McIlory, Stenson missing DPWTC not a problem, says European Tour CEO

Matt Jones 20/11/2017
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Keith Pelley had no problem with stars Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson missing the Race to Dubai season-finale – despite the fact world number 10 McIlroy was seen playing golf with friends in the week leading up to the DP World Tour Championship.

McIlroy had earlier announced his decision to withdraw from the final event of the European Tour season in order to recuperate after an injury-plagued year, while Stenson pulled out a week before the event after bruising a rib.

McIlroy, 28, was seen playing with pals at Emirates Golf Club, but European Tour Pelley said there was a huge difference between that and four days of grueling championship golf.

“Rory and I had the dialogue, we’ve had the dialogue about him needing the rest, about taking the rest of the season off,” said Pelley.

“Playing a match with your mates is completely different than playing in a competitive golf tournament. Playing in a golf tournament, getting up, practising, playing four days after you haven’t played, you have to definitely be ready.

“I’m totally comfortable with Rory’s decision that he made some time ago. Henrik looked like he was coming last week after he practiced and the very next day, he was practising again, and he got a twinge in the back.

“I said it to Henrik and I said to Rory, the most important thing for the European Tour and global golf is to have our superstars healthy and playing at the best they possibly can be.

“So I totally respect Rory’s decision. But it is a fundamental difference between hitting balls and playing a fun round with your mates than playing in a competitive tournament.”

And Pelley didn’t feel the absence of two of the top 60 in the Race to Dubai rankings had any detrimental impact on the tournament at Jumeirah Golf Estates.

“I think if you look at, (heading into the final day), the number six player in the world was leading and the number five player in the world was second.

“We would love to have Rory here. We would love to have Henrik here. But we have a very strong field that we’re very proud of.”

Pelley also revealed the European Tour is negotiating with local organisers to safeguard the future of the season finale in Dubai.

“We’re having discussions now, again, as we discuss 2019 and 2020 and beyond,” he said.

“This is a terrific golf tournament. This is where our players want to play. We are very fortunate for it to be called the Race to Dubai and to have somebody like DP World, who has been involved for many, many years as the title partner.

“Dubai is absolutely a critical part of our current success and our future plans. We believe that this tournament here at Jumeirah Golf Estates will be here for many years to come.”

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Justin Rose’s method marks him out as a new statesmen of the European Tour

James Piercy 20/11/2017
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Rose finished second in the Race to Dubai.

All week Justin Rose has carried an air of superiority around Jumeirah Golf Estates. Not in an arrogant, boastful or boorish way, far from it, but every day when the world No6 stood on the first tee at the Earth course he gave the impression he knew he was the best golfer among the 60 of the European Tour’s finest gathered in Dubai.

An understated confidence, few sportspeople carry so naturally.

And along with his own self-belief in his ability, there was the experience and form to back it up.

Even in the pre-tournament press-conferences, the difference in tone between himself and Race to Dubai rivals Tommy Fleetwood and Sergio Garcia was marked.

Garcia was largely pessimistic, with good reason given his considerable points deficit against the backdrop of having to switch clubs on the eve of the tournament, while Fleetwood preached a happy-go-lucky, just-pleased-to-be-here type narrative, also with good reason considering his surprisingly outstanding year.

Rose was as fixed and focused in what he said as he was in his application on the course over the next three-and-a-half rounds.

Along with a video showing him on the practice range at 5am, there was an illuminating quote into his approach on Wednesday when he said: “I think I focus a lot more on the skill of putting rather than the technique. By that, I mean green reading, and then performance drills on the green.”

To watch Rose with his claw putter was at times like some kind of performance art mixed with his own brand of trigonometry.

Every golfer has their own individual routine and ritual in approaching shots but Rose’s appears truly unique. The 37-year-old would at times appear to pick out objects in the distance with his eyes, adjust his body accordingly, then place his hands in line with the hole, before tracing the line of the putt downwards in the air using two fingers.

And it worked. For it wasn’t his putter which let him down in a truly remarkable turn of events at the DP World Tour Championship.

As methodical, thorough and efficient as his golf had been for 65 holes, something happened on the back nine that will take some getting over. The previous 27 holes from 10-18 on Earth he was a combined 10-under. He had one solitary bogey in that span, on the 18th at the end of his second round.

The monster 626-yard 14th where he found water and scrambled for a six, he had birdied twice and eagled on day one.

Of all the players in the field, based on how he had played near flawlessly, his experience, manner and confidence around the course, Rose was the least likely to suffer such a blow-up. He claimed he “hit the wall” as he discussed his near miss – a result, if anything, contextually closer than his second placed finishes in 2012 and 2014.

Maybe the sheer intensity he had placed on himself began to take its toll mentally and subsequently physically? This was a tournament he desperately wanted to win. The man’s an Olympic and US Open champion, though, he’ll know better than anyone. He’ll also recognise that golf is a sport unlike any other to the extent that even the very best win more than they lose.

And in defeat he was as imperious as he had been around the winding route of Earth over the four days. Immediately congratulating Fleetwood, a man he could well have by his side at the Ryder Cup next year, with a warm embrace.

It wasn’t necessary politeness or empty platitudes, there was genuine pride for a young Englishman enjoying the best moment of his career to date.

And while it was Jon Rahm who ultimately proved the best player in Dubai, Rose has no reason to be dissuaded from his own self-assessment, as subjective as that is.

But what was clear was a tangible feeling that there is now something of the statesman about him. Setting examples for the younger generation of Rahm, Fleetwood, Tyrrell Hatton, Matt Fitzpatrick and others, both in how he plays golf and his conduct off the course.

At the Ryder Cup next year he could prove to be Europe’s most important player, setting the tone for a clutch of European talent emerging taking on an outrageously-gifted American team.

A situation where more than sheer golfing ability will be required, and all his own qualities will need to be replicated by his
team-mates.

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Shane Lowry happy despite falling short at DPWTC

Chris Bailey 19/11/2017
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Fell just short: Shane Lowry

At one point on Sunday, while flying through the back nine, Shane Lowry turned to his caddie and wondered out loud whether something very special was brewing.

The Irishman teed off 90 minutes before the leaders but was back in the clubhouse right amongst them, having carded a 63 to leave him on 18-under par for the tournament.

One late Jon Rahm birdie denied him a crack at a play-off and a fourth-ever European Tour victory – though a 600,000 euro cheque, tying for second with Kiradech Aphibarnrat, made for a worthwhile consolation prize.

“That’s as good as I can play out there and to do it on the last day of the season is nice. I go away wishing I could have had a few more events, but that’s the way it is. I’m happy,” said the world No85.

“I actually felt in the hunt with a few holes to go. I said to (caddie) Dermot on the 15th that stranger things have happened, and if we can have a really hot finish here, you never know. I almost did. I had great chances on 16 and 17 but played them nicely, and under pressure too.”

Lowry has racked up the air miles between the PGA and European tours this season but is hoping a permanent American base can help kick-start his 2018 – and vault him into the Ryder Cup reckoning.

“I’ve played in America and I’ve played here and found it tough going back and forth,” Lowry admitted. “I felt really comfortable the last few months playing in Europe. I’m heading off to America in January again but we’re moving there this time so it should be a little easier next time, and I’m looking forward to that. This is going to give me loads of confidence going into my winter break.

“There’s only eight Ryder Cup spots up for grabs. The way I’m doing my schedule I’ve only got four spots to aim for really, so I’m up against it. But I’m going to do my best, I feel I’m good enough to be on the team so I just have to go ahead and make it.”

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