Reebok releases first of its kind sports bra featuring new reactive technology

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Reebok are making waves in the sports bra industry with the unveiling of the PureMove Bra, providing women with more control and support during exercise.

In a recent global survey undertaken by the brand, the findings revealed 50% of women experienced breast pain while working out, 70% of women were wearing the wrong bra size and 20% of women didn’t work out because they didn’t have the right bra size.

Following such insights, Reebok MENA took the research a step further to investigate the trends of the region with a survey of a cross section of 150 Emirati and expat women.

The outcome was equally as disheartening at a local level with 30% of women experiencing breast pain whilst exercising.

45% of local respondents weren’t confident they were wearing the right size sports bra with the majority also maintaining that the item is more important than trainers in ensuring a comfortable workout.

The PureMove Bra will be available in an extended range of 10 unique sizes, aimed to specifically address consumer feedback around the industry’s lack of solutions for those who find themselves in between standard sports bra sizing.

The size range includes: XS, XS+, S, S+, M, M+, L, L+, XL, XL+, designed to help ensure a more tailored fit for wearers.

Speaking on the launch of the Pure Move bra Barbara Ebersberger, VP Performance Apparel at Reebok said:

“We could not be prouder to come to market with a product that breaks down barriers in a category that has dissatisfied consumers for far too long, lacking any true technological advancements.

“Innovation has always been in Reebok’s DNA and placing an emphasis on transforming and improving one of the most important fitness garments for women is no exception.”

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Classpass lands in Dubai - Marhaba to the world’s largest fitness network

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The ClassPass team readies for Dubai launch - (L-R) Ashley Kent, Country Manager, UAE; Sophie Pless, General Manager, International Expansion; Fritz Lanman, CEO; Chloe Ross, VP, International

ClassPass, the leading fitness membership in the world, will launch in Dubai this October with new members in the city immediately earning one months’ free access to a diverse cross-section of fitness and exercise classes.

Having launched in New York City in 2013, ClassPass’ aggressive global expansion sees Dubai follow hot-on-the-heels of its successful debut in Singapore last month.

Now operational in more than 50 cities worldwide, ClassPass counts an existing global network of more than 10,000 studios and gyms available on its platform – with today’s travel hungry users able to tap into the entire global network through one Dubai-based subscription.

“We couldn’t be more thrilled to launch in Dubai; a fast-paced and dynamic city where studio fitness is booming,”  said Fritz Lanman, CEO of ClassPass, who is in Dubai this week to mark the pre-launch waitlist going live.

“We are excited to bring a completely different model to the market that we think is best for both consumers and studio partners.”

“Our Dubai membership will be underpinned by ClassPass’ long-standing proposition of variety, flexibility and value, while our objective is to provide Dubai’s residents with entry routes into the highest-level of premium gyms and studios in the city.”

Whether Dubai residents are CrossFit enthusiasts, yoga gurus or aspiring boxers, ClassPass allows its users to book fitness classes in different gyms and studios directly via a centralized app.

Offering flexible membership options with set monthly fees, ClassPass boasts a diverse wealth of exercise experiences at exclusive studios across Dubai – from High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), barre, spin and yoga, to Pilates, strength training, dance and more.

ClassPass is currently available in more than 50 cities across five countries including the US, Canada, Singapore, the UK and Australia, with Dubai part of expansion into seven new international cities by the end of 2018.

The company’s expansion into Dubai follows the closing of a recent round of funding which saw it secure $85 million in series D financing led by Temasek, an investment company headquartered in Singapore.

ClassPass has secured total funding to the tune of $255 million since its inception in 2013, allowing the continually-innovating business to fuel the future of fitness through the introduction of exciting new features designed for flexibility and convenience.

ClassPass will mark its Dubai launch with one free month of  classes for users who join the waitlist online at www.classpass.com/try/Dubai.

Fritz Lanman, CEO of ClassPass

Fritz Lanman, CEO of ClassPass

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The mental battle of powerlifting: Contending with heavy volume and fatigue

Alex Rea 11/09/2018
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Sport360's Alex Rea grimaces during training

Sport360°’s Alex Rea has teamed up with the guys at Desert Barbell to embark on a six-week powerlifting challenge, working alongside industry experts ahead of his first ever competition – Powermeet 5.0. In the video above, check out DB co-founder Patrik Hedqvist’s explanation of the three lifts, but for week four, we move away form the physical side of the challenge and into the mental game with Part I in this discussion. 

Progress is progress, no matter how little or small.

That banal quote has been swirling around my head throughout this entire process and particularly now as I zoom past the halfway stage.

For the first three weeks of this powerlifting programme, DB co-founder and powerlifting mastermind Patrik Hedqvist implemented what he calls the ‘accumulation’ phase.


Essentially, this involves high volume sets at around 70-80 percent of my one-rep max in order to hammer home good technique having rebuilt my form on all three of the competition lifts – squat, bench and deadlift.








It’s been brutal, and a completely different kind of struggle than anything I’ve ever experienced in my years of physical training.


Indeed, when undertaking the physique challenge earlier this summer in a quest to strip down to six-percent body fat, the battle was purely me against the number on the scales.


Now, it’s a totally contrasting grapple with the digits as it’s the gruelling volume of lifts to get through and the weight on the bar which forms a different dynamic to deal with.


Here's a look at what Alex had on his plate for week three

Here’s a look at what Alex had on his plate for week three


For the physique-style training, the programme was almost inconsequential because nutrition was the most prominent factor in cutting the weight. Hitting the gym was just a mechanism to entering a caloric deficit and ultimately, it was the lack of food which made that challenge so tough, not the training.


With the powerlifting, even though I’ve doubled down from hitting the gym six and even seven days a week, to just four, the toll on my central nervous system and my mind has been incredibly demanding.


Consider this, in a week block, squat, bench and deadlift made up roughly two-and-half hours of my previous bodybuilding programme, now it’s more like eight.


What this phase of my training has done, though, is eliminate the thought of numbers I want to lift on the competition platform because the focus is purely on the most efficient way of moving the bar from A to B.


Genuinely, I just don’t want to embarrass myself with horrific form like a rounded back on the deadlift or thrusting my butt in the air on the bench. It’s for that reason I’m pestering Patrik with videos of all my lifts and constantly second-guessing myself. Sorry, Pat!



But that admission leads into another side of the mental battle, which is learning to trust the programme, or to borrow NBA star Joel Embiid’s moniker ‘Trust the Process’.


At this stage, mentally I’m fatigued and little niggles are beginning to emerge, but remaining committed to the programme and having faith in Patrik’s plan is absolutely vital.


After all, repetition breeds habit and more repetitions leads to automatic reflex. Confidence will be drawn from the familiarity of nailing these lifts over and over again.


And besides, you learn to enjoy the small wins, like coming through five sets of six at 82 percent of my one-rep max on squat, thanks Pat!


There were times when I’ve been sprawled out on the gym floor, legs pulsing, chest panting and body battered in which I thought about stopping.


But then the metal on that bar is like a magnet and it draws you back in because ultimately, you know a big win is on the horizon if you keep your mind in the game.


COACH’S CORNER WITH PATRIK HEDQVIST (@borjetheswede)


What it takes to be an elite powerlifter


People might be under the perception that strength sports have a unique formula for success, unlike other sports at an elite level.


The truth is, the difference is slim to none. One can only come so far on pure instinct and/or talent, same as all other sports.


The rest is hard work and good planning. I’ve seen junior and sub-junior lifters, with talent out of this world, either stop lifting or missing out on their full potential, many times due to a lack of guidance.


Longevity is the name of the game and it’s important to remember that a lot of strength athletes reach their peak well into their 30s or even 40s.



Here’s three things to consider to become an elite powerlifter:


1. Long term goals


Look at the big picture and don’t get caught up in chasing dream results too soon. Strength gains will also reduce the higher the level of the lifter.


However, to become an elite athlete one must train like one eventually. Same as in all other sports. The difficulty here lies within the actual classification “elite”.


Is that the actual performance compared to others or the response to a given stimuli?


I claim the latter. Point being; train according to your own level and keep striving towards reachable goals. Do that long enough and you will find yourself in the elite.


2. Prepare to fight and grind but don’t compromise with technique


You can´t reach elite level without struggles, but you can’t reach there either if you are constantly injured.


Cold hard facts.


3. Manage fatigue and recovery


Does that mean take loads of days off every now and then? No. It means that you have a regime to follow which calculates fatigue and also allows a few weeks per year for alternative training.


Good sleeping patterns are perhaps the most important recovery tool of them all.


Remember that when you trying to get all pieces together. The important ones can actually be totally for free.



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