Super Bowl LII: Philadelphia Eagles could look to trade Nick Foles and more fallout from Super Bowl

Jay Asser 5/02/2018
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Nick Foles has proven he deserves a starting job somewhere in the league.

Super Bowl LII isn’t even 24 hours old yet, but the fallout from the game has inspired some interesting questions going forward.

Here are three topics of discussion to keep an eye on as we head into the offseason.

Who will buy high on Foles?

Back-up-turned-starter Nick Foles just pulled off an improbable run to the title and aside from bringing the Lombardi Trophy to Philadelphia, the Super Bowl MVP could soon be netting the franchise assets to bolster a championship-winning roster.

The Eagles aren’t turning their backs on Carson Wentz, their franchise quarterback who was an MVP frontrunner before suffering an ACL tear in Week 14. He’ll return under centre when he’s healthy, with all signs pointing to that being the start of next season. And while Foles won’t be a free agent this offseason, there’s a strong chance he’s on another team by summertime.

For one, Foles’ stock will never be higher than it is now after he just proved he’s not only a starter in the league, but one who can win you a Super Bowl. And secondly, his contract is structured in such a way that if he’s still on Philadelphia’s roster come February 2019, the final three years of his deal will be void and he’ll hit a free agency.

Expect the Eagles to field plenty of offers for Foles over the coming months and strike while the iron is hot.

McDaniels replacing Belichick?

Somewhat lost in the shuffle during the craziness of the Super Bowl was a report by ProFootball Talk that “there is increasing chatter that Josh McDaniels will be staying with the [Patriots].”

While it’s nothing definitive, it is a bombshell nonetheless because McDaniels was expected to fill Indianapolis’ head coaching vacancy all along and leave New England like defensive coordinator Matt Patricia, who will take the Detroit job.

McDaniels refused to talk about the speculation after the Super Bowl loss, so it’s still unclear if he’s going or not. But it certainly wouldn’t help his reputation if he backs out of an unofficial acceptance of the Colts job.

But maybe McDaniels doesn’t care because he’s gotten word from Bill Belichick that the Patriots’ head coaching position will be open sooner than later. It would be a surprise if Belichick called it quits now, but in a couple years or so? That wouldn’t be out of the question at all. McDaniels could be happy biding a little more time.

Gronk spike no more?

The most interesting quote anyone with the Patriots gave on the topic of retirement after the Super Bowl defeat was shockingly Rob Gronkowski.

The 28-year-old tight end is at the top of his game and in his prime as arguably the greatest player at his position ever, but Gronkowski was noncommittal about his future, saying: I’m going to sit down the next couple of weeks and see where I’m at.”

You can understand where Gronk is coming from as he’s suffered multiple devastating injuries in his career and was just in concussion protocol ahead of the Super Bowl. Even with his size, he takes massive punishment from hard-hitting defensive players and plays a physical style.

But this isn’t the first time a player has publicly mulled retirement after their season ended in unsavoury fashion. The Super Bowl especially is an emotional game, which often leaves players looking inward in the immediate aftermath. It’s possible that after sleeping on it for a few days or weeks, Gronkowski will feel differently.

If it is somehow the end for Gronk, it’s been one special career.

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Super Bowl LII: Nick Foles and Philadelphia Eagles offence outduel New England Patriots

Jay Asser 5/02/2018
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Nick Foles carved up New England's defence for 373 yards and three touchdowns through the air.

Super Bowl LII delivered a classic, back-and-forth battle for the biggest shootout in the game’s history.

Ultimately, the Philadelphia Eagles made enough plays to edge the New England Patriots 41-33 for the franchise’s first Super Bowl victory, ending the reign of the defending champions who were seeking their third title in four years and a sixth championship overall.

Eagles quarterback Nick Foles earned MVP honours as he threw for 373 yards and three touchdowns, while also pulling in a receiving score to become the first player ever to both throw and catch a touchdown in Super Bowl history.

Here’s a breakdown of the game and how it was decided:

Defence at a premium

So much for the adage ‘defence wins championships’. Super Bowl LII was ruled by offence as the attacks of both teams were unstoppable for nearly the entire 60 minutes.

Check out the records that were set: Most combined total yardage in any regular season or playoff game with 1,151; most passing yards in a postseason contest by a single player with Tom Brady’s 505; most combined passing yards in a Super Bowl with 874, and most points scored by a losing team in a Super Bowl with New England’s 33. The 74 combined points were one shy of tying the record for total points, set in Super Bowl XXIX.

If there’s one person who can’t be blamed for the Patriots’ loss, it’s Brady. The Patriots quarterback couldn’t have been expected to perform any better as he threw for the aforementioned 505 yards at a clip of 10.5 per attempt, and three touchdowns. Facing a 10-point hole coming out of halftime, Brady and the offence responded with touchdown drives on their first three possessions of the second half.

When Brady truly got into a rhythm, he was picking apart the Eagles’ man coverage with ease. Danny Amendola, Chris Hogan and Rob Gronkowski all topped 100 yards receiving, much of which came on chunk plays with Brady taking advantage of double moves to beat Philadelphia’s aggressive secondary downfield. New England never had to punt.

On the other side of the ball, Eagles head coach Doug Pederson did a masterful job of play-calling to keep the Patriots’ defence guessing.

When Philadelphia’s offensive line often had a numbers advantage against New England’s front, the ground game had large holes to run through and finished with 164 yards on 6.07 yards per rush.

The air attack, meanwhile, didn’t feature as many RPOs (run-pass options) as expected, with the Eagles instead having plenty of success out of their mesh/wheel concept, which features shallow crossing routes and the running back angling out of the backfield and down the sidelines. Some of the game’s most important plays came out of this concept, including Corey Clement’s 55-yard gain on a wheel route in the second quarter and tight end Zach Ertz’s drive-extending grab on a shallow cross to convert the fourth-and-1 in the fourth quarter.

Foles also attempted 21 play-action passes – the most ever in Super Bowl history – and was 12-of-21 for 118 yards and a touchdown on them, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

Both offences were dealing, but the difference was one got a little more help from its defence as Brandon Graham’s strip-sack of Brady in the final minutes provided the key stop.

Patriots’ uncharacteristic mistakes

New England are known for excelling at situational football, but they looked unlike themselves in several crucial moments.

The red zone, along with third and fourth downs, are where games are won and lost. For as poorly as the Patriots’ defence played, they did well to hold the Eagles to two touchdowns on four red zone trips. The real problem, however, was getting off the field on third and fourth downs, which Philadelphia converted 10-of-16 times and on both occasions, respectively.

A number of those third down pick-ups came with New England defenders missing tackles and failing to bring down the ball-carrier before the line to gain.

Malcolm Butler could have likely helped, but the cornerback didn’t play any defensive snaps as he was bizarrely kept sidelined for an undisclosed reason.

In his place, Eric Rowe got the call and struggled for much of the first half against Alshon Jeffery before Stephon Gilmore drew the assignment in the second half and had more success.

The Patriots didn’t fare much better in special teams – where they almost always have an edge – with Stephen Gostkowski missing a 26-yard field goal after a mishandled snap and then shanking an extra point.

Other miscellaneous errors included Brady’s scramble to lose time at the end of the first half and Bill Belichick’s decision to kick a field goal on fourth-and-1 from the 8-yard line, which resulted in Gostkowski’s miss.

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Super Bowl LII: Nick Foles' touchdown grab and other key plays that spurred Philadelphia Eagles' win

Jay Asser 5/02/2018
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Nick Foles hauls in a touchdown catch on the Eagles' trick play.

In the Philadelphia Eagles’ action-packed 41-33 victory over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LII, there were several standout plays that played a substantial role in determining a wildly entertaining game.

Here are four key plays that proved to be crucial to Philadelphia’s first Super Bowl title.

Trick and treat

Minutes after Tom Brady failed to reel in Danny Amendola’s pass on a Patriots gadget play, the Eagles decided to pull off their own trickery – and this time do it right. On a gutsy fourth-and-goal call near the end of the first half, Philadelphia ran a reverse throwback with tight end Trey Burton tossing a touchdown pass to Nick Foles. The Eagles quarterback did what Brady couldn’t as his safe hands gave his side a 10-point lead off a play called the ‘Philly Special’.

Foles drops a dime to Clement

Of all the beautiful throws Foles uncorked, his 22-yard connection with running back Corey Clement may have been the best. With the Eagles facing a third-and-6, Foles spotted Clement in a favourable match-up with New England linebacker Marquise Flowers and sent a perfect pass before safety Devin McCourty could get over to help. Clement appeared to bobble the ball just a tiny bit, but the scoring play held up on review and extended Philadelphia’s lead to 29-19.

Zach attack on do-or-die

This was a play most coaches wouldn’t even attempt, given the situation: fourth-and-1 from your own 45-yard line with 5:39 left in the contest and a red-hot Tom Brady waiting to get the ball back on the other side. And yet, Doug Pederson didn’t flinch and called for one of the Eagles’ bread-and-butter plays, a mesh concept, which resulted in Foles finding Zach Ertz on a shallow cross to keep alive a drive that the tight end would later finish off for a lead they wouldn’t relinquish.

Graham finally gets to Brady

Philadelphia only managed to sack Brady once, but they sure made it count. Just when it seemed like Brady and the Patriots might pull off another remarkable comeback, Brandon Graham squashed any chance of late heroics by strip-sacking the quarterback with just over two minutes remaining. The Eagles recovered the fumble and the turnover would lead to a field goal that gave Philadelphia a more comfortable eight-point lead, which New England couldn’t overcome in the final minute.

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