Everything you need to know about the Omar Abdulrahman loan move to Al Hilal from Al Ain

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It’s now a waiting game for UAE superstar Omar Abdulrahman as he prepares to make his long-awaited, blockbusting loan move from Arabian Gulf League champions Al Ain to their Saudi Professional League counterparts Al Hilal.

Intense negotiations continue between the parties to finalise the temporary switch for 2018/19.

Here, Sport360 delves into the Middle East’s most eye-catching move of the summer transfer window.

STATUS OF THE TRANSFER

Last weekend saw a move, first predicted in January, pick up pace.

Abdulrahman, 26, and his advisers came to a verbal agreement about a three-year contract extension at Hazza bin Zayed Stadium. When the deal is signed, bar any last-minute hitches, it will end the celebrated playmaker’s free-agent status and allow his employers to sanction a lucrative temporary stint back in the city of his birth – Riyadh.

Hilal had hoped to complete the operation for approximately Dh30 million, including wages. But competing interest from capital rivals Al Nassr is being used to leverage a higher fee.

Reports in Al Ittihad newspaper and in the Kingdom stated Al Ain’s return could reach Dh60m. This would be only Dh17m less than AC Milan paid Juventus last week to loan Argentina striker Gonzalo Higuain for the same duration.

This ensured Amoory was not present on Monday night at King Saud University Stadium when summer recruits – ex-Sporting Lisbon coach Jorge Jesus, Peru forward and Benfica loanee Andre Carrillo plus former Spain Under-21 defender Alberto Botia – were paraded in front of a packed audience.

Sources close to Amoory have repeatedly insisted his boyhood side are the “only club in the Middle East” he’s prepared to join.

IS HE WORTH THE MONEY?

By the lofty standards of the 2016 AFC Player of the Year, last season was one to forget.

He carried a foot injury into the 3-0 aggregate humbling by Hilal in the 2017 AFC Champions League’s quarter-finals. This knock would trouble him throughout the early months.

In a defining 24 hours in January, along with two team-mates he first broke curfew the night before the Gulf Cup final defeat against Oman. Decisive penalty misses followed in normal time and the shootout, marking a low point in a UAE career of grand achievement.

Domestic bans picked up for this incident, as well as injury, restricted him to just 25 appearances, seven goals and – an impressive – 13 assists as Al Ain won a first-ever AGL and President’s Cup double.

But bravura displays in the critical spring matches against dethroned champions Al Jazira – he scored twice – and runners-up Al Wahda showcased an enduring quality.

Bad aim: Abdulrahman against Oman at the Gulf Cup.

Bad aim: Abdulrahman against Oman at the Gulf Cup.

WHY DIDN’T HE MOVE TO EUROPE?

Ever since work-permit issues brought a frustrating end to a successful trial at Manchester City in 2012, links to Europe have never died down.

Benfica, Fenerbahce, Arsenal and Valencia have all been linked in the interim. Last summer, Nice had a loan offer rejected by Al Ain.

This time, advisers canvassed interest from clubs in France, Spain and the Netherlands. This was contingent on Amoory being a free agent.

It can seem like he’s taking the money, and the easy option, by moving to Hilal.

However, a sense of duty underpins Amoory’s links to Al Ain. Whereas his whole family – members of Riyadh’s Yemeni diaspora – received UAE passports in 2006 when he joined their academy, the Saudis would only give the valuable document to him.

A move to Europe this time would have seen Al Ain’s commitment go without full reward.

Foe to friend: Omar Abdulrahman played against Al Hilal last season.

Foe to friend: Omar Abdulrahman played against Al Hilal last season.

THE FUTURE FOR AL AIN

How do you replace a gem like Amoory?

This is a player who’s contributed 62 goals and 114 assists in 229 run-outs since 2008’s first-team debut for the Boss. In this spell, 11 major trophies have been won and defeat was suffered in the 2016 ACL showpiece to South Korea’s Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors.

Yet, a productive future was mapped out during 2017/18’s victorious campaign.

Egypt midfielder Hussein El Shahat’s mid-season arrival from Misr lel-Makkasa, initially on loan, proved revelatory. He registered seven goals and nine assists in 11 AGL matches as the title was sewn up in a second-half-of-the-season surge.

This form saw coach Zoran Mamic cede some of the absent Amoory’s responsibilities – he only featured in 13 out of 22 league fixtures – to him.

Rayan Yaslam seems to be a natural alternative for club and country. The 23-year-old scored four goals and crafted four assists in 20 top-flight appearances.

His previous best was 2013/14’s one goal and zero assists in four run-outs.

Succession planning in accident, if not by design.

Al Ain are yet to bring in any major additions this summer. They are not expected to use their windfall, at this stage, to replace fitful Brazilian forward Caio.

Some money could be spent on bolstering the side with Emirati recruits. Al Wasl and UAE centre midfielder Ali Salmeen, 23, has been linked.

The future: Rayan Yaslam in action for Al Ain.

The future: Rayan Yaslam in action for Al Ain.

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Habib Fardan makes Al Nasr homecoming as club show intent to mount AGL title challenge

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Habib Fardan (Picture credit: Twitter/@ALNasrSC).

Al Nasr’s cornering of the Emirati market has continued with the homecoming of midfielder Habib Fardan.

Fardan, 27, excelled at Al Maktoum Stadium from July 2009-August 2014 and was highly coveted when – the now defunct – Al Ahli won the chase for his signature. But he failed to live up to his promise in new surroundings, meaning his four-year deal signed upon arrival was not extended this summer.

“Al Nasr formally contracts with Habib Fardan for three seasons and the player will wear the No10 shirt,” the Blue Wave tweeted. “Welcome to the cradle of UAE football.”

The returning star will likely line-up alongside celebrated ex-France international Yohan Cabaye, recruited earlier this summer from Crystal Palace. They will be tasked with supplying Brazilian attackers Samuel Rosa and Iury de Castilho, recruited from relegated Hatta and Ukraine’s Zorya Luhansk.

A space remains open in their four-player foreign quota after Lebanon centre-back Joan Oumari last week moved to J1 League’s Sagan Tosu – the home of former Spain, Atletico Madrid and Liverpool centre forward Fernando Torres.

Last term’s fourth-placed finishers in the Arabian Gulf League have also made significant domestic moves.

Fardan’s Shabab Al Ahli Dubai Club were raided earlier this summer for imposing UAE centre-back Mohammed Marzooq. Their defence was then further strengthened by the acquisition of Mohammed Ali Ayed from Al Jazira.

Promising Al Wahda forward Mohamed Al Akbari has moved to Dubai, in part-exchange for reserve left-back Hussain Abbas.

In midfield, former loanee Al Hussain Saleh joined from Emirates Club on a permanent basis.

Great expectations will surround the ability of Fardan to reignite his career among his fellow arrivals.

UAE coach Alberto Zaccheroni has dropped him from his plans and only four goals were scored in 94 AGL matches for Ahli/Shabab Al Ahli.

Fardan had proved an astute pick-up by Nasr from Al Wasl as a teenager in the previous decade, going on to score 27 times in 72 top-flight appearances.

He also played a key role when a 25-year trophy drought was ended with victory in 2014’s GCC Champions League final against Oman’s Al Nahda.

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UAE superstar Omar Abdulrahman secures landmark loan switch to Al Hilal

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Months of speculation have come to an end after UAE superstar Omar Abdulrahman secured a momentous season-long loan to Saudi Arabia giants Al Hilal and simultaneously agreed a three-year contract extension at Al Ain, dashing hope of a historic European switch.

Abdulrahman, 26, had attracted overtures from teams in France, Spain and the Netherlands as a free agent once his deal expired at the Boss in July. But the pull of the Saudi Professional League heavyweights, his childhood side in Riyadh as a member of the Yemeni diaspora, proved too alluring.

Reports in the Kingdom have stated his name will feature in a parade of summer additions at King Saud University Stadium on Monday night. A Middle East-record €14 million (Dh59.5m) loan fee was required to complete the transaction for 2018/19, heading off an approach from capital rivals Al Nassr.

Aspirations about a landmark permanent move to football’s traditional heartland, which began with 2012’s trial at Manchester City, have come to naught for the playmaker thanks to the weekend’s concurrence about fresh terms.

Sources close to the 2016 AFC Player of the Year described Hilal as “the only Middle East club” he would go to. A temporary move back to the city of his birth denies Amoory the possibility of playing in December’s Club World Cup in Abu Dhabi.

It also bears similarities to the career trajectory of predecessor Ismail Matar. The 2003 FIFA U-20 World Cup Player of the Tournament never transferred to Europe, instead joining Qatar’s Al Sadd on loan in 2009 from Al Wahda.

In April, Boss chairman Ghanim Al Hajeri authoritatively stated his prized asset, Amoory, would be “staying with the club for next season, where we are faced with the most important of challenges.”

Abdulrahman has grown into a legend with the Arabian Gulf League and President’s Cup holders since he joined their fabled academy in 2007.

In a decade with the first team, he’s scored 62 times and crafted 114 assists during 229 appearances. A total of 11 major honours have been won in this period.

A star role with the UAE at the London 2012 Olympics led to a successful trial at City. Work-permit issues then scuppered a first permanent move for an Emirati to Europe.

Valencia, Hamburg, Arsenal, Benfica and Fenerbahce are among the outfits to further be attached to his name. Al Ain rejected a loan offer from Nice in July 2017.

Those contacted this summer were prepared to produce offers, on the proviso Amoory remained a free agent. Annual wages on the deal signed in February 2015 are estimated at Dh20m.

Al Ain would now be in position to demand a substantial transfer fee, despite last term’s domestic and international travails.

This included being ostracised and banned for breaking curfew the night before January 5’s Gulf Cup-final loss to Oman, a match in which he missed decisive penalties at the end of normal time plus the shootout.

But throughout his spell in the Garden City, talk of an eventual return to Hilal never dissipated.

The ascension of Turki Al Sheikh to the General Sports Authority’s chairmanship has led to an enormous injection of state cash into the national sport.

Hilal have used this largesse since the end of 2017/18 to attract esteemed ex-Sporting Lisbon coach Jorge Jesus, former Spain Under-21 defender Alberto Botia from Olympiacos and tie up a loan switch for Peru’s Benfica-owned forward Andre Carrillo.

Amoory had been missing throughout pre-season for the Boss, including the recent first-round elimination to Algeria’s ES Setif in the Arab Club Champions Cup.

A likely debut for Hilal will come in August 18’s Saudi Super Cup at London’s Loftus Road, against Al Ittihad.

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