NBA

Boston Celtics player grades as Jayson Tatum shines with all-around performance

Jay Asser 24/05/2018
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Jayson Tatum did it all for the Celtics in Game 5.

The pattern of the home team winning in the Eastern Conference Finals continued in Game 5 as the Boston Celtics beat the Cleveland Cavaliers 96-83 to take a 3-2 lead.

Boston didn’t shoot all that well (36.5 per cent) and had stretches of stagnant offence, but they played like the more desperate team and came out with energy on their home floor.

Here are player grades for the Celtics.

Jayson Tatum – A

Offensively, we’ve seen better from Tatum. But as far as all-around performances for his young career, this one is right at the top. He had 24 points on 7-of-15 from the field, while grabbing seven rebounds, dishing four assists, nabbing four steals and swatting two shots. He came up with timely baskets and his aggression netted him eight free throws, but he was perhaps more impressive on the defensive end, where he caused chaos as a help defender and jumped passing lanes. He was maybe the best player on the floor despite sharing the stage with LeBron James.

Al Horford – B+

Another solid outing by Horford, who had 15 points, 12 rebounds and finished with a game-high plus-minus of plus-22. He only took nine shots, but he was aggressive from the early stages as the Celtics played through him in the post. Horford could have finished with better numbers if he converted a couple of easy looks, but it was still his best performance since Game 2.

Aron Baynes – B+

Brad Stevens’ lineup change was to insert his hulking centre into the starting five and the move paid dividends. With Baynes on the court, Boston had more size for rim protection and rebounding, which helped them hold the Cavaliers to 19 first-quarter points and jump out to an early lead. And even though LeBron James got the better of him on a few one-on-one situations, they were mostly tough, contested shots that the Celtics will live it.

Baynes

Marcus Smart – B

Smart didn’t have any real signature moments in the win, but his shooting was a welcomed sight as he hit 5-of-9 overall and 3-of-6 from deep. He also had four assists as his ball-handling in the pick-and-roll led to some easy baskets.

Marcus Morris – B

He was just as effective coming off the bench for the first time in the series, finishing with 13 points on 5-of-16 shooting (3-of-6 on 3s) and six rebounds. Defensively, he checked James on 46 possessions and held his own, allowing 15 points on 6-of-12 shooting. Four of those misses were from long range as he did well to offer resistance.

Jaylen Brown – C

Brown’s ability to get to the free throw line is what kept him from having a rough night, as he shot just 4-of-15 overall and 2-of-8 from beyond the arc. His aggressiveness can be a double-edged sword at times, as it was in Game 5 when many of his downhill drives ended up going into a crowd of defenders. And he still wasn’t able to take advantage of his match-up with Kyle Korver often.

Terry Rozier – D+

After hitting his first shot of the game – a 3-pointer – Rozier missed 12 in a row to go ice cold. He did make two baskets in the fourth quarter to help keep Cleveland at bay, but the Celtics were fortunate to survive a bad game by him, and that too at home.

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NBA

How the Cleveland Cavaliers’ attack of Terry Rozier has flipped the Eastern Conference Finals

Jay Asser 23/05/2018
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LeBron James backs down Terry Rozier in Game 4.

Weaknesses are nearly impossible to hide in the playoffs. Whether it’s the limitations of a player or the soft spots of a team, deficiencies are magnified over the course of a seven-game series.

Which is why as simplistic as it sounds, one of the main reasons the Eastern Conference Finals have a different complexion now than they did before reaching Cleveland is a single mismatch the Cavaliers have exploited over and over again.

The Boston Celtics defence has been great all season and in the playoffs, they’ve ratcheted up the pressure significantly at times. But Cleveland have found one method of attack that has given the Celtics problems.

Seemingly whenever Terry Rozier has been on the floor with LeBron James, the Cavaliers have run a pick-and-roll to get Boston’s guard matched up with James. Hardly anyone can match James’ strength and skill in the post, so it’s no surprise the 6-foot-2, 190-pound Rozier has struggled to hold up in those situations.

James has either calmly backed Rozier down and gotten easy baskets, or waited for Boston’s help defenders to lean his way just enough to where he can find teammates for open 3s.

Rozier only registered as the direct defender on James for six possessions in Game 4, but on those James was a perfect 3-of-3 and drew a shooting foul for seven points. In Game 3, James hit his only shot on Rozier and drew two free throws in five possessions.

Those stats don’t jump off the page and scream concern for Boston, but watching the games you can tell how much those situations scramble the Celtics defence.

The odd thing is, this isn’t something that started happening when the series shifted to Cleveland. The Cavaliers were going after Rozier in the first two games in Boston, it’s just that the Celtics managed to counteract them with the ‘scram switch’, which basically involves a weakside defender pulling the overmatched defender off the ball and taking the assignment, usually before the ball arrives.

Boston have added their own spin on it by waiting until the entry pass is in the air before committing to the switch, which allows a bigger body like Al Horford to corral James in the post.

That strategy worked well in the first two contests, but for whatever reason, the Celtics didn’t use it as frequently, or execute it as soundly, in Cleveland. That’s how Rozier was left on an island so often against James or Kevin Love or Tristan Thompson in Game 3 and 4, resulting in good looks for the Cavaliers offence.

One part of the solution for Boston is to simply communicate and rotate quicker. After getting burned repeatedly by mismatches on Rozier in the first half of Game 4, the Celtics adjusted at the intermission and looked more like the defence from the first two games in the third and fourth quarters – and it’s not a coincidence Cleveland scored 43 points in the second half.

In fact, the first two instances of the second half when Rozier was caught on a mismatch, Boston’s scram switch forced the Cavaliers into turnovers each time.

The Celtics are more than capable of getting out of those situations, but they can also help themselves by staying out of them in the first place.

Too many times in Cleveland, Boston was content to switch everything just for the sake of switching. Even when George Hill or J.R. Smith would run a pick-and-roll with James well beyond the arc, the Celtics defence would relent and give it to what the Cavaliers wanted by switching, instead of daring Hill or Smith to beat them off the dribble by going under the screen.

You can chalk that up to a few things: poor coaching – yes, even for the great Brad Stevens – youth, and lack of communication and trust.

Boston have been a different team on the road than at home in the playoffs for a reason. They’re young and susceptible to mental lapses and loss of composure.

If they can refocus on the defensive blueprint that allowed them to take a 2-0 lead in the series, they can win this game within the game – and as a result, this series.

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Boston Celtics miss chances, Kyle Korver shows he's more than a shooter and other takeaways from Game 4

Jay Asser 22/05/2018
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Kyle Korver dives for a loose ball in Game 4.

The Eastern Conference Finals are tied at two apiece after the Cleveland Cavaliers responded at home with back-to-back wins over the Boston Celtics.

Here are takeaways from Game 4.

Boston can’t get over the hump

As bad as they played and as many opportunities as they missed, the Celtics closed the deficit to a few possessions multiple times. They just couldn’t get any closer and they’ll look back in frustration at the moments where they could have capitalised. Boston missed a total of 15 dunks and layups in the loss, with those misses turning into 15 points for Cleveland, according to ESPN Stats & Information. Just a rough night.

Korver comes through on defence

Kyle Korver is considered a one-way player, but he’s actually not as bad of a defender as his reputation would suggest. The sharpshooters showed off his defensive ability in Game 4 when he did well to limit Jaylen Brown and finished with three impressive blocks. Brown got it going in the second half, but by then, Cleveland had built up enough of a lead to where it didn’t end up mattering. Boston should keep attacking Korver, but it won’t always result in a bucket.

Cavs relentless picking on Rozier

It’s not a secret how the Cavaliers want to attack Boston’s defence. Terry Rozier may be a good perimeter defender, but he can’t hang in the post against LeBron James or Kevin Love, which is why Cleveland are going after him again and again after drawing a switch. Boston simply haven’t executed well in sending help from the weakside to get Rozier out of those situations and when he’s been stuck on an island, the Cavaliers have seemingly got whatever they’ve wanted.

Thompson makes life hard

He’s not scoring or filling up the stat sheet much, but Tristan Thompson has undoubtedly been one of the most important players in the series. His defence has really given the Celtics trouble and presented a mirage on mismatches, baiting players to attack him only to end up with a poor shot. When Thompson was the primary defender in Game 4, Boston players shot just 3-of-11 from the field.

Whistles throw off rhythm

The flow of Game 4 was just… off. A total of 49 fouls where whistled, which ended up hurting both sides and putting several players in foul trouble. There’s a difference between calling the game in a manner that prevents the play from getting overly-physical and calling touch fouls. Too often, the refs in Game 4 were doing the latter, which is particularly frustrating to watch and for players to play through in a hyper-competitive playoff setting.

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