The numbers behind Abu Dhabi Tour 2017

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Abu Dhabi Tour 2017.

The third edition of the Abu Dhabi Tour and the first since the event was awarded WorldTour status proved worthy of the sensational field of top riders who assembled at Yas Marina Circuit last week.

As expected, the 2017 Abu Dhabi Tour was the biggest and best since the race’s inception – and one whose scale and impact is demonstrated by the facts and figures below.

  • 1 – as Abu Dhabi Tour, the one and only World Tour race in the Middle East
  • 2 – helicopters for the race provided by Abu Dhabi Aviation
  • 3 – editions of the Abu Dhabi Tour so far
  • 4 – stages, totalling 671km of racing
  • 5 – the continents represented by the athletes of 32 different countries
  • 7km – advertising banners in the start and finish areas
  • 15h42’21” – the total time raced by Portugal’s Rui Costa (UAE Abu Dhabi), winner of the third edition. He wore the Red Jersey powered by Al Maryah Island for just one stage
  • 19 – TV production cameras: 9 at the finish, 4 at the start, 1 in each of the two helicopters, 4 on the motorbikes during the race
  • 24 – the age of best young rider Julian Alaphilippe (Quick Step – Floors), who wore the white jersey sponsored by Abu Dhabi Sports Channel
Rui Costa celebrates after winning the final Yas Island stage of the Abu Dhabi Tour.

Rui Costa celebrates after winning the Abu Dhabi Tour.

  • 37 – riders from Italy, the best represented country, then 12 from Russia and 9 from Spain and the Netherlands
  • 41 – race press releases since November 2016
  • 42.715km/h – average speed of the 2017 Abu Dhabi Tour
  • 46.859km/h – the average speed of the fastest stage
  • 53 – the points of Mark Cavendish (Team Dimension Data), winner of the Green Jersey sponsored by Nation Towers
  • 54 – the dossard number of Patrick Konrad (Bora – Hansgrohe), winner of the Black Jersey sponsored by Etihad Airways
  • 68.8km/h – the speed of Marcel Kittel in full flight in Stage 2’s bunch sprint. Caleb Ewan maxed out at 65.8km/h, as measured by Velon
  • 70 – Mercedes involved in the race, all supplied by Emirates Motor Company
  • 73 – Nations represented by the media for a total of 121 journalists and 45 photographers
Marcel Kittel

Marcel Kittel after winning stage two.

  • 141 – riders at the finish
  • 158 – riders at the start
  • 100 – vehicles in total including cars, vans and team cars provided by Hertz
  • 184 – countries providing TV coverage
  • 475W – Tom Dumoulin’s peak power in watts as he followed Quintana’s attack on the ascent of Jebel Hafeet on stage 3, as measured by Velon
  • 844 – the number of participants over the three days of the Abu Dhabi Tour Challenge at Yas Marina Circuit on 5, 12 and 21st February
  • 1,360km – covered by team cars involved in the race, 800km by the organiser’s cars
  • 1,500km – approx covered by the Publicity Caravan all across Abu Dhabi
  • 1,945 – students attending the hour-long class of the Educational project powered by Abu Dhabi Tour in collaboration with the Abu Dhabi Educational Council (Adec) in February. The initiative focused on familiarising students with the history of the bicycle, the benefits of cycling and road safety.
  • 2,122 – total accreditations printed
  • 2,315 – articles published online about the Abu Dhabi Tour from 23 to 26 February
  • 3,200 – the number of nights of accommodation booked for the whole Abu Dhabi Tour
  • 5,200 – T-shirts given away at the Official Fan Zone at Nation Towers
  • 13,400 – kg of team equipment delivered from 25 different nations
  • 35,000 – Abu Dhabi Tour Facebook fans, +27% compared to October 2016
  • 100,000 – The total of UAE Dirhams in vouchers offered by Giant’s distributor ‘Ride Bike Shop’, during the raffles at the Fan Zone in Nation Towers and every day both at the start and the finish
  • 125,000 – views for the most successful Facebook post: the stage 2 highlights, with Marcel Kittel’s late burst to beat Caleb Ewan and Mark Cavendish

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Costa wins Abu Dhabi Tour for UAE Team Emirates

Matt Jones 26/02/2017
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The 22-year-old Orica-Scott rider clenched his fists and let out an audible roar as he crossed the finish line under the lights of Yas Marina Circuit safely in first place.

It was a nice way to end the Tour for the young Aussie after he raised his arms in premature celebration on Friday’s Stage 2 thinking he had won the stage, only to admit a rookie error that saw him pipped by half a bike wheel on the line at Al Marina which engulfed him in embarrassment.

Ewan admitted the error had been playing on his mind and he joked with reporters after his victory that he kept cycling well beyond the line just to make sure he had been successful.

“I think I sprinted past the line just to make sure,” he added, after claiming the final stage win of the Tour ahead of Team Dimension Data rider Mark Cavendish and Lotto Soudal’s Andre Greipel.
“It did go through my mind the whole race (not to raise my arms at the line), to make sure I sprint the whole way past the line just to make sure there was no repeat of Stage 2. “



It had been a nightmare start to the Tour for the youngster. A crash on the opening stage saw him finish well down the field, and then came his horrible mistake the following day.

Despite last night’s win, Ewan admitted the thought of coming away with two stage wins will stay with him for a while.

“I’ll forget about the crash obviously. There’s still a bit of disappointment at the fact I could’ve had two stage wins,” he said.




“I think it’s more disappointing that it wasn’t a fault in my form or performance, it was a really silly mistake and I think it will annoy me for a little bit, but it would annoy me more if I didn’t win today.

“But winning today and beating those guys will help me get over that al lot easier.”

Ultimately, Ewan was just pleased he could make up for Friday’s mistake with his hard-working team-mates.

“It feels great to get the win and repay my team for what I did on Friday,” he added.

“To be honest, after the (second) stage I was a bit worried they’d be angry with me but they all laughed it off. I think if I had done it again today then there would’ve been a problem.

“They’re a great bunch of people and they probably knew I was bashing myself up over it. They were joking around a little bit but it was all good.”


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WATCH: UAE Team Emirates win Abu Dhabi Tour third stage

Matt Jones 25/02/2017
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The win was a watershed moment for his team, UAE Team Emirates, who claimed a home triumph barely two months after being unveiled as the 18th and last team to enter the UCI WorldTour.

The 30-year-old broke with 6km to go, halfway up the grueling climb that signals the end of Stage 3.

Russian rider Zakarin challenged him but it was the failure of a bunch of high-profile stars that failed to catch the leaders that caught the attention, with Nairo Quintana, Fabio Aru and Vincenzo Nibali all trailing a minute or so behind.

Costa held off the challenge of Zakarin, finishing in a time of 4:34:08, seconds ahead of the Russian, while Team Sunweb's Tom Dumoulin gave chase but was 10 seconds back in third.








SUNDAY'S STAGE




  • Stage 4 – Yas Island Stage (143km), Entirely raced on Yas Marina Circuit

  • Alignment: 18:10

  • Start - KM 0: 18:15







The final stage is entirely on Yas Island. There are 26 laps of the Yas Marina circuit, each of 5.5km with three Intermediate Sprints as we count down to the finale. The first Intermediate Sprint is on lap 11 with 15 laps to go, the second at 10 laps to go and the last Intermediate Sprint comes with just five laps to go.

In 2015, during the Yas Island Stage, for the first time ever in a men's professional road race, live on-board bike camera footage was made available and used for live television race coverage.





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