Man Utd announce record revenue but write-off Schweinsteiger

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MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 10: Zlatan Ibrahimovic of Manchester United celebrates scoring his sides first goal during the Premier League match between Manchester United and Manchester City at Old Trafford on September 10, 2016 in Manchester, England. (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

Here, Sport360 breaks down the key figures coming out of Old Trafford.

Share with us your thoughts by commenting below, using #360fans on Twitter or getting in touch via Facebook.

– United posted a record total revenue of £515.3million, becoming the first British club to earn more than half a billion pounds in a single year.

– The club’s total revenue is predicted to rise to between £530m and £540m next year, despite missing out on Champions League qualification.
– Operating profit for 2015-16 was £68.6m, compared to £31.6m the previous year.

– United’s commercial revenue rose 36.3 per cent to £268.3m in a year that the agreement with Adidas came into play, helping retail revenues rise 207.9 per cent.

– Broadcasting revenue for the year increased by 30.4 per cent to £140.4m, primarily due to their participation in UEFA competitions.
– United’s net debt increased 2.2 per cent to £260.9m, with that £5.7m change pinned on the impact of exchange rate movements on their United States dollar denominated debt.
– Total operating expenses increased by 12.8 per cent to £436.6m and employee benefit expenses were £232.2m, an increase of 14.6 per cent primarily thanks to contract extensions and a rise in salaries due to Champions League participation.
– The exit of manager Louis van Gaal and his coaching staff cost the club £8.4m in compensation.
– United wrote off £6.7m as midfielder Bastian Schweinsteiger is “no longer considered to be a member of the first team playing squad”.

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EPL weekend: Five things we learned

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Contrasting fortunes: Pogba, Cazorla, Bravo and Henderson.

Pogba is unsuited to a 4-2-3-1

The £89.3 million signing had a game to forget in the Manchester derby.

Playing at the base of United’s midfield with Marouane Fellaini, Jose Mourinho had hoped the mix of power and height would help his side seize control. Instead, they were overrun.

In the second half, when they went 4-3-3, Pogba was given more freedom, and perhaps that’s the way forward.

Guardiola’s mistake in starting Bravo

Claudio Bravo had only trained twice with his new team-mates leading up to the heated derby day.

His horror show debut owes as much to Pep Guardiola’s negligence in starting the new man between the sticks than it does for the 33-year-old Chilean’s ineptitude.

The Spaniard has put his neck on the line in making the big call and at this stage, he’ll surely be worried by this early showing.

Son’s dedication pays off

Erik Lamela’s fine form last season meant Son Heung-Min was forced to settle for the bench.

There were times in the summer when he seemed destined to leave Spurs, but the Korean, who skipped international duty last week to train in North London, clearly still has a role to play after his double against Stoke.

He drifted in and out the game but showed composure when it mattered most.

Henderson’s turned it around

The Liverpool captain has struggled since returning from a heel injury and in an unfamiliar deeper role under Jurgen Klopp.

But there were clear signs against Leicester that he still has plenty to say at both ends of the pitch, slicing a through ball for Daniel Sturridge to assist for Liverpool’s second and clearing the danger in his own box on several occasions.

He also only misplaced two passes all day.

Cazorla is under-appreciated

The Spaniard provided the winning touch against Southampton but his influence stretches far beyond spot-kicks.

Cazorla is a continuity player – 94 per cent pass completion against Saints – mixed with a creative hub.

Arsenal are a slicker, more varied outfit with the 31-year-old in the side and he’s as vital to the Gunners as Mesut Ozil or Alexis Sanchez.

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#360view: Fortune favoured Bravo, who cannot afford repeat

Alam Khan 10/09/2016
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Use #360view to have your say on the topic.

As Twitter trolled Claudio Bravo for a disastrous debut, Pep Guardiola was left in the spotlight for more than just masterminding a vital victory over Manchester City’s arch-rivals.

A 2-1 success at Jose Mourinho’s United – to confirm a fourth successive Premier League win and 50th derby triumph – and the brilliance of Kevin De Bruyne was overshadowed by the Chilean’s display at Old Trafford.

“Claudio Bravo is terrible,” wrote former Arsenal hero Ian Wright in one of the more kinder statements to the 33-year-old.

Simple and succinct, though, the view of one of English football’s striking greats was shared by many, including City’s own worried fans.

For 41 minutes their side had been in total control, dominating possession, toying with the hosts, and deservedly leading thanks to goals from De Bruyne and Kelechi Iheanacho.

Moments later they were totally out of sorts, driven to panic and defensive despair by the performance of their new No1, a man controversially chosen to replace one of the club’s heroes in Joe Hart. Bravo was seemingly bereft of confidence and an understanding of the fast-paced game played on these shores.

It could turn out to be one of Guardiola’s most crucial decisions in his first season at the club. One that could make, or break, City’s season. Good, reliable keepers usually provide the foundation for trophy-winning teams, but Bravo did not look an ounce of that.

Bravo was mocked mercilessly after he dropped a routine cross from Wayne Rooney to allow Zlatan Ibrahimovic a 42nd minute goal that gave United hope when there should have been none.

And things just got worse as his footwork and ability on the ball, an attribute supposedly superior to Hart and the main reason the England international was allowed to join Torino on loan, were found wanting.

He could have conceded a penalty and seen red for a studs-up challenge on Wayne Rooney after an awful first touch under pressure, and was rescued by his defence on numerous occasions when he was caught in a flap.

Guardiola was quick to defend his keeper, bizarrely calling the performance “one of the best I’ve ever seen” and praising him for his positivity rather than reflect on his shortcomings.

It was a show of blind faith. This was a horror show that would leave even the greatest of managers fearful of the future.

Future opponents will look at this game and City should be prepared for aerial bombardment and constant pressing from forwards to force Bravo into more embarrassing errors.

A cautious United did not do this enough in the first period, even allowing Bravo to play a part in the opening goal for De Bruyne by starting a quick counter with a pass out to Aleksandar Kolarov.

That was an indication of why Guardiola signed him from Barcelona, but this is not La Liga where patient build-ups are often the norm and players get time on the ball.

English football can be an unforgiving place and mistakes are rarely forgotten.

It may be harsh to judge Bravo after one game, especially after having just a couple of training sessions behind him too.

He will get time to adapt and to improve the understanding with his backline, but he will be under pressure constantly. In short, Bravo will be under scrutiny more than he ever has been before.

It won’t matter what he did at Barca or how many titles he has won for club or country, but how he took the place of a City legend and how he measures up to his predecessor.

With Guardiola’s judgment and reputation on the line, Bravo cannot afford to fail. This was an occasion and win that he, and the City boss, got away with. He might not be so fortunate next time.

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