activity and sports adoption in India

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Kohli is shocked by the lack of physical activity undertaken by Indians.

India and Royal Challengers Bangalore skipper Virat Kohli has been a big proponent of leading a healthy lifestyle.

Hence, it is no surprise that Kohli is ‘disturbed’ by the results of the latest study conducted by sportswear giants PUMA and Kantar IMRB. The pan-India study was conducted on respondents between the age of 22 and 40.

According to the results, one-third of the participants had not undertaken any form of physical activity in the past one year while 57 per cent of respondents had not played a single sport in the same period.

The study also showed that sports adoption dropped drastically in higher age brackets, which is a worrying a trend.

The same respondents, however, spend an average of 4-5 hours per day on TV, mobile phone and social media.

While dealing with a problem of malnourishment, India is also facing an obesity problem. Data released in October last year by the World Obesity Federation says that the percentage of Indian adults living with obesity is set to jump to five per cent by 2025 compared to 3.7 per cent in 2014.

Kohli, who is the brand ambassador for PUMA, took to Twitter to share the results of the study while describing it as disturbing.

The 29-year-old is one of the fittest players in the cricketing world and follows a rigorous workout regime a strict diet plan.

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Virat Kohli recalls moment of entering Indian dressing room for first time and why fitness is important

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Virat Kohli continues to go from strength to strength with his batting abilities and it’s no real surprise he credits his fitness as one of the key factors.

It’s a busy period for the Indian captain with the on-going IPL, before he flies out to England next month for a county stint with Surrey ahead of the national team’s tour against Joe Root’s side this summer.

Speaking to The Times of India, the ace batsman spoke on why he would still take time to exercise even if he wasn’t a sportsman, and why kids must divide time between social medial, school, exercise and video games.

He also spoke of his memories of joining the Indian dressing room for the first time.

Importance of fitness:

“It had to do with playing at a certain level in professional sport. I realised that when I started getting fitter, I started thinking better. I had more clarity, focus and determination. I started feeling that inside me as soon as I changed my physical regime. Getting fitter makes you confident overall. It makes you feel good about yourself. You need to feel good to have good thoughts.”

His thoughts on entering the Indian dressing room for the first time:

“I clearly remember sitting with my mum and watching the news on the day of the selection meeting. My name just flashed on the TV but I thought they might just be spreading a rumour. Five minutes later, I got a call from the board. I got goosebumps. I was shaking.

“I clearly remember walking into the team meeting. I was asked to give a speech in the team room. It was nerve-wracking for me with so many great Indian players there. They were looking at me. Which we now do to younger guys to intimidate them, make them nervous [smiles]. These are my first memories.”

The impact of technology for kids

“Even if I was not playing professional cricket, I can’t imagine myself not doing any physical activity at all. The survey conducted [by sportswear manufacturer PUMA] shows that people are spending four to five hours every day on the mobile phone. Technology and social platforms, rather than being helpful, are starting to become harmful. People are losing sense of what are the important things to do, what are the things they need to do for their mental and physical development.

“[Kids need to] prioritise. Have a routine: when you need to do physical work, when you need to be on social media, when you need to play video games, and when you need to do your homework.”

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