15 minutes with Adriana Jimenez

Matt Jones 4/05/2017
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Adriana Jimenez, who won gold at the FINA high Diving world Cup in Abu Dhabi last week, was so hyperactive as a kid, her mum knew she needed to find a solution – although most parents wouldn’t consider throwing their child off a 20m platform into the freezing water below to be a good one.

What started as a love for swimming soon turned into an aptitude for diving, and although she missed out on a place in the Mexico Olympic team for the 10m platform at Athens 2004, the seed had been planted.

Less than 10 years later the sport of high diving debuted professionally at the 2013 world Aquatics Championships in Barcelona and Jimenez has become one of the sport’s biggest names. She now hurls herself into the water from 20m and hopes to go to the 2020 Games with FINA asking the international Olympic Committee for high diving’s inclusion just days ago.

What’s it like to win in Abu Dhabi, with victory bringing you a first FINA medal?

I’m so happy. I was just focused on what I had to do and it’s a dream come true. I’ve been working to be here the last two or three years. It was a dream of mine many years ago and I’m just so grateful to be here. It’s a beautiful moment.

During the event we could see you talking, smiling and encouraging other competitors, both male and female. Why is that?

Well everybody has helped me and supported me a lot. Every diver in my life is special to me and we are a family. We’re not opponents, we are brothers and sisters. The most important thing for us is to be safe. It’s a very risky sport so it’s important to be safe and enjoy the competition.

Golden girl: Jimenez (top centre) at the medal ceremony in Abu Dhabi.

Golden girl: Jimenez (top centre) at the medal ceremony in Abu Dhabi.

How did you get involved in such a crazy and risky sport?

Well you have to be a little bit crazy to compete, for sure. In my case I was a 10m diver before but could not get one of my country’s three Olympic Games places for Athens in 2004. I was so close to going in 2004. Ten years later I became a high diver and did some shows in Belgium and Colombia. I found I had some talent for this so I took the decision to become a high diver. And the federation (FINA) opened up the doors for me.

Why did you decide to get into diving in the first place?

My mum wanted to find an activity for me because I was hyperactive when I was little. She had this idea for me to go swimming and then took me for a test to go diving. We never thought about a professional career but little by little my level increased and I started to compete.

When you’re 20m above the water, how do you put the fear out of your mind?

I visualise many times before of being there, and that helps me a lot. In that moment you can feel your heart beating so hard but you have to be focused and have love for what you’re doing. Not too many people are here doing it and we are lucky. I have to be focused and do what I do with love.

It’s a relatively new sport, becoming professional only in 2013. What do you see for the future of high diving?

Wow, it’s going to be amazing. I can’t wait to be a part of it and the sport becoming an Olympic sport. Because I think it deserves to be.

High Diving - 16th FINA World Championships: Day Eleven

What kind of training regime do you undertake for diving?

It’s hard work and we have to prepare well, with strength work in the gym. Also on dry land too, like running, and of course practicing diving, for sure. We don’t have facilities of higher than 10m in Mexico so we divide the dive into three parts. The take off, the middle of the dive, so the execution, and then the entry into the water. We train them separately and at different heights. It’s also a mental game too so there’s lots of mental preparation. I have as part of my team nutritionists, a psychologist and my coach, as well as my family. They’re part of my crew. It’s a job we do altogether and it’s working very well.

How realistic do you think it is that it will be an Olympic-sanctioned sport in time for 2020?

Hopefully it will become an Olympic sport by then. It has everything to be an Olympic sport.

It’s spectacular, you have great athletes, the audiences are great and the media coverage is perfect, the camera angles and pictures, so it has everything.

It’s also edgy and exciting. Do you think it can draw in a new crowd? Exactly. It’s a little bit out there. It’s an extreme sport and it looks great. All the athletes are very professional. It looks easy and pretty too so the public can enjoy it.

You almost made the Olympics before, so how special would it be if you could make it?

Imagine that. It would be magic. It’s another dream that I want to come true. It would be a special moment for me.

How do you like Abu Dhabi, with the F1 track and Yas Viceroy hotel in the background?

Wow. I love it. It’s one of the best places I’ve ever competed in and my favourite for now. It’s a nice mix, the track in the background and all the views of the beautiful buildings. It’s a nice environment and people are so friendly.

There are no Arab divers competing yet, but what do you think about the possibility of some joining in the future?

I don’t know. It’s kind of a new sport, so it’s growing little by little and we hope it will be an Olympic sport soon. But we invite people to join and hopefully we will have an Arabic member in this family soon.

Most popular

Related Tags

Related Sections

Team Abu Dhabi fightback to fourth at Rouen Endurance Race

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Team Abu Dhabi 35 in action at the 24 Hours of Rouen.

Team Abu Dhabi’s Thani Al-Qemzi, Alex Carella, Rashed Al-Tayer and Majed Al-Mansoori produced a sensational fight back to finish fourth in the S2 class and sixth overall in the 54th 24 Hours of Rouen on France’s River Seine on Monday afternoon.

The team lost their chance of retaining their Class S2 title when Carella somersaulted the Team Abu Dhabi 35 DAC boat after 267 laps and the crew plummeted down the rankings while the boat was repaired.

But that was the start of a stunning fight back through the field on the opening round of the UIM World Endurance Championship.

The race finished late on Monday afternoon and the team running out of the Abu Dhabi International Marine Sports Club (ADIMSC) was able to complete 678 laps after repairs and missed out on a podium finish by just four laps.

The overall race win fell to the French Team Nollet crew that included triple UIM F1 H2O World Champion and five-time Rouen winner Philippe Chiappe and his CTIC Shenzhen team-mate Peter Morin. Team Privilege 25 won Class S2 and finished second overall.

The Emirati quartet of Mohammed Al-Mehairbi, Faleh Al-Mansoori, Rashed Al-Remeithi and Majed Al-Mansoori raced in Team Abu Dhabi 36, with Majed Al-Mansoori replacing Rashed Al-Qemzi at the 11th hour.

The quartet actually led the race outright for a short period of time around the two-hour mark, but suffered a bitter setback after 86 laps when their UIM F4 and F2 reserve driver Al-Remeithi was caught out by the spray coming from two boats running ahead of him and his boat blew over.

Team Abu Dhabi 36 ran strongly before a crash after 86 laps.

Team Abu Dhabi 36 ran strongly before a crash after 86 laps.

The Emirati was not injured in the incident but the DAC’s left sponson was completely destroyed.

“This is one of the most famous endurance races in the world and both our teams showed their pace and determination and both were leading at one point in the early stages of the race,” said Salem Al-Remeithi, general manager of the Abu Dhabi International Marine Sports Club (ADIMSC).

“It’s disappointing that we were not able to retain the S2 class title, but the race was fantastic experience for everyone and gave our drivers the chance for valuable time in the race boats.”

Most popular

Related Sections

Exercise team spirit at Dubai Sports City

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Covering all bases: Dubai Sports City.

Dubai Sports City has recently launched a variety of corporate packages that provide individuals and teams with a tailored experience like never before.

The all-new offerings include team building sessions, development workshops and corporate event packages as well as use of state-of-the-art amenities available right in the heart of Dubai.

With its new corporate deals, Dubai Sports City aims to strengthen and bring together teams and colleagues by using the same sporting principles and values they share with professional teams to build success.

Packages are available across a wide range of facilities including the award-winning Els Club, ICC Academy, Football Academy and the Dubai Sports City Sports Village.

Bespoke packages can be tailored to suit an array of organisations wishing to benefit from its facilities — from the smallest of businesses, right up to global multinational companies.

Dubai Sports City facilities include:  

•      3 full size FIFA approved football pitches
•      1 full size air conditioned dome
•      2 full size international rugby standard grass pitches
•      400m athletics track
•      4 basketball, tennis & netball courts
•      2 full size ICC approved cricket ovals
•      1 indoor fully-airconditioned cricket facility
•      18-hole championship golf course at The Els Club
•      20 meeting venues
•      Numerous food & beverage outlets including the award winning Big Easy Bar & Grill and Kickers Sports Bar & Chill.

To find out more about individual, team or corporate packages please email: [email protected] or call +971 (0) 4 448 1555.

To find out more about Dubai Sports City please visit: http://www.dsc.ae/.

Most popular

Related Sections