Edwin Jackson to join these US sports athletes with record for most teams played on in their respective sports

Jay Asser 24/06/2018
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Edwin Jackson has earned a call-up with the Oakland Athletics.

Edwin Jackson is set to make MLB history by joining his 13th major league team, which will tie Octavio Dotel’s record for most by a player.

The Oakland Athletics plan to call up the 34-year-old right-handed pitcher to start Monday’s game against the Detroit Tigers, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The move will make the Athletics the 13th big league club Jackson has played for over in his 16th year, joining the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Washington Nationals, Chicago Cubs, Atlanta Braves, Miami Marlins, San Diego Padres and Baltimore Orioles.

Retired relief pitcher Dotel also played for 13 teams over 15 years, which included the New York Mets, Houston Astros, Athletics, New York Yankees, Kansas City Royals, Braves, White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Toronto Blue Jays, St. Louis Cardinals and the Tigers.

That got us thinking of the other athletes in American sports who hold the quirky honour of playing for the most teams.

NBA

Four players in NBA history are tied with time spent on 12 teams – Chucky Brown, Jim Jackson, Tony Massenburg and Joe Smith.

Smith is the most recent one, having played from 1996 to 2011 with the Golden State Warriors, Philadelphia 76ers, Minnesota Timberwolves, Detroit Pistons, Milwaukee Bucks, Denver Nuggets, Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers, Oklahoma City Thunder, Atlanta Hawks, New Jersey Nets and Los Angeles Lakers.

Smith

His journeyman career is surprising considering he was the number one overall pick in the 1995 draft and was named to the All-Rookie First Team as a member of the Warriors.

Jackson was similarly a high draft pick, selected fourth overall in 1992 by the Dallas Mavericks before going on to play with the Nets, 76ers, Warriors, Portland Trail Blazers, Hawks, Cavaliers, Miami Heat, Sacramento Kings, Houston Rockets, Phoenix Suns and the Lakers.

Coincidentally, both Massenburg and Brown were drafted in the second round with the 43rd overall pick, with the former taken in 1990 by the San Antonio Spurs and the latter in 1989 by the Cavaliers.

Massenburg also played for the Charlotte Hornets, Boston Celtics, Warriors, Los Angeles Clippers, Toronto Raptors, 76ers, Nets, Vancouver Grizzlies, Rockets, Utah Jazz and Kings, while Brown was part of the Lakers, Nets, Mavericks, Rockets, Suns, Bucks, Hawks, Hornets, Spurs, Warriors and Kings.

NFL

No one in NFL history comes close to matching Shayne Graham’s mark of 15 teams played for over his 15-year career.

Dave Rayner, Billy Cundiff and J.T. O’Sullivan are next on the list with 11 each.

Graham

Graham was able to move around the league so often over a long career because he was a kicker. After going undrafted, Graham didn’t catch on in the NFL until being picked up by the New Orleans Saints in 2000. From there he joined the Seattle Seahawks, Buffalo Bills, Carolina Panthers, Cincinnati Bengals – where he spent seven seasons – Baltimore Ravens, New York Giants, New England Patriots, Washington, Dallas Cowboys, Miami Dolphins, Houston Texans, Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers and Atlanta Falcons.

His peak came in 2005 with the Bengals when he was named a First-team All-Pro and a Pro Bowler.

NHL

Like Graham, Mike Sillinger sits alone atop the NHL record books, having played with 12 teams over his 17-year career.

Sillinger

The centre was drafted 11th overall by the Detroit Red Wings in 1989 and went to also play for the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, Vancouver Grizzlies, Philadelphia Flyers, Tampa Bay Lightning, Florida Panthers, Ottawa Senators, Columbus Blue Jackets, Phoenix Coyotes, St. Louis Blues, Nashville Predators and New York Islanders.

He was traded times, which is also an NHL record.

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Alex Bregman helps Houston Astros secure sensational 5-4 win over Tampa Bay Rays

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The Houston Astros came back from 4-0 down to beat the Tampa Bay Rays 5-4 and secure their 12th straight MLB victory.

The Rays were 2-0 up early through a Wilson Ramos homer, and a Jake Wendle two-run RBI single doubled the lead in the third inning.

But the Astros cut the deficit to 4-2 in the fourth and pulled a third run back in the sixth through a Yuri Gurriel RBI single.

Alex Bregman then secured a dramatic victory in the ninth inning with a walk-off double.

The New York Yankees and Washington Nationals split their double-header with one victory apiece.

The Nationals won the first game – a completion of their suspended game on May 15 – by 5-3, but went down 4-2 in the second.

Elsewhere, the New York Mets scored six runs in the final inning as they beat the Colorado Rockies 12-2, the Texas Rangers beat the Kansas City Royals 6-3 and the Cleveland Indians beat the Chicago White Sox 6-2.

Aaron Altherr’s two-run walk-off double in the 10th inning earned the Philadelphia Phillies a 6-5 win against the St Louis Cardinals, while the Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Milwaukee Brewers 1-0.

The Miami Marlins scored three runs in the ninth as they overturned a 4-0 deficit to beat the San Francisco Giants 5-4 and the Arizona Diamondbacks beat the Los Angeles Angels 7-4.

The clash between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago Cubs was postponed to Tuesday due to the weather.

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Washington Capitals bring nation's capital the title city was yearning for

Jay Asser 8/06/2018
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Washington fans cheer during Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Finals.

Washington D.C. is the nation’s capital, but the shortcomings of the city’s teams over the years have kept it from being anything close to a sports capital.

While fellow east coast elites like Boston and New York vacuumed up championships, and other major markets like Los Angeles and Chicago won their fair share, the District of Columbia was unable to break away from a constant state of disappointment.

Until now. Washington is again a city of champions as the Capitals, fittingly the area’s most frustrating team, delivered D.C.’s first title since 1992 by lifting the Stanley Cup.

Between Washington’s four major sports teams – in the NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL – it had been 71 combined seasons since the last D.C. franchise even reached the championship game or series. The Capitals not only got there, they overcame the Vegas Golden Knights fairytale to break through.

‘Our year’ was this year. There was no collapse this time after going up 3-1 in a series. The other shoe never dropped. It may still feel surreal to Capitals fans, but yes, they actually did it.

The disappointment and apathy is gone. The only feeling Washington sports are inspiring today is pure, unadulterated happiness. And the city needed it.

There are only 13 cities in the U.S. that have teams represented in all four major sports leagues, and of those 13, only Washington and Minnesota hadn’t celebrated at least one title since the turn of the century before Thursday.

It’s not as if D.C.’s teams hadn’t come close, which is in a way even more painful because it’s the hope that kills you in the end. And none of Washington’s franchises have inspired more hope, only to subsequently crush it, than the Capitals.

Washington’s NFL side were actually the team to bring home that title in 1992, but since then they’ve made the playoffs just five times, failing to get out of the second round on each occasion.

In the NBA, the Wizards have similarly failed to clear the hurdle that is the second round, falling short of the conference finals in their last 16 postseason appearances.

The Nationals, meanwhile, somewhat mercifully have a shorter history in MLB after moving from Montreal in 2005, which means they’ve only been able to lose the Division Series the four times they’ve reached the playoffs.

The Capitals weren’t much different as they fell in the second round in their previous 12 trips, but the sheer volume of their playoff appearances – no team in any of the four major leagues had as many playoff visits before winning a title – left Washington fans feeling numb.

Throw on top of that how the Capitals have crashed out season after season, including five blown 3-1 series leads – more than any team across the four major leagues – and you begin to understand just how much disappointment the nation’s capital has had to cope with.

But all of that feels like ancient history now. The Capitals have exorcised their demons, and with it the city’s as a whole, in cathartic fashion, appropriately capped with a third-period comeback in Game 5 to squash any chance of another season ending in heartbreak.

Alex Ovechkin is no longer one of the greatest players who never reached the top of the mountain. It took him 13 seasons – the second-longest wait for an MVP in any sport before winning a title – but he got there. He’s no longer stranded with Barry Bonds in the exclusive, but undesirable club of players to win at least three MVPs but never a championship.

In a stroke of serendipity, the Capitals won the Stanley Cup in Las Vegas, allowing Ovechkin and his teammates to paint ‘Sin City’ red for the coming days or even weeks. Back in Washington, the party will rage on as the city savours an accomplishment that has eluded them for so long and so maddeningly.

It’s here now though. The District of Columbia is finally the District of Champions.

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