IAAF president Seb Coe to investigate fresh bribery claims

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Lord Coe.

The city was named as host for the championships in 2011 after beating off the challenge of Qatari capital Doha.

Ed Warner, chairman of UK Athletics, last week insisted London had nothing to hide over its bid amid the ongoing IAAF scandal currently being investigated by French prosecutors. However, speaking on BBC Radio 5 Live’s Sportsweek programme Sunday, Warner revealed that his team had agreed to spend $7.2million to cover prize money having been warned they were unlikely to succeed if they did not, and that they were told “brown envelopes” were being handed to members of the IAAF Council.

Warner said: “On the morning of the bid, council members of the IAAF and senior people at the IAAF were telling us that we were behind, and we were behind because the Qataris had promised to pay the 7.2m-dollar prize fund for the athlete prize money which otherwise the IAAF itself would have to pay. They were saying to us, ‘Look, you have got to match that offer’.”

Former IAAF president Lamine Diack has already been questioned by the investigators in France, who also want to talk to his son, Papa Massata, named by Warner as being at the centre of rumours which emerged the night before the bidding process came to a head.

He said: “The night before the bid, a very senior person in the IAAF hierarchy told me and my bid team that they understood that certain members of the IAAF Council were being called upstairs one by one to a hotel suite to be given a brown envelope. Frankly, it seemed incredible to me at the time and so I dismissed it. But subsequently, we have heard that Papa Diack, Lamine Diack’s son, apparently was asking for 5million dollars from Qatar to support their bid.”

Qatar has denied any wrongdoing in its bids for either the 2017 championships or the 2019 championships, which they will host.

When asked if he was aware of the claims, Coe said he was not, but promised to look into them.

He said: “The French prosecutors are looking at this. I have already implemented a review of our financial, our marketing and our sponsorship arrangements within the IAAF, so if anything comes out of that nature, then clearly all those bids will be called in.”

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Warner insists nothing to hide over 2017 World Championships bid

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Athletics chief: Ed Warner.

The chairman of UK Athletics insists London has nothing to hide over its successful bid for the 2017 world championships and has promised to provide all emails, documents and phone records to investigators.

French police and the IAAF are investigating the bidding processes involved in seven world championships since 2009, including the 2017 event which is to be hosted by London after it beat Doha in the vote.

UK Athletics chairman Ed Warner has welcomed news of the investigations and said all documents plus computer and phone records connected to London’s bid would be made available to investigators.

He said: “All I know is that London’s bid was completely by the book and through the front door in a classically British way. We have nothing to hide and we would be delighted to spend any amount of time going through our processes with the investigators if that helps root out any miscreants.”

Asked if he would be prepared to make all emails and documents available, he said: “Absolutely.” He added: “It’s right that these things are fair battles and the right city wins for the good of the sport and nothing more. There has been a very unhealthy smell at FIFA with some of football’s World Cup bids and now it appears there may be some of that stench with some IAAF world championships – and that is very unpleasant.”

The investigation is expected to focus on any involvement of former IAAF president Lamine Diack, who was succeeded by Lord Coe in August, and his son Papa Massata Diack – who was employed by the IAAF as a marketing consultant.

WADA independent commission stated on Thursday that Diack junior “held a contract to exploit marketing opportunities in emerging markets” including Brazil, Russia, India, China, UAE, Qatar, South Korea, Mexico, Africa and the Caribbean.

Investigators are likely to probe any links between the Diacks and bidding cities from those countries – Daegu in Korea hosted 2011, Moscow 2013, Beijing 2015 and Doha are to be 2019 hosts after losing out to London for 2017.

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Lord Coe faces renewed pressure on his position after new report

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Fresh allegations have been made against the IAAF claiming senior officials must have known about state-supported doping within Russian athletics.

Lord Coe is facing renewed pressure on his position as IAAF president after a new report ruled that the IAAF Council and his right-hand man Nick Davies must have been aware of the scale of doping in athletics.

The second report compiled by an independent commission of the World Anti-Doping Agency into the Russian doping scandal said the IAAF Council – which included Coe at the time – “could not have been unaware of the extent of doping in athletics”.

It adds that Davies, who stepped aside from his position as IAAF chief of staff last month, was “well aware of Russian ‘skeletons’ in the cupboard”.

The report, announced at a news conference in Munich, states: ” The IAAF Council could not have been unaware of the extent of doping in athletics and the non-enforcement of applicable anti-doping rules.

“There was an evident lack of political appetite within the IAAF to confront Russia with the full extent of its known and suspected doping activities.”

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