Patrick Reed edges Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth to win Masters

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Fending off epic challenges from three top rivals in a dramatic Masters final round, Patrick Reed captured his first major title Sunday, grinding out a one-shot victory at Augusta National.

The 27-year-old US Ryder Cup firebrand showed the same grit he displays in match-play battles, dispatching Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler and Rory McIlroy in an emotional battle that had spectators roaring.

“Today was probably the hardest mentally a round of golf can possibly be,” Reed said. “I knew it was going to be a dogfight.”

Reed, whose breakthrough came in his 17th major start, fired a 1-under par 71 to finish 72 holes on 15-under 273, one stroke ahead of Fowler with Spieth third on 275 and Spain’s Jon Rahm fourth on 276.

“Having to shoot under par in the final round to win my first major, it was awesome,” Reed said. “It was really satisfying.”

In addition to the iconic winner’s green jacket, Reed pocketed $1.98 million from an $11 million purse.

Reigning British Open champion Spieth, the 2015 Masters champion and twice a runner-up, matched the low final-round in Augusta National history with a 64, a closing bogey thwarting his bid for the biggest comeback to win in Masters history.

“I started nine back,” Spieth said. “I wanted to shoot a low round and see if something crazy happens.”

Fowler, still seeking his first major win, birdied six of the last 11 holes. He sank a 7-foot birdie putt on 18 to pull within one and keep Reed under pressure to the 72nd hole.

“We gave our all out there and made P-Reed earn it,” Fowler said. “I was happy to make that last putt.”

Needing a two-putt par from 25 feet at 18 to win, Reed gently tapped the first putt and saw it race four feet past the cup. He sank the comeback effort and pumped his fist in celebration.

“To have to two-putt the last hole to win my first major, it definitely felt right,” Reed said. “I was glad to end the drought.”

Reed’s last-pair partner McIlroy kept near on the front nine, chasing his dream of a Masters win to complete a career Grand Slam, but managed only one birdie in the last 14 holes.

“I just didn’t quite have it,” the Northern Ireland star said. “When I did have opportunities I didn’t take advantage of them.
“Tough day. But I’ll be back.”

Reed, who had never cracked 70 in 12 Masters rounds before this week, became the fourth straight first-time Masters winner and the ninth first-time winner in the past 10 majors.

Reed’s approach at the par-5 13th clung to a bank above Rae’s Creek, his title bid nestled with it, but he escaped with par to stay deadlocked with Spieth for the lead at 14-under.

Reed sank an eight-foot birdie putt at the par-4 14th to regain a one-stroke lead and parred to the clubhouse to win.

Spieth clipped a tree branch off the 18th tee and needed three to reach the green, where he missed an 8-foot par putt that would have seen him match the 18-hole course record.

Spieth was only the seventh player to shoot 64 in the last round, the first since Bo Van Pelt in 2012.

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Patrick Reed seizes Masters lead while Tiger Woods struggles to make cut

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Patrick Reed delivered an overwhelming performance under difficult conditions to seize a two-stroke lead after Friday’s second round of the Masters while Tiger Woods struggled but made the cut.

Reed, who shared second in last year’s PGA Championship, opened and closed the front nine with runs of three consecutive birdies then ran off another birdie treble on the back nine in shooting 6-under par 66 to stand on 9-under 135 after 36 holes at Augusta National.

“I just kind of kept myself out of trouble and let my putter do all the work,” Reed said. “I put it in the right spots so I could be aggressive with the putter.”

Reed’s only other 36-hole lead was at the 2015 US Open.

“I’ve been in this kind of position before,” Reed said. “It’s just another day at the golf course.”

World number 24 Reed is the only player since Ernie Els in 2015 to shoot birdie or better on all four of Augusta’s par-5 holes in each of the first two days.

Australian Marc Leishman was second on 137 after shooting 67 with Sweden’s Henrik Stenson third on 139.

Either Reed, ranked 24th, or 16th-rated Leishman would be the fourth consecutive first-time major winner to capture the green jacket.

Woods, a 14-time major champion playing his first Masters since 2015 following spinal fusion surgery, fired a 3-over 75 but reached the weekend on 4-over 148, delighting fans who stood 10-deep for a glimpse of the legend, whose last major win came at the 2008 US Open.

“It was about six months ago I didn’t know if I was going to play again,” Woods said. “I’m incredibly thankful to have this opportunity to play golf again. I missed it, and now I’m glad to be a part of it.”

At age 42, the four-time Masters winner revived “Tigermania” with two top-five PGA tuneup finishes after years of injury struggles, but has been humbled so far at formidable Augusta National.

“I didn’t hit my irons very good at all,” Woods said. “I hit so many beautiful putts. Nothing went in.”

The 7,435-yard layout tormented many as confusing winds and lightning-fast greens took a toll.

“The wind was up,” Stenson said. “When you have those kind of tricks playing out there it doesn’t make it any easier.”

Rory McIlroy, chasing a career Grand Slam with a Masters victory, and 2015 Masters champion Jordan Spieth shared fourth on 140, McIlroy after a 71 while first-day leader Spieth shot 74.

“It’s so tricky,” McIlroy said. “The wind should be south-southwest but every hole you get on it’s coming from a different direction. The wind swirls in these big tall trees.”

Top-ranked Dustin Johnson and 2017 PGA Championship winner Justin Thomas were on 141. Thomas would overtake Johnson for number one with a victory on Sunday.

More winds and cooler conditions are expected Saturday along with rain.

“It looks like just grinding out par on the weekend out here,” Spieth said.

Reed, an American college champion at nearby Augusta State, never cracked 70 at Augusta until Thursday’s 69, but he made up for lost time even though all three birdie hat tricks were followed with bogeys.

“I got a lot more comfortable with the course throughout the years,” Reed said. “I’m keeping myself in areas where even if I miss greens I can get up and down.”

Reed’s highlights included a 26-foot birdie putt at one, a 13-foot birdie putt at seven, a 14-footer at nine and an 18-footer at 13.

Leishman also began with three birdies and unleashed a tremendous approach at 15 to set up a 6-foot eagle putt.

“Probably put 40 yards of hook on it,” Leishman said. “I felt that was a time where I had an opportunity. I gave it a go and it came off.”

Woods opened with a bogey and took double bogey at the fifth, his approach soaring over the green into dense brush. He plunked his tee shot at the par-3 12th into Rae’s Creek, his bogey dropping him to the 5-over cut line.

Woods became the last pro in the field to make a birdie or better at a par-5 hole by two-putting for birdies from 40 feet at 13 and 35 feet at 15. He made bogey at 16 but two closing pars kept him in for the weekend.

Three-time Masters winner Phil Mickelson made the cut on the number at 5-over 149.

Spain’s Sergio Garcia became only the 10th defending champion to miss the cut after a 78 following his opening 81, the worst-ever round for a defending champion.

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Happy-go-lucky Tiger Woods roars again after superb Valspar Championship show

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Sunday evening in Florida and after four days of chaos around the course of Innisbrook Resort, the last roars on the 18th green finally fade for another year. The biggest roar of them all came from Tiger.

Of the 150,000 sell-out crowd that turned up to watch the Valspar Championship – most would have travelled home in awe of the stellar performance of Tiger Woods.

The 14-time major winner – continuing his comeback after four surgeries in three years – produced a sensational display to finish in tied for second behind winner Paul Casey.

Although the Englishman was lifting his first PGA title since 2009, Woods would surely have driven back to Jupiter on Sunday feeling satisfied having played his best golf in nearly four years.

Rounds of 70-68-67-70 will raise serious optimism for the rest of the season ahead – especially coming into the final round as a contender to win his first tournament since 2013.

The final-round 70 may disappoint him as his iron play and putting seemed off-colour until the 17th when he birdied a sensational 44-foot putt. But the poise of his second and third rounds show the maestro still has the finesse, confidence and skill to compete at the highest level.

Although he came agonisingly short of clinching his 80th PGA title, his finish in Palm Harbor was his first top-five result at a PGA Tour event since finishing in a tie for second at The Barclays in New Jersey in August 2013.

What struck home about the Florida native this weekend compared to any other tournament this year were the smiles, the pep in his step, the putting and his wedge play.

There was a genuine sense that he was really enjoying being in the groove, being in a finishing group on the final day and having the mindset that he could actually go on and win.

Considering the rollercoaster journey he has been on – from comebacks to injuries to positive rounds – this is clearly his best stretch of golf since finishing second in the Northwestern Mutual Golf Challenge in December 2013.

It’s hard to fault an athlete who has been curtailed by injuries and poor form. But to return from four surgeries in 40 months and show the same enthusiasm for the sport is impressive.

Woods’ devotion to fitness and perfecting his game over the years would always come at a price. He swung the golf club with ferocity, putting added pressure on his back, but always looked so composed, even in his moments of pain.

Watching Tiger this year, he cuts a contrasting figure to the one that skipped around golf courses worldwide during his halcyon days. He’s loosened up more, high fives players, stops for a chat and looks to really enjoy the buzz of playing again. Perhaps during his bed-ridden days recovering from back surgery made him realise the fun missed when he was so focused on winning tournaments.

For whatever duration Tiger remains competing on the PGA Tour, he is the biggest individual draw in professional sport. Everyone loves him.

We have LeBron James in basketball. Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo in football. Roger Federer and Serena Williams in tennis.

In golf, despite the emergence of stars like Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy in recent years, people still prefer to come out and see Tiger whether he wins, finishes 30th or doesn’t even make a cut. He is still the messiah and always will be.

The accolades clearly make him one of the best of all time – and although it is unlikely he will get closer to Jack Nicklaus’ haul of 18 majors – he will continue to have a significant impact on the interest of the sport and draw mega attendances at the various events he competes in.

Given the 42-year-old’s tournament rustiness, not many people have expectations of where he can finish at majors – the last time he competed at a major was 2015 when he missed the cut in three out of the four events (finished T17 at the Masters).

But if he is to contend again, he needs to improve his driving – his 49.86 driving accuracy percentage so far this year is way down on the 63.93 of 2012 – but given how early he is into his comeback, coupled with the back issues, that may need to be a later development.

First he needs to continue gaining confidence on the course, finding his touch with the clubs and returning to winning positions on a consistent basis. He’s doing all of those but it needs to be done consistently over a few months before we can argue that he is actually showing serious signs of progress.

It’s set up to be a hugely positive year for Tiger. He’ll compete at the Arnold Palmer Invitational this weekend and then step out at the Masters on April 5 where he is a four-time winner, the last of these victories coming back in 2005.

Even if Tiger doesn’t go on to win another tournament for the rest of his career he will still attract the crowds, draw the headlines, the big page spreads. He will still be that guy that won the US Open in 2000 by 15 shots.

There will be greater players to strike the ball for as long as we watch the sport, but none will leave a greater legacy on the game than Tiger.

It’s difficult to know where his comeback is going, but as a fan, his constant presence on our TV screens is a joy to watch.

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