Stipe Miocic earns respect as he dominates Francis Ngannou to break UFC heavyweight record

Alex Rea 22/01/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Stipe Miocic defeated the scariest man in the UFC to reaffirm his status as the baddest man on the planet.

Francis Ngannou was billed as the next big thing – figuratively and metaphorically – to the point his hulking frame dominated the UFC 220 promotional spotlight and left the heavyweight champ in the dark.

But Miocic dimmed the Cameroonian’s incandescent hype with a dominant performance and in the process became the division’s longest reigning champion.

In truth, the fight wasn’t even close and it ultimately came down to one heavyweight first round.

Miocic survived the challenger’s early onslaught and escaped the session with only a swollen left eye to show for.

‘The Predator’ was on the hunt in the opening minutes with his violent combinations backing Miocic up against the cage wall.

But wearing the same unmoved, deadpan expression he carried into the Octagon, Miocic maintained his composure to impose his way by landing takedown after takedown.

He practically breezed through the four remaining rounds with the element of danger diminishing by the minute as an exhausted Ngannou ran out of steam.

In the end, Miocic’s versatility and experience sucked the super from Ngannou’s superhuman athleticism. The punishing defeat provided the promotion a painful reminder that star names are born rather than manufactured and while you have to admire Ngannou’s heart for enduring a five-round suffocation, respect has been a hard commodity to come by for Miocic.

Indeed, the currency of breaking title defence records has far more weight, merit and value than the gimmick of owning the hardest punch despite UFC president Dana White’s infatuation to add gravitas to Ngannou’s world-record strike.

While he justifiable hits like a Ford Escort – see his previous knockout of Alistair Overeem – the UFC forgot that the champ has the ability to halt the vehicle carrying any hype and after adding Ngannou to Overeem and Junior Dos Santos in his list of title defence successes, Miocic offered his own reminder.

“It was the Stipe show tonight,” Miocic said post fight.

“It wasn’t about him. It was about me, because I’m the champ. I broke the record. I’m the best.”

He added: “Yeah, I do (feel like the best ever). I had a killer’s row to get to it. I had a hard path to get to the title, and I had a hard path to defend the title. Nothing’s ever easy, but I’ve never had an easy road.”

The nature of Miocic’s title win over Fabricio Werdum at UFC 198 was a shock unto himself but his progression as a fighter is hallmarked the confidence he exudes now.

Nothing about his achievement is a surprise to him and having cleared out practically the entire top five there is no immediate obvious challenger.

The perennially injured Cain Velasquez’s return is TBD with a potential comeback not expected until the backend of 2018.

However, Miocic’s next opponent could be right under his nose, or rather right on his UFC 220 undercard.

Light-heavyweight champ Daniel Cormier’s situation runs parallel after he mauled Volkan Oezdemir to a second-round stoppage in Boston’s co-main event.

In frame: Daniel Cormier

In frame: Daniel Cormier

With Jon Jones heading for a suspension after a doping violation, Alexander Gustafsson is the sole challenger at 205lbs. The Swede, however, is out of action until at least the summer after shoulder surgery and it means Cormier could head north of his division for a fascinating superfight with Miocic.

White floated the idea when talking to FOX and Cormier, who fought his first 13 pro fights at heavyweight, offered his reply in the post-fight press conference.

“I haven’t really thought about it,” he said.

“It’s hard for me now, because Cain’s in the gym more. Cain’s in the gym now getting back, preparing to do what he does best.

“If he’s getting prepared to get that belt back, then I have nothing for that division. That’ll never change.”

Most popular

A loss for McGregor and other predictions for the UFC in 2018

Alex Rea 8/01/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Conor McGregor will pick UFC over boxing this year - and suffer a loss.

Conor McGregor constructed a reputation for being able to “predict dese tings” with his forecasted finishes developing the moniker ‘Mystic Mac’.

Unfortunately, we mere mortals struggle to predict our next meal nevermind the future and in MMA the job of formulating predictions is often a hollow business.

You only have to peak into the past to see why with McGregor himself at the epicentre of the most unpredictable event in combat sports history with last year’s boxing bout with Floyd Mayweather.

Few predicted that reality and so plotting the path of 2018 is a challenging prospect.

Still, there are sign posts which could assist in the direction of the year and with that in mind here is our best guess at the complexion of 2018 for the UFC.

GSP’S RETIREMENT

Despite all the proclamations of an intended stay at 185lbs, Georges St Pierre vacated the title and division quicker than an awkward conversation.

And the discussion about his future starts and ends with a 2018 retirement.

It poses one of the burning questions of the next 12 months but the Canadian simply has nothing left to prove in this sport.

The nature of his win over Johny Hendricks left questions about his validity as the best in the world but having joined BJ Penn, Randy Couture and Conor McGregor as the UFC’s only two-division champions after choking Michael Bisping, his legacy is cemented.

Aside from an unlikely clash with McGregor, there are no big money fights out there for the Canadian. He turns 37 in May and is on the sidelines after being diagnosed with colitis making the prospect of a return improbable.

Is this the year Georges St. Pierre retires?

HOLLOWAY WILL BE P4P KING

If 2017 was about laying the foundation for Max Holloway’s legacy, the next 12 months will be about building a permanent residence among the best in the world.

Demetrious Johnson is the current pound-for-pound king and granted there is no equal – not just right now but perhaps ever.

But the flyweight champ faces the trickiest test of his long reign with bantamweight title holder TJ Dillashaw his projected next opponent.

Dillashaw’s striking is another level while his wrestling is too good for DJ and his gas tank equal as well.

Defeat for ‘Mighty Mouse’ will knock him off top spot and in will step Holloway.

The Hawaiian is on a 12 fight win streak, beat the best featherweight of all time twice last year and can take down another all-time legend in Frankie Edgar in 2018.

At 26, he is closing in on the all-time consecutive victory (16) record and most UFC wins (20) having notched 14 and 15 over Jose Aldo.

Clean out the rest of 145lbs this year and he will be the UFC’s P4P king.

Max Holloway is set to establish himself as the UFC's pound-for-pound king.

McGREGOR RETURNS AND LOSES

The curious case of Conor McGregor. Will he a: box again; b: defend his title or c: both.

The best predictor is the hardest to predict and the Irishman’s next move is as unclear as it ever has been.

For a man in a permanent trajectory 2018 will be a rarity for the 155lbs champ because it will be a step down both in money and magnitude after his defeat to Mayweather.

What is clear, is that the money is in boxing for McGregor, the legacy in MMA and it’s likely the latter, for once, will appeal.

That should see the 29-year-old fight the winner of interim champ Tony Ferguson or Khabib Nurmagomedov and with the prediction of a win for the Dagestani follows defeat for McGregor. Nurmagomedov’s frightening physical manipulation of his opponents is unrivalled and should he get his hands on McGregor, it will be a second defeat of his UFC career.

McGregor tasted defeat in the boxing ring, and a loss in the Octagon this year could follow.

JEDRZEJCZYK BECOMES CONCURRENT TWO-WEIGHT CHAMP

A bold prediction considering Joanna Jedrzejczyk is no longer champ in one division, nevermind two.

However, the Pole is more McGregor than Rousey in terms of handling defeat with her gracious post-fight persona after a shock loss to Rose Namajunas indicating a mental fortitude prepared to take back the title.

Having left the nutrition team which botched her weight cut prior to Namajunas loss, Jedrzejczyk could return better than ever in 2018.

Reclaiming her strawweight belt naturally segways into a move up to the newly opened flyweight division and given the fledgling nature of 125lbs a win there is on the cards.

With an ability to flick between the two weight classes, we could well see Jedrzejczyk become not just the first two-division women’s champ, but also the UFC’s second concurrent two-weight belt holder.

Joanna Jedrzejczyk is poised to become a two-weight champion in 2018.

Most popular

UFC 219 hallmarked by MMA's two most dominant fighters in Cyborg and Nurmagomedov

Alex Rea 31/12/2017
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Cris Cyborg lands on Holly Holm at UFC 219

Two utterly dominant performances by two of MMA’s most dominant forces, Cris Cyborg and Khabib Nurmagomedov produced torturous victories at UFC 219 to add credence to their claims as the best in their respective divisions.

In Cyborg’s case, that assersition stretches beyond her featherweight realm because the Brazilian is the GOAT of women’s MMA.

Holly Holm dragged the Brazilian through five hellacious rounds to force her first decision in nine years.

That in itself merits applause, and such is the superiority of Cyborg, going the distance is viewed as a moral victory, even if it’s one which left Holm disfigured.

Indeed, the former Invicta and Strikeforce title holder has evolved from brutal berserker to a technical titan with her victory in the main event slot of UFC 219 one of cold composure.

You could say it was machine-like.

In a fight which displayed the very best skill women’s MMA has to offer, the defending champion landed a ferocious 118 of 223 of her significant strikers compared to Holm’s 44 of 227, according to FightMetric.

And Cyborg had more rounds in her such was the depth of her gas tank.

Her lowest output was in the first frame when she landed 16 strikes but in the fifth the 32-year-old landed 39 strikes, a nod to her tremendous cardio.

Holm was game, but she was never really in the bout, the former bantamweight champ displaying great heart to withstand Cyborg for five rounds.

Ultimately, she was too predictable and Cyborg’s combination of power, accuracy, variety and crucially timing was simply too much.

Some corners will argue size was the difference but in the clinch Holm imposed her will with the height and reach virtually identical.

True, Cyborg is thicker but she also possesses a broader MMA brain and after being taken to a decision for the first time since 2008, questions now turn to who can beat her. The list is cut shorter with every victory.

“Thank you for Holly Holm,” Cyborg said after her 19th career win. “She is an amazing fighter she had a very good fight.”

In her post-fight press conference, she added: “I’m saying (I want Megan Anderson), because she’s 145lbs. I would like my division to grow. If we’re growing fast, you need to put more girls at 145. And I think she’s in the line to fight for the belt.”

Anderson, the Invicta featherweight champ, was booked to fight Cyborg for the vacant 145lbs belt at UFC 214 in July but withdrew from the contest due to undisclosed personal issues.

However, that bout is clearly still on her radar as the Australian tweeted: “Great fight ladies! Congrats Cris on retaining your belt! @ufc I think there’s only 1 fight to make now against a legit featherweight. #UFC219”

Anderson represents a greater physical challenge but at this point Cyborg is virtually peerless.

In that sense, Nurmagomedov is in the same category.

Indeed, ‘The Eagle’ is the ultimate apex predator and his physical manipulation of Edson Barboza was straight torture.

The Brazilian was effectively run over by a car repeatedly for three rounds as Nurmagomedov marched forward barely giving his fellow top contender at 155lbs any inch of space.

And that was on the feet, on the ground, the Dagestian is legitimately frightening. What he can do to the most elite lightweights in the world is akin to a bull riding a cowboy.

Nurmagomedov simply mauled Barboza and having come into the bout in his best shape yet, hope grows 2018 will hold two-three fights having fought just three times since April 2014.

“When I’m injured, they talk too much,” Nurmagomedov said. “But when I’m healthy, I don’t see these guys.

“Tony (Ferguson) or Conor (McGregor), don’t matter,” he said of his next fight. “Maybe if the UFC approves, I can fight with these guys in the same night. I swear, no joke.

“Maybe I have to stay humble, but tonight, I have to smash these guys and get these guys back, because these guys talk too much when I’m injured.”

The only talk now is of who is out there capable of beating two of MMA’s best in Cyborg and Nurmagomedov.

Most popular