NBA

Player grades as Stephen Curry torches Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 2 of NBA Finals

Jay Asser 4/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Stephen Curry brought the Oracle Arena faithful to their feet in Game 2.

The Golden State Warriors reached top gear to soundly beat the Cleveland Cavaliers 122-103 in Game 2 of the NBA Finals.

Stephen Curry hit a Finals record nine 3-pointers and had 16 of his 33 points in a scintillating fourth quarter to cap off a strong showing by the Warriors as a whole.

LeBron James, meanwhile, didn’t come close to matching his 51 points from Game 1, but had another near triple-double.

Here are player grades for both teams.

Golden State Warriors

Stephen Curry – Was scorching the nets with ease from beyond the arc near the end, when he was in one of his unstoppable zones. A

Klay Thompson – Didn’t look at all bothered by the high ankle sprain he suffered in Game 1 and contributed 20 points. B+

Kevin Durant – Wasn’t the focus of the offence but took his opportunities when they were there to shoot an efficient 10-of-14. A

Draymond Green – His defence on LeBron was exemplary and he did his usual playmaking as the trigger man on the other end. B+

JaVale McGee – Was a difference-maker in his 18 minutes as the roll man, while his length provided rim protection on defence. A-

Shaun Livingston – Still hasn’t missed a shot in the series after hitting all five of his attempts off the bench in Game 2. B+

David West – Did some of the dirty work but also hit a corner 3-pointer for some found money. B

Jordan Bell – Was solid off the bench in his 11 minutes to hold down the fort while the starters got a breather. B-

Nick Young – He let it fly in his 14 minutes but was 0-of-5 from the field, including misses on all four his triples. C-

Durant

Cleveland Cavaliers

George Hill – Started the game with an aggressive mindset but his offensive impact faded as the night went on. B+

J.R. Smith – Didn’t make up for his costly blunder at the end of Game 1 as he missed several open shots to finish 2-of-9. D+

LeBron James – Had a tougher time scoring than in the opener but was fantastic at finding his teammates, who could have done more. A-

Kevin Love – Even though he had 22 points, Love shot inefficiently again and was burned several times on the other end. B

Tristan Thompson – Was much better as a finisher than in Game 1 and did his part by chipping in 11 points. B+

Jeff Green – It was another rough game for Green, who seemed allergic to catch-and-shoot chances. C-

Larry Nance Jr – Provided some energy off the bench but also got cooked several times by Curry in switches. C

Kyle Korver – Didn’t make a single shot and was tied with James with a team-worst plus-minus of minus-18. D+

Jordan Clarkson – He’s nearly unplayable right now and Tyronn Lue decided to barely use him after a bad start. D

Most popular

NBA

Cleveland Cavaliers head into Game 2 of NBA Finals against Golden State Warriors with reason for optimism

Jay Asser 2/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
LeBron James was relentless attacking on drives in Game 1.

LeBron James may not be able to play any better than he did in the opener of the NBA Finals, but the rest of the Cleveland Cavaliers certainly can – and that should give them some optimism heading into Game 2.

There was a sense after Cleveland fell in overtime of Game 1 despite James’ 51 points that the Cavaliers had wasted a masterpiece by their leader and that winning in the rest of the series will only become harder.

While they definitely let the Golden State Warriors wriggle out of their grasp – in large part due to George Hill’s missed free throw and J.R. Smith forgetting the score in the final seconds of regulation – Cleveland showed enough to suggest the series may not be as lopsided as originally thought.

“Listen, we’re not broken. We lost a game,” Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue said. “You got to win four in this series. We understand that and it was a tough game for us. We played well enough to win but we didn’t, so now we’ve got to move on.

“They guys’ confidence is not shaken. We see what we need to do and how we need to perform to win. We have the blueprint and now we need to execute at a higher level.”

Though it was largely the work of James, the Cavaliers offence managed to keep up with Golden State’s prolific attack in spite of an off shooting night.

Cleveland shot just 10-of-37 from long range, including 2-of-12 on open 3-pointers (closest defender is within 4-6 feet) and 6-of-20 on wide-open looks (closest defender is 6-plus feet away). It’s not like the Warriors also struggled to hit shots they normally make as they were 6-of-15 on both those types of looks.

Throughout the playoffs – and all season – 3-point variance has been a barometer for the Cavaliers’ success. They’ve made 37.7 per cent from deep in their 12 playoff wins and 27.2 per cent in seven losses as their nights have often come down to one simple question: are they hitting shots or not?

The shot opportunities will continue to be there as long as James is around and especially if he continues to attack like he did in Game 1, when he took a page out of the Houston Rockets’ playbook and heavily utilised isolations. According to Second Spectrum, James had 28 direction isolations and 30 direct drives in Game 1 – seven and nine more, respectively, than he’s had in any game over the last three seasons (including playoffs).

James is going to be aggressive, that much is known. Golden State will have to choose between sending extra help defenders his way to slow down his scoring, which will open up shots for his team-mates, or to let him keep feasting.

Though James may not have to play better than he did in Game 1 for Cleveland to win, Lue isn’t putting any limits on his superstar.

“I hope so,” Lue said with a laugh when asked if James can be better. “I know it’s asking a lot, but we need him to lead by example, being aggressive, attacking the basket, and we know they’re going to come and help [on defense]. They’re a helping team and guys are going to get shots. If you don’t have a shot, put it on the floor and make another play. He did that last night and he’s got to keep it up.”

As disappointing as the end of Game 1 was for the Cavaliers, they’re still in position to shift the balance of power by stealing one on the road before the series moves to Cleveland.

One game in, they’ve already proven they can hang with the defending champions. Translating that to a win is the next step.

Most popular

NBA

LeBron James is let down by teammates as Golden State Warriors take Game 1 of NBA Finals

Jay Asser 1/06/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
J.R. Smith forgot the score at the end of regulation, leading to a major mental blunder.

LeBron James gave the Golden State Warriors his best shot in Game 1 of the NBA Finals and it still wasn’t enough.

The narrative of James having to face the loaded Warriors on his own was only strengthened in the opener as he single-handedly gave the Cleveland Cavaliers a chance to steal one on the road before succumbing to a 124-114 defeat.

Here are takeaways from the game.

Non-LeBrons don’t do enough

Only six players in the history of the Finals have scored 50-plus points. James is now the only one whose team lost.

LeBron delivered a special performance with 51 on 19-of-32 shooting in Game 1, but it went to waste as his teammates provided little help, especially in the closing moments of regulation.

George Hill let him down first by missing his second free throw with 4.7 seconds left in the fourth quarter, which would have put the Cavaliers ahead by one. That blunder was somehow topped by J.R. Smith, who grabbed the rebound on Hill’s miss and instead of putting a shot back up, getting the ball back to James or calling a timeout, dribbled out to waste time before the clock expired as he clearly forgot the score.

Outside of James, Cleveland shot just 37.3 per cent and only Kevin Love (21 points) and Smith (10) managed to get into double figures.

The Cavaliers have gotten away with this type of imbalance on the road to the Finals, but there’s no chance they can beat Golden State unless they get more contributions from their supporting cast.

Attacking weak points

Unsurprisingly, the end of the game whittle down to both teams picking out their preferred mismatch and going at it over and over again.

That meant LeBron seeking out Stephen Curry on a switch on one end, while on the other the Warriors did the same with Love.

Neither defence wants to give into that, but the Warriors will settle for what transpired in Game 1. By refusing to switch Curry onto James as much as possible, Golden State made Cleveland waste time in re-screening, so when LeBron finally got the match-up he wanted, the shot clock was already dwindled to keep him from patiently attacking.

The counter to that is two-fold. One, James has to look to initiate that switch sooner instead of mid-way through the possession. And secondly, he has to be more forceful coming off the screen to catch Golden State’s defence off-guard.

The solution to keeping Love out of those mismatches on the other end isn’t as obvious. Because of Curry’s ability to launch from deep, Love can’t sag off or stunt at the Warriors’ sharpshooter before retreating back to his man.

The Cavaliers can do one of two things to stay out of those situations: not play Love, or trap the ball-handler, which would leave the screen-setter with a free run to the middle of the paint. Considering just how pressed LeBron is for scoring help, the former is untenable. But the latter could be just as harmful. As is often the case against Golden State, there are no good options here.

Crashing the glass

Whether it was a concerted effort or a bit of randomness, Cleveland smashed the Warriors on the glass in the opener to win the rebounding battle 53-38.

Much of the damage was of the offensive kind, as the Cavaliers gobbled up 19 boards off their own misses, compared to just four for Golden State.

Cleveland also missed more shots, but even so, their advantage on the glass was a major reason why they had a chance to win the game.

The Warriors prefer to play small to maximise their versatility, but in Love, Tristan Thompson and Larry Nance Jr, the Cavaliers have players who can make them pay by snagging extra possessions.

Cleveland can’t match Golden State’s firepower or defensive tenacity, but by winning on the margins in an area like rebounding, they can give themselves a chance in the series.

Most popular