I'm no saviour, warns Kylian Mbappe ahead of France's World Cup qualifier against Bulgaria

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Kylian Mbappe

Teenage sensation Kylian Mbappe warned he is “not a saviour” ahead of France’s crucial trip to Bulgaria in their penultimate 2018 World Cup qualifier on Saturday.

The 1998 world champions lead Sweden by one point in Group A with two matches to play, but France need little reminding of the pain inflicted upon them by the Bulgarians in one of the national team’s darkest hours.

Coach Didier Deschamps was part of a France side that – needing just a point at home to qualify for the 1994 World Cup – was stunned by Emil Kostadinov’s 90th-minute winner that sent Bulgaria to the finals at Les Bleus’ expense.

Deschamps’s current crop of players require victories in Sofia this weekend and at home to Belarus on October 10 to guarantee their place at next year’s World Cup in Russia.

But the Euro 2016 runners-up have little margin for error following an embarrassing 0-0 draw against minnows Luxembourg in Toulouse in their most recent outing.

“It’s a really important match, we have to go to Russia. It’s more than a goal, it’s a fact,” said Paris Saint-Germain striker Mbappe, who wasn’t born until five years after the Bulgaria fiasco.

“No that means nothing to me. I don’t know,” the 18-year-old grinned when asked if the name Kostadinov was of any significance to him.

“Mentally we’re getting ourselves ready to go to war,” he added. “Along with that of PSG against Bayern, it’s the most important match. It’s even more important because it’s an entire country, so yes it’s the most important match since the start of the season.”

But Mbappe, who scored his first international goal in August’s 4-0 demolition of the Netherlands, insisted he was merely a part of the puzzle for a French squad brimming with youthful talent.

“(I’m) not a saviour because there will be 11 of us on the pitch. That people expect more of me is normal. When you have good players, it’s normal that to expect us to make the difference.

“We have a quality group with lots of players. There’s no one player who makes the difference. The pressure is something I love. It gets me going, it’s a source of huge pride to be able to rise to tougher and tougher challenges.”

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Charting the rise of Japanese football and how the country's Ultras found their voice

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The international break usually elicits groans from many football fans who consider it an unwelcome distraction from club football, but Copa90‘s series on international football fans across the world is showing just how much fans love seeing their national team play.

Their latest installment took them to a surprise destination: Japan.

Most people wouldn’t associate the Far East giants with the culture of football ultras, but there they are, turning out to support the Samurai Blue with the passion to match ultras all around the world.

Yet the vociferous support are a relatively new phenomenon. Less than 30 years ago, Japan’s national football team, and the country’s entire football culture, was in the doldrums.

They would struggle to arrange friendlies with countries like Malaysia, let alone mix it up with the big boys in Asia. Football in general lagged far behind baseball, Japan’s biggest sport.

1993 is the year that began to change. First, American coach Tom Byer introduced his technical skills teaching program across Japan, to great fanfare, helping raise the profile of the game and leading to a generation of technically skilled football players.

That same year, Japan bid to host the 2002 World Cup, one they would win along with South Korea. And the J-League started in 1993, which slowly created a fan culture based solely on city and regional pride – which would later translate to national pride.

There were setbacks, such as Japan failing to qualify for the 1994 World Cup in the USA in heartbreaking fashion. But making it the next time around, in France 1998, gave Japanese football another fillip, which was followed by the great success of the 2002 tournament, when the sport took over the country.

Now, of course, the country is one of Asia’s footballing powerhouses, and the fans reflect that. Ultras Nippon grew into a veritable fan army, one that has influenced fan cultures elsewhere in Asia, and football has connected the various subcultures in Japan, from photography to fashion.

Most notable is how female fans have taken to the sport, showing that crazy football fandom is not just a man’s game.

Watch the video above to see the journey of Japanese football and the country’s ultras.

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Barcelona star Gerard Pique 'proud to play for Spain' despite defending Catalan referendum

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Under-fire Gerard Pique on Wednesday expressed his pride at playing for Spain, insisting he would continue with the Spanish national team despite his outspoken defence of the independence referendum in Catalonia.

“It is not incongruous,” said Pique of his intention to carry on despite his views on the wealthy northeastern Spanish region’s right to self-determination.

“I take it to the extreme, I believe that a person wanting independence could play in the Spanish team because there is no Catalan team and because that person has nothing against Spain.”

Pique, who was jeered by onlookers during Spain’s open training on Monday, added: “Why could a person wanting independence not play for the Spanish team? It’s a question I put forward, and it’s not my case. Why could he not?”

The Barcelona central defender on Sunday cast his vote in a referendum deemed constitutionally illegal by Madrid which was scarred by ugly clashes between voters and security forces.

Despite playing a crucial part of the Spain sides that won the 2010 World Cup and Euro 2012, Pique is routinely jeered when representing his country.

He has already stated his intent to retire from international football after next year’s World Cup, but insisted he could step aside sooner if Spain coach Julen Lopetegui or the federation believe his political stance to be problematic.

“It is best to continue and accept this challenge of trying to reverse (the criticism),” Pique said Wednesday after having decided against turning his back on Spain.

“I feel very proud to be in the Spanish team… It’s impossible to question my commitment. I’ve been here (in the national set-up) since the age of 15 and consider it as family.”

Pique went on to ask for understanding of his political views.

“We are players, but above all we are humans,” he said. “Humans have opinions and opinions come from our environment, where we live and through the information we get. It’s not possible for us all to think alike.

“I think that through dialogue and respect we always get to the right place.”

Pique added that he spoke to teammates “who think differently from me. In the end we come to the conclusion that there are things that could be worked out, but that’s not for us to do, we’re footballers”.

Spain play Albania in Group G of European qualifying on Friday and Israel three days later, with one win from these final two games likely to be enough to automatically qualify for next year’s World Cup in Russia thanks to their far superior goal difference over second-placed Italy.

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