Crawford wants Pacquiao after domination of Diaz

Andy Lewis 22/05/2017
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Terence Crawford lands a heavy right on Felix Diaz who struggled to cope with his power.

Terence Crawford dismantled the respected Felix Diaz with a display of such quality that it left you wondering why he isn’t already a household name.

The 29-year-old American toyed with Diaz – an Olympic gold medallist with a 19-1 professional record – like a child pulling the wings off of a fly, eventually forcing his corner to pull him out after 10 painfully one-sided rounds at Madison Square Garden on Saturday night.

Crawford, as is his way, effortlessly switched stances, glided in and out of range and punished Diaz from distance and especially on the inside. The rugged Dominican’s durability and determination kept him upright but the compassion of his trainer Joel Diaz was timely and judicious.

“I stopped the fight because I didn’t want him to take any more punishment,” the trainer said. “Enough was enough.”

It showed once again that Crawford, now 31-0 with 22 knockouts, badly needs a step up in class. Diaz is a sturdy, skilful fighter but Crawford is truly elite and you feel that only the very best could potentially trouble him.

One such opponent would be Manny Pacquiao, and ‘Bud’ admitted afterwards that it’s the fight he craves most. “I’ve been saying for years now. It’s the only fight we are really looking for,” he said. “But that’s not up to me. I’m a fighter. That’s up to my promoter, Bob Arum.”

Indeed, if Arum had his way then it would have been Pacquiao in the ring last night, not Diaz. The veteran Top Rank supremo promotes both men, and what better way to cash out your faded star attraction than to anoint his successor by having the younger man clobber him into retirement?

A victory over the 38-year-old Filipino would provide a big pay day from a highly-marketable payper-view event, legitimise Crawford’s stellar credentials and give his profile the mainstream boost it so sorely needs.

“Would Pacquiao and Crawford be a good fight, a big attraction? You bet your a** it will,” said Arum this week, before adding that he “felt an obligation” to make the deal.

It’s the perfect scenario for everybody – except Pacquiao – who at this stage of his career doesn’t need problems like that, and is far happier topping up his pension with soft touches like Jeff Horn, who he faces in Brisbane on July 2.

You get the feeling if it does happen then it will be on Pacquaio’s terms, in his very last fight, and at the earliest that might be next year. However, Crawford for once has an extremely creditable ‘Plan B’ in the shape of the awkward and heavy-handed Namibian, Julius Indongo, who sat ringside in New York.

With ‘Bud’ holding the WBO and WBC light-welterweight titles and Indongo the other two major straps – the IBF and WBA – the winner of their bout would emerge as the first unified and undisputed 140-pound champion since Kostya Tszyu in 2003.

“Indongo’s here, he came to my fight,” said Crawford in his post-fight interview. “Let’s get it on Indongo, wherever you are, let’s do this.”

Capturing all four belts in one division is such a rarity in modern boxing – it hasn’t happened since Jermain Taylor relieved Bernard Hopkins of his four middleweight straps in 2005 – that in itself it would be a significant accomplishment.

That could be the perfect way for Crawford to sign off from the division before entering the fray at welterweight, where he’d cause major problems for any of the top contenders. Competing at 147 lbs would then give him the chance to win a world title in a third weight class and enhance his legacy.

“That’s what we do it for and it’s why we bleed, sweat and put our lives on the line – to be remembered in the sport of boxing,” said Crawford, who is surely only an elusive marquee victory away from fulfilling that aim.

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Fight Club: Oscar finally gives fans exactly what they want, Canelo vs Golovkin

Andy Lewis 8/05/2017
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Canelo Alvarez (r) tore through Julio Cesar Chavez Jnr in Las Vegas.

Oscar De La Hoya’s reverential status with Mexican fight fans might have been tarnished for good had it not been for the ultimate ace he had safely tucked up his sleeve.

His Cinco De Mayo fiasco between Saul Alvarez and Julio Cesar Chavez Jr had just concluded to a chorus of derision when he made his big play, beckoning Gennady Golovkin to the ring for the announcement of a September 16 super fight against his man Canelo.

The mood changed instantaneously as attention switched from the fight nobody had wanted to see, to the fight everybody wants to see.

De La Hoya and all those involved in Saturday night’s promotion had been talking up this Mexican feud for weeks, using a tangible animosity between Alvarez and Chavez to give it the big sell.

But the powerful narrative couldn’t mask the harsh reality of this mismatch once the first bell had sounded and Canelo tore into his opponent like a spiteful child setting about a bargain basement piñata.

The gulf in class was reflected by the 120-108 whitewash on the cards, and Michael Buffer’s postfight proclamations were accompanied by audible venting from a crowd of almost 20,000 who had shelled out big bucks to watch a show which had peaked two hours earlier with Lucas Matthysse’s knockout of Emmanuel Taylor.

But then came the drama, a stirring video teaser on the big screens and Triple G’s entrance to the strains of ‘Seven Nation Army’. It was pure theatre and jeers turned into cheers as those in attendance quickly forgot about the epic swindle they had just witnessed.

Indeed, what did it say about how De Le Hoya viewed the Chavez fight that the Golovkin deal was signed in advance, and the Kazakh was positioned yards away ready for the WWE-style ring rush?

In fact, Saturday night’s event boiled down to little more than a lavish commercial for September’s middleweight showdown, with the humiliated Chavez ushered out of view to leave the tantalising sight of Canelo and Golovkin standing nose to nose for the first time.

“GGG, you are next my friend. The fight is done,” said Alvarez, playing to the crowd. “I’ve never feared anyone, since I was 16 fighting as a professional. I’m happy to give the fans another great fight.” Golovkin, 35, the unified WBA, WBC and IBF 160lb champion, replied: “In September, it will be a different style. A big drama show. I’m ready. Canelo looked very good tonight, and 100 per cent is the biggest challenge of my career.”

A venue is yet to be confirmed with De La Hoya touting all sorts of exotic possibilities. The likelihood, however, is that the lure of Las Vegas will bring the action back to the T-Mobile Arena, or the potential of a monster gate will see it land at the 80,000-seater AT&T Stadium in Texas.

De La Hoya said: “I’ve already had several calls from people interested in staging this fight. I have a missed called from Dubai. I have a missed call from the UK where Anthony Joshua and Klitschko just sold out 90,000 people. There’s interest from all over the world.”

First of all, Canelo had a score to settle. Class is often rooted at the heart of Mexican rivalries and this was no different.

Erik Morales relished using Marco Antonio Barrera’s privileged upbringing as an extra reason to froth at the mouth heading into battle and, likewise, Canelo made no secret that his dislike of Chavez was amplified by the nepotism his rival was afforded by his celebrated bloodline.

Chavez’s career has unravelled in the past five years but this seemed like his chance to right the wrongs, a 36-minute shortcut to respectability. A night when one authentic ‘Mexican’ performance could permanently alter perceptions.

As it transpired, he delivered the absolute antithesis. Canelo immediately seized the centre of the ring and punished Chavez with his jab. Soon came the right hands, the uppercuts, the nasty left hooks to the body.

Canelo could not miss and the combinations got flashier and more hurtful. As early as the third round it was evident Chavez wanted none of it.

Canelo looked magnificent, but in contrast to the pre-fight hyperbole, this wasn’t a defining night for his career. That comes in September.

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Tyson Fury targeting comeback in July

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Eager for a return: Tyson Fury

Tyson Fury will target a comeback fight on July 8, provided he overturns a suspended drugs ban at a UK Anti-Doping hearing on Monday.

Fury has not fought since beating Wladimir Klitschko for the world heavyweight titles in November 2015, due to a combination of drug issues and mental health concerns.

But in the wake of Anthony Joshua’s stunning Wembley win over Klitschko, Fury has returned to training and is intent on securing an all-British super-fight with the new champion.

Fury’s camp are confident they can avoid further sanction from UKAD, which banned him over a positive test for nandrolone in June last year, only to suspend the sanction pending an appeal and further investigations.

But Fury must also convince the British Boxing Board of Control that he deserves to win back his boxing licence, which was stripped after his admission he had taken a recreational drug, as well as subsequent mental health concerns.

Fury’s promoter Frank Warren told BBC Radio Five Live’s Sportsweek programme: “He has been having treatment and the view is that after nearly 18 months now he is mentally fit to resume training.

“The bottom line is we believe and hope the treatment has been successful and hopefully he gets his licence back because it is good for him to earn money as a boxer, but more importantly it is good for his health and well-being that he has something going for him in his life.

“Provided Tyson is OK he has said he would like to fight on July 8. There’s no problem arranging that, but the most important thing is he’s 100 per cent mentally well before he gets back in the ring.”

If Fury does win his case with UKAD, the return of his licence will be no mere formality, with the BBBC expected to take some time to consider a number of factors before deciding whether to allow him to fight again.

Warren added that ideally Fury would have a number of warm-up bouts before facing Joshua, despite the former champion’s claim he was so unimpressed with Joshua’s win over Klitschko that he could fight and beat him without a warm-up.

Warren added: “I honestly do believe that it will not be long before he gets his belts back – he’s head and shoulders above all the other heavyweights in the world at the moment.

“You look at the performance of Anthony Joshua which was brave, heroic and very, very exiting – but the difference in how they handled Klitschko was vast and Tyson was far superior.”

Provided by Press Association Sport

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