Lifestyler with Josie McKenlay: Refuel and recharge

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Choose the right fruit and vegetables to get all your necessary vitamins.

Last week I gave a list of the nutrients required by the major organs and systems of the body for maximum benefit and improved function, together with a few of the healthy habits we need to cultivate.

This week I will tell you which foods you should try to include in your diet regularly to ensure a consistent supply.

Vitamin A – hearing, eyesight, lungs, liver and muscles: Eggs and fish, especially tuna; peppers, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, dark leafy green and cooked carrots; dried apricots, peaches and mangoes

Vitamin B6 – brain, heart, kidneys, bladder and energy: Eggs, chicken, beef and turkey; carrots, potatoes and avocados; bananas; peanuts, walnuts, oats, sunflower seeds, brown rice and wholegrain cereals

Vitamin B9 (folic acid) – brain, hearing, energy and prenatal: Tuna, meat, liver and milk; green leafy vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and mushrooms; dates and oranges, lentils, wholegrains, barley, brown rice and bran

Vitamin B12 – brain, hearing, eyesight, liver, digestion, muscles and energy: Salmon, tuna, shellfish, meat, liver, milk and cheese; fortified cereals

Vitamin C – brain, hearing, eyesight, lungs, heart, stable blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar control, healthy digestion and joints: Colourful peppers, radishes, watercress, onions, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus and Brussels sprouts; citrus fruits, kiwi, mango and strawberries

Vitamin D – brain, heart, lungs, bones, joints, stable blood sugar and blood pressure: Cod liver oil, tuna, salmon, sardines and milk; mushrooms; fortified cereals

FISH - A good source of vitamin D.

FISH – A good source of vitamin D.

Vitamin E – brain, hearing, eyesight, heart, lungs, cholesterol control and muscles: Almonds, hazelnuts and sunflower seeds; vegetable, nut and corn oils, wheat germ, spinach and wholegrains

Omega 3 – brain, heart, joints and cholesterol control: Flaxseed oil, fish oil, oily fish, oysters, soybeans, chia seeds, walnuts, fish roe

Iron – healthy muscles and energy: Oysters, chicken, beef, liver and tofu; green leafy vegetables, broccoli and cauliflower; lentils, beans

Calcium – healthy blood pressure, bones and joints: Dairy, soy milk, tofu, mackerel and salmon; cauliflower, most leafy greens, peas, beans and carrots; raisins, figs, rhubarb and oranges

Potassium – stable blood pressure, kidneys and bladder: Dairy and lean meats; potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, mushrooms, carrots, spinach, broccoli and avocados; bananas, dates, watermelon, raisins, prunes, apricots and oranges

Magnesium – stable blood pressure, kidneys, bladder and bones: Tofu, yoghurt, haddock and salmon; baked potatoes, green leafy veg, avocados and broccoli; grapefruit, lemons, apples, apricots and bananas; brown rice, oatmeal, wheat, sesame seeds and nuts

Water – every cell of your body: Our body is 75 per cent water. We lose around 10 cups of water in an average day, so we must ensure that it is replaced. Next time you have a headache, are constipated or tired, drink lots of water.

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Stay in shape with hip-hop dance classes

Thais Kelly 21/09/2016
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The Dance Project DXB.

Are we human or are we dancers? The Killers raised this question and the answer is still unknown. Yet, for those looking to endeavor into the world of dance and are full of questions, Nicole Olaivar, 29, Program Director at GoGo DXB has the answers.

“I started dancing at a very young age and was at a competitive level by the time I was a teenager,” says Nicole “My hyperactive and rambunctious character was welcomed and it was where I could be myself and throw all my energy.”

Nicole teaches hip hop dance classes, known as The Dance Project DXB, with GoGo DXB at Train Strength and Fitness. She chose this dance style because of the attitude and character it brings out of someone, which makes this type of dance so entertaining.

However, not all of us are extroverts, and shyness can be an issue for those looking to try dance classes. So, for those looking to find the courage to dance like no one’s watching, Nicole has compiled a list of tips that will have you popping and locking in no time.

1. BRING A FRIEND

According to Nicole, if you’re too shy to try a dance class alone, bringing a friend can be the solution. It will motivate you to show up to class and you can have a good laugh together.

2. DRESS TO IMPRESS

“To feel the most confident and to get the best fun out of your dance workout, wear an outfit that makes you feel sassy,” says Nicole, “Whether it be fishnets and shorts, crop top and low riding pants, or your favorite sneakers. Put a little gloss to those lips.”

3. GET UP AND GET STARTED

Nicole says that the best way to actually start dancing is to book the class and show up. No need to contemplate. “You love to dance? Then you should be with ladies who feel the same way.” This can be easily done through the GuavaPass app, where GoGo DXB offers The Dance Project classes.

PUMA GUAVAPASS GOGODXB - The Fierce Project Event 2

4. MAKE TIME

“For many ladies the biggest challenge is making time for yourself,” says Nicole, “Most of the ladies in my class are working professionals. Hectic work schedules, deadlines generally exhausted by the end of the work day. Freshen up, eat something light before class, swag out and get to class ladies!”

Once you ace the challenge of bringing yourself to your first dance class, you can start reaping the benefits. According to Nicole, dancing improves flexibility, stamina, power, style and grace.

“My favorite part about dance as a workout is that my choreography comprises of more than 50 ways to squat and lunge, so after just 60 minutes my dancers have completed over 1,000 squats and lunges. When they feel the soreness the next day, that’s when they realize the physical benefits of the class,” says Nicole

Besides the physical improvements that come from dancing, these classes are also a great mental escape and also help to improve confidence not just on the dance floor but in all aspects of your life.

“Once you have found a dance crew you can picture yourself performing with, you start to embrace your exuberant side,” Nicole explains, “You bring out your alter ego and your apprehensions go away.”

You can try one of Nicole’s The Dance Project DXB classes at 8:30pm on Sunday and Tuesday evenings every week, or by signing up using your GuavaPass Membership. Follow The Dance Project DXB and Nicole Olaivar on Instagram – @thedanceprojectdxb and @nicolegogodxb

The Dance Project DXB is one of the studios you can experience with a GuavaPass membership. GuavaPass is Dubai’s first and largest fitness community of its kind, offering an unlimited membership to group fitness classes at over 60 top studios across the city. Take advantage of their GuavaPass Ramadan Promotion with 25% off your first month.

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Why stretching is so important post-training

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If you’re serious about training then you need to be disciplined about your recovery.

Rest is one of the most critical components to any training programme, and, in order for muscles to grow and repair they need the sufficient recovery time.

For any athlete, it’s important to realise that the greater the effort, the more disciplined you need to be outside of training.

If you’re playing football, for example, and have a game on Friday morning then don’t be doing a heavy weights session the day before.

Our bodies aren’t machines and if you’re not allowing yourself the adequate time to recover then you’ll be stale and lethargic in your next training session.

Away from the gym and training field, take in proper nutrition and plenty of water to help energy levels and mental health.

If you want a piece of chocolate one night a week, have one. Don’t completely cut out unhealthy food as you need to reward yourself for hard work.

In addition, sleep helps provide muscular recovery. It’s recommended to have between six and eight hours of sleep a night. If you care about your health and fitness, then trying to get by on four hours sleep a night isn’t going to work, and it’ll affect your productivity in the office also.

We can’t tweak everything in our lives so aim to make small changes that you feel can benefit a better you!

FINAL TIP: Include some static stretching on your days off to aid muscle recovery and keep the joints supple. Being inflexible around the football pitch is one of the worst feelings and you’ll continue to lack sharpness if you don’t do something about it.

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