Tottenham and Liverpool player ratings as Harry Kane and Dele Alli get 8s

Mark Bryans 22/10/2017
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Tottenham put in a dominant performance at Wembley to record a 4-1 win over Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool side, thanks to a Harry Kane brace.

Here are the Player Ratings for both the sides.

TOTTENHAM

HUGO LLORIS: Nothing the France international could do about the Liverpool goal and he was made to work in the closing stages, with a superb stop to keep out Philippe Coutinho in the second half. 7 (out of 10)

KIERAN TRIPPIER: Covered plenty of ground up and down the right flank and his free-kick led to Kane scoring Tottenham’s fourth goal. 7

TOBY ALDERWEIRELD: Typical, stable performance from the Spurs man – the kind Liverpool fans must be praying for from their own defence. 7

DAVINSON SANCHEZ: Being allowed to slowly adapt to life in England with two stalwarts either side of him. 7

JAN VERTONGHEN: He and Aurier were caught out for Salah’s goal but other than that it was a good outing for the Belgian. 7

SERGE AURIER: Easily beaten to the ball by Salah for Liverpool’s goal but a decent performance from the summer arrival. 6

HARRY WINKS: Less of an eye-catching display than his performance at the Bernabeu in midweek but the England international is earning his stripes in this side. 7

Dele Alli

Dele Alli

CHRISTIAN ERIKSEN: Makes this potent Tottenham attack tick and was pulling the strings once again here. 8

DELE ALLI: Played in a similar position at Real Madrid and still offers a threat from deep. 8
SONG HEUNG-MIN: Took his goal well and was unlucky to hit the bar soon after – had both Lovren and Matip panicking all afternoon. 8

HARRY KANE: Scored twice and was a constant threat to a shaky Liverpool defence but ended the afternoon being substituted after seemingly tweaking his hamstring. 8

SUBSTITUTES

MOUSSA SISSOKO (for Son, 69): Spent the majority of his time on the back foot as Liverpool looked to reduce the deficit in the closing stages. 6

ERIC DIER (for Eriksen, 80): A move from Mauricio Pochettino to keep things tight at the back in the closing stages. 5

FERNANDO LLORENTE (For Kane, 87): Introduced as Kane looked to struggle with a slight knock. 5

LIVERPOOL

Liverpool

SIMON MIGNOLET: Could have done better with the first and gift-wrapped Kane’s second as he failed to claim a routine free-kick. Remains rather a liability. 5

JOE GOMES: Moved to centre-back after Jurgen Klopp’s early tactical switch but could do nothing to stem the flow of tottenham attacks. 6

JOEL MATIP: Not quite as bad as his central defensive partner but made his own errors on a tough afternoon for the Liverpool backline, including heading straight to Alli to add the third before half-time. 4

DEJAN LOVREN: Another terrible outing for the defender, who failed to make two headers which ultimately led to tottenham’s opening goals. Hauled off with half an hour gone. 3

ALBERTO MORENO: Made a couple of telling interceptions but is more effective in an attacking capacity. 6

JORDAN HENDERSON: Liverpool’s captain struggled to get a foothold in the midfield battle but did play a sumptuous pass to tee up Salah for his goal. 6

JAMES MILNER: The usual high level of endeavour but was caught out by the run of Son for tottenham’s crucial second goal. 5

EMRE CAN: Shifted to a less familiar role at right-back when Lovren was hooked, and did a job there. 6

Mohamed Salah

Mohamed Salah

MOHAMED SALAH: The one-time Tottenham target took his goal well to get Liverpool back into the game but it was not to be. 7

PHILIPPE COUTINHO: Has been in superb form since returning from injury but was kept quiet here – did test Lloris with a typical curling effort from the edge of the box. 6

ROBERTO FIRMINO: Arguably his most telling contribution was clearing an effort off his own goal-line, only for Kane to follow up and score Tottenham’s fourth. 5

SUBSTITUTES

ALEX OXLADE-CHAMBERLAIN (for Lovren, 31): The ex-Arsenal man was jeered as he replaced Lovren but showed glimpses of the player Klopp was so keen to bring in from the Emirates Stadium. 6

DANIEL STURRIDGE (for Firmino, 76): Little chance to do anything that would lead to a remarkable swing in the fortunes of his side. 5

Provided by Press Association Sport

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Harry Kane is more than just goals and other things learned as Spurs hammer Liverpool

James Piercy 22/10/2017
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Harry Kane capitalised on another defensive horror show from Liverpool by scoring twice for Tottenham in a ruthless 4-1 victory.

Dejan Lovren was substituted after just 31 minutes at Wembley but he was not the only one guilty of kamikaze defending, with Simon Mignolet and Joel Matip both major contributors to Spurs’ goal flurry.

Kane and Son Heung-min took full advantage with an early double before Mohamed Salah pulled one back for Liverpool. Dele Alli and Kane, however, struck either side of half-time to put the result beyond doubt.

Here are three things learned from Wembley.

THIS IS ON KLOPP

Dejan Lovren delivered one of the poorest 30 minutes by a defender in Premier League history. His errors for a professional footballer were inexcusable. Awful positioning, no awareness of the defensive line and the sort of misjudgement of a ball in flight that would make a schoolboy embarrassed.

Joel Matip improved slightly once the Croatian was replaced but he too also delivered an error-ridden performance, summed up by a weak header straight to Dele Alli for Tottenham’s killer third just before half-time.

Credit to the Reds manager for making the change and switching to a back-three but the damage had long been done and he got it horribly wrong. Although, the seeds have been sown for a long time. This wasn’t the first time an opposition side have repeatedly attacked Liverpool down the left-hand channel in between Lovren and Alberto Moreno, and it won’t be the last.

Because the same problems remain and it’s very hard to see anything changing, based on previous and current evidence.

In the summer, Klopp was repeatedly asked about his lack of reinforcements in an area of the field which was a clear weakness. His reply was to throw it out to the floor and ask assembled journalists to name 4-5 centre-backs that would improve them.

The Virgil van Dijk mess is a separate issue, but Milan Skriniar, Harry Maguire, Michael Keane, Jeison Murillo, Simon Kjaer and Omer Toprak are all good to potentially very good defenders who joined new clubs in the summer and would walk into this Liverpool side, yet were either not picked out or passed over by Klopp and sporting director Michael Edwards.

During his time at Anfield, just £9million has been spent on centre-backs by Klopp. Unless you are a defensive genius, and it’s abundantly clear, Klopp isn’t; you get what you pay for.

If these sort of performances are down to individual mistakes, it’s on him; if it’s a wider structural issue, it’s on him.

Klopp gestures during the hammering from Spurs

Klopp gestures during the hammering from Spurs

KANE’S GAME IS MORE THAN JUST GOALS

Harry Kane is a curious phenomenon in modern football in that he cuts through the hype traditionally applied to a footballer in his form.

English football finally has an individual rapidly approaching – if he’s not already there yet – superstar status yet there is still an element of the understated in how he conducts himself on and off the field.

For all his talents in front of goal, and given his presence and influence at Spurs, he could now afford to primarily play as a penalty box predator, committing little to the ebb and flow of the game outside the 18 yards where he comes alive.

But he remains a fiercely dedicated and willing worker for his team, closing defenders down, forcing mistakes and nearly always providing an outlet for the likes of Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli to find him with their passes.

He’s also improving as a creative player himself, his pass to Heung-Min Son for Spurs’ second was inch perfect with echoes of Eriksen and Kevin De Bruyne. Of Premier League strikers, he lies third with 10 behind Sergio Aguero (14) and Romelu Lukaku (9) in terms of chances created.

Kane is forever working on and improving his game, whether it be his weaker foot, the timing of his runs or what more he can bring to his team-mates. His all-round ability renders the one fundamental weakness to his game, a lack of pace, virtually redundant.

Harry Kane celebrates his second goal against Liverpool

Harry Kane celebrates his second goal against Liverpool

DELIGHT FOR DELE

It’s been a while coming but Dele Alli has another Premier League having not scored since August. For a player so prolific last term, it must have been weighing on his mind, especially when you are playing in a team so rich in creativity as Spurs.

Goals are also so important to his game as Alli is more Lampard than Gerrard in his approach and doesn’t perhaps offer the same continuity or consistency in possession as some of his team-mates. When he finds the target it tends to enrich the rest of his game.

Whether it be his goal (and a thanks to Matip is in order), or Spurs’ overall performance, or the fact they overwhelmed Liverpool in the middle of the park, Alli looked a brighter presence than in previous weeks, using the ball efficiently and one or two clever bits of skill (Emre Can look away now).

In a defensive sense he was also impactful, winning the ball back and making some key tackles in the middle of the park to disrupt any sort of momentum Liverpool were vainly hoping to build.

He is still 21 and we expect too much of him but that is the bar Alli has set. With Manchester United and Arsenal to come before mid-November, Mauricio Pochettino will be hoping for a few more timely inventions by the midfielder in front of goal.

Alli celebrates his goal against Liverpool

Alli celebrates his goal against Liverpool

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How Ronald Koeman fared in Everton's humiliating 5-2 loss against Arsenal

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Ronald Koeman

Everton manager Ronald Koeman is under increasing pressure after a 5-2 defeat at home to Arsenal.

Here Press Association Sport looks at how he fared against the Gunners.

TEAM SELECTION

Koeman made a bold move in handing Jonjoe Kenny his first Premier League start at right wing-back, although that decision and playing only one holding midfielder in Idrissa Gueye would have been popular with fans.

He reverted to five at the back and pushed Wayne Rooney up front alongside Dominic Calvert-Lewin with Gylfi Sigurdsson and Nikola Vlasic effectively playing as duel number 10s.

TACTICS

Koeman had to quickly point out to his defence the back line should be more of a three with the wing-backs pushing into midfield to try to stifle Arsenal’s early dominance.

After taking the lead Everton reverted to a deep-lying 5-4-1 out of possession with Rooney and Sigurdsson dropping off to deny their opponents space.

SUBSTITUTIONS

Tom Davies replaced Ashley Williams for the second half as Everton switched to 4-4-2 in a move designed to close some of the gaps in midfield.

The decision, at 3-1 down, to replace the hard-working Calvert-Lewin with Oumar Niasse drew boos from fans although Rooney’s withdrawal for Ademola Lookman was less controversial.

REACTION

Fans voted with their feet long before the final whistle to the extent they missed three goals – one of which was for their own team.

It meant the boos for Koeman were not as loud as they otherwise would have been had they remained until the bitter end.

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