Australia feared 'for their safety' after mass brawl with Philippines in basketball World Cup qualifier

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Philippine and Australian players engage in the brawl

Basketball Australia’s chief revealed the players feared for their safety after a mass brawl with the Philippines in Monday’s World Cup qualifier.

Players of both nations exchanged flying kicks and punches where 13 were ejected following the melee. It came after a Philippines player appeared to catch an opponent with an elbow.

Speaking in a press conference on Tuesday, Basketball Australia’s chief executive Anthony Moore said: “We had our players and team management and our coaches in fear of their physical safety. Are we going to be able to get out of here unscathed?”

The visitors kept their players and coaches courtside after the game and sought help from the Australian embassy to get the team safely out to their bus and their hotel.

“Our athletes and coaches actually stayed on the court for a considerable amount of time, (it was) the safest place for our players and our coaches,” he added.

FIBA confirmed both Australia and the Philippines will receive punishments.

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Brisbane Lions youngster Harris Andrews hospitalized with bleeding on the brain after crude elbow strike

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Team mates surround the stricken Harris Andrews

Greater Western Sydney’s Jeremy Cameron will head straight to the AFL tribunal following a sickening collision that left the Brisbane Lion’s Harris Andrews with bleeding on the brain.

Cameron was not offered an early plea for his elbow on Andrews in Saturday’s match at the Gabba, won by GWS 109-82, with the match review committee deciding he will face the tribunal on Tuesday night.

Andrews was hospitalised as a result of the incident and is being closely monitored.

He was rushed to hospital in the hours following Saturday’s 27-point loss having copped an elbow to the chin in an incident that caused uproar across Australia. (See it for yourself below.)

Cameron never looked a chance of winning the ball when he came in from behind at a marking contest and struck Andrews, who was moving back with the flight of the ball, with a raised forearm.

The match review panel classified that the incident was “intentional conduct, severe impact and high contact”.

Cameron is expected to be suspended for at least four matches.

“We watched the incident from all angles and came up with the view that it was to be graded intentional, on that basis that a raised forearm or elbow is usually conclusive that a strike is intentional,” said match review officer Michael Christian.

The Lions confirmed in a statement that: “Andrews was admitted to hospital late Saturday night after his condition worsened. After undergoing tests and scans, he was discharged and returned home Sunday evening.”

“Throughout this time the Lions Medical Staff have been in constant consultation with a neurosurgeon, who will re-assess Andrews in two weeks’ time.

“The Club will follow standard protocols around concussion this week and will regularly monitor Andrews’ condition.

“Our discussions with the neurosurgeon have been encouraging as they expect Harris to make a full recovery,” said General Manager of Football David Noble.

“He will have a follow-up scan in two weeks’ time, when we will know more.”

Andrews, just 21, needed four stitches to repair a cut on his chin from the collision but was said to be in good spirits once he returned to consciousness and even made an appearance on Brisbane’s bench before half-time.

He also approached Cameron after the full-time siren but took a turn for the worse later that night and was rushed to hospital.

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Blues pull a Queensland on the Maroons as NSW claim just their second State of Origin triumph in 13 years

Alex Broun 24/06/2018
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NSW celebrate their State of Origin victory

Perhaps the result was colouring his judgement but former Blues coach Phil Gould, who has seen a few in his time, called it one of the greatest Origins ever.

It’s hard to argue.

The ‘Baby Blues’,as they have been christened, were hanging on to an 18-14 lead coming into the final ten minutes, playing with one player short after James “Jimmy the Jet” Roberts had been sent to the sin bin for a needless professional foul on Gavin Cooper.

NSW were clinging on grimly as the Maroons pounded their line, it seemed just a matter of time till Queensland struck the killer blow.

But unlike what has happened almost every series for the last thirteen years this time Queensland were the team to crack.

As an almost speechless Maroons captain Greg Inglis said at the end of our game: “We had our chances.”

They certainly did but this time it was Queensland’s turn to panic, to force the pass, to over-hit the kick, to let a winning position slip through their fingers.

It was a curious thing to witness – the Maroons failing to win the big moments – as when you talk about Queensland you are talking about true sporting greatness.

Written off after game one after a poor loss in Melbourne the (usually) magnificent Maroons were all set to hit back in game two and set up a decider in Brisbane, which they would be hotly anticipated to win.

It was the same pattern of so many State of Origin games over the last decade plus, where Queensland claimed all but one series victories.

Fortune favours the brave in Origin and the team that has the confidence to play under immense pressure usually comes out on top – the returning Billy Slater gave the Maroons that confidence.

As Gould perfectly summed it up: “Confidence that comes from demonstrated ability.”

Usually NSW go into their shell and run one out – easy to pick off by the Maroons – and as Queensland raced to a 10-0 lead after just 20 minutes it looked like it was all running to script.

But rather than disintegrate, as they did in game three last year, this unscarred NSW team worked out how to contain Slater and somehow, against the run of play, took the lead into half-time 12-10.

We had seen this before as well – NSW led 16-6 at half time in game two last year but Queensland were still able to fight their way back to win 18-16 and go on to claim the series in Brisbane.

But again the Baby Blues broke the mold. NSW’s own version of Greg Inglis, 21-year-old Roosters centre Latrell Mitchell, was too big and too strong outwide and burst over to put NSW up 18-10 on 50 minutes.

Queensland hit back through a try to Will Chambers on 63 minutes to make it 18-14 and it seemed that it would just be a matter of time till the Maroons broke NSW hearts – again.

But somehow 12-man NSW held on, helped by the uncharacteristic mistake-prone Queenslanders.

Even the great Slater, perhaps unnerved by a huge Mitchell tackle on Cameron Munster on 52 minutes, threw a crazy forward pass which smacked of him taking a look over his shoulder.

But still it wasn’t over as NSW offered the Maroons chance after chance but again and again Queensland could not grasp it – and the Blues held on for just their second series win since 2005.

The momentum has decidedly shifted to the NSW side of the border and with youth and depth on the Blues side, it may take Queensland a little while to get the prized shield back.

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