Switzerland player ratings as Xherdan Shaqiri can't unlock Sweden in round of 16 defeat

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Sweden’s incredible run at the World Cup has extended to a quarter-final berth as they defeated Switzerland 1-0 in the round of 16.

Emil Forsberg scored the only goal of the game in the 66th minute at the Krestovsky Stadium when his shot from outside the box took a deflection off Manuel Akanji.

Here, we rate the performances of the Switzerland players.

SWITZERLAND

Yann Sommer – Made a great save down to his right to deny Marcus Berg and then at the death to stop Ola Toivonen’s free-kick. Not a thing he could’ve done about the goal though. 6

Michael Lang – Provided the width down the right as Shaqiri tucked in and combined well with the winger to work crosses in. A cynical push at the end earned him a sending off. 4

Johan Djourou – One of his better displays as he kept the errors to a minimum and made several clearances with his dominance in the air against two towering strikers. 6

Manuel Akanji – Unfortunate to get the deflection that led to the goal and was surprisingly overshadowed by his central defensive partner. 4

Ricardo Rodriguez – Played more like a winger and was a constant threat, creating a couple of good chances, with Steven Zuber drifting into central areas. Attempted a game-high 17 crosses though Sweden dealt with most as only five found a team-mate. 6

Valon Behrami – Made a couple of late challenges and picked up a booking. Was good in possession but couldn’t find the killer ball. 5

Granit Xhaka – Tried to dictate play in midfield and used the ball well while one rasping shot in the first half threatened but was always rising. 6

Xherdan Shaqiri – Was the go-to player for his side and while a couple of his deliveries had alarm bells ringing in the Sweden box, his overall play was rather predictable. 5

Blerim Dzemaili – Was a peripheral figure for the most part and blazed over in the first half from inside the area, wasting his side’s best chance. 4

Steven Zuber – Even more anonymous than Dzemaili as he only made 18 passes, although one of them was the cut-back for that chance his team-mate failed to convert. 5

Josip Drmic – An isolated figure up front, Switzerland seemed to play around him rather than with. Only had 22 touches over the 90 minutes. 3

SUBS

Breel Embolo – Added more of a threat than Zuber did on the left. Went close in the 80th minute with a header. 6

Haris Seferovic – Joined Drmic up front in the final 15 minutes and tested Robin Olsen with a header. 6

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Sweden player ratings as Emil Forsberg fires them past Switzerland and into World Cup quarter-finals

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Sweden’s incredible run at the World Cup has extended to a quarter-final berth as they defeated Switzerland 1-0 in the round of 16.

Emil Forsberg scored the only goal of the game in the 66th minute at the Krestovsky Stadium when his shot from outside the box took a deflection off Manuel Akanji.

Here, we rate the performances of the Sweden players.

STARTING XI

Robin Olsen – A couple of routine saves to make but nothing spectacular until Haris Seferovic tested him in stoppage time with a header. 6

Mikael Lustig – Delivered a superb cross to the back post for Sweden’s best chance of the first half. Otherwise careless with his passing but good in defence. 6

Victor Lindelof – Rock solid at the back and good on the ball. A good driving run in the build up to Sweden’s goal. 7

Andreas Granqvist – His incredible form at the World Cup continues as another inspirational performance kept Switzerland at bay. Impressed with his distribution as well. 7

Ludwig Augustinsson – Had to be alert as he tried to cope with Xherdan Shaqiri down his side while Forsberg often ventured forward and largely coped well. 6

Viktor Claesson – Lucky to avoid a booking for simulation inside the box. Created a couple of openings and intercepted well at times but also guilty of giving possession away cheaply. 6

Gustav Svensson – Deputising for the injured Sebastian Larsson, he managed to carry the ball forward on a couple of occasions and kept it simple with his passing. 6

Albin Ekdal – He was Sweden’s most composed in possession but skied a glorious opportunity over the bar when he stole in unmarked at the far post. 6

Emil Forsberg – Was the chief threat in attack for his side and involved in virtually all of their ventures into Switzerland’s final third. Looked dangerous on the break and wriggled away from defenders well. Got a the goal with a stroke of luck as his shot from outside the box was deflected in. 8

Ola Toivonen – Forced the keeper into a decent save with his late free-kick and squared the ball to Forsberg for the goal earlier. 7

Marcus Berg – A couple of great chances fell to him in the first half but his finishing let him down. 5

SUBS

Martin Olsson – Replaced Forsberg late on won the free-kick on the edge of the area that saw Michael Lang sent off. N/A

Emil Krafth – Came on for Lustig in the 82nd minute and helped in crowding out Breel Embolo on a couple of occasions. N/A

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A look at which World Cup was the most profitable with Brazil reportedly losing out on hefty amount

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World Cups are not only one of the biggest sporting spectacles on the planet but also one of the greatest drivers of economic growth in the host country, if utilised judiciously.

At the macro level, big-ticket tournaments like the FIFA World Cup provide at excellent opportunity for the host nations(s) to boost key sectors of the economy namely tourism, hospitality and infrastructure. Nations which already have a developed sporting infrastructure are well placed to make the most of the football fever.

But how much exactly does a World Cup benefit a nation? UK based credit brokers Money Pod have analysed the last four World Cups and arrived at the conclusion countries with already highly developed infrastructure were able to make a substantially bigger profit than the ones who had to build things from scratch.

According to Money Pod, the 2006 World Cup in Germany was the most profitable edition of this century with a reported cost of $6 billion for hosting the tournament resulting in an estimated economic impact of $14.1 billion, which works out an overall profit of $8.1 billion to the country.

According to the study, the German government’s tourism revenue rose by $400 million and 500,000 jobs were created in the lead-up to the tournament. The city of Cologne reported the number of visitors after the World Cup increased by 10 per cent.

The 2002 edition in South Korea and Japan came in second on profitability. The tournament cost $7.5 billion to host and resulted in an economic impact of $11.8 billion, resulting in a profit of $4.3 billion to the two nations.

The 2010 South Africa World Cup was not so profitable. The African nation spent $4 billion in hosting the tournament, pouring money on building six new stadium and upgrading infrastructure. While an overall economic impact of $5.6 billion meant a profit of $1.6 billion to South Africa, there has been little positive impact on their footballing fortunes with Bafana Bafana failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

The 2014 edition in Brazil was by far the most extravagant of this century. According to Money Pod, a staggering $14 billion was spent on hosting the World Cup and with an estimated economic impact of $13.4 billion, there was a loss of $670 million.

However, the bigger criticism of the Brazil World Cup is that after the tournament was over, some of the venues became deserted and saw hardly any matches held there with the Estadio Mane Garrincha in Brasilia converted into a bus depot.

Let’s see what Russia ends up with after dust settles on World Cup 2018.

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