LeBron James agrees to join Los Angeles Lakers

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LeBron James has agreed a 154 million dollar deal (£116million) with the Los Angeles Lakers.

In a short statement, the 33-year-old’s sports management group said the three-time NBA champion has agreed a four-year contract with the Lakers, seeing the star leave the Cleveland Cavaliers for a second time and make his debut in the Western Conference.

Speculation had been mounting over the NBA star’s future after his player option with the Cavs expired over the weekend.

In the early hours of Monday morning UK time, Klutch Sport Group said on Twitter: LeBron James, four time NBA MVP, three time NBA finals MVP, fourteen time NBA All Star, and two time Olympic gold medalist has agreed to a four year, 154 million dollar contract with the Los Angeles Lakers.”

Entering his 16th NBA term, James had been with the Cavs for 11 seasons, with a four-year break at the Miami Heat in 2010-2014.

This year, the Cavs made the NBA Finals for the fourth season in a row but were beaten to the title by the Golden State Warriors.

In 82 games this season, James averaged 27.5 points, 8.6 rebounds and 9.1 assists.

In the post-season, the 14-time All Star averaged 34 points, 9.1 rebounds and nine assists, and was tipped to MVP by the Rockets’ James Harden.

The Lakers have failed to make the play-offs for the last five seasons.

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Jameis Winston forcing Tampa Bay Buccaneers to consider quarterback's future

Jay Asser 29/06/2018
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Jameis Winston will serve a three-game suspension at the start of next season.

The NFL has always been a results-driven league in which players receive opportunities based on what they can do on the field, regardless of what happens off of it.

Jameis Winston, however, could be reaching the point where he’s more trouble than he’s worth to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after the quarterback was handed a three-game suspension for his alleged groping of a female Uber driver in 2016.

The allegation is the latest in a string of controversies for Winston, dating back to his days in college at Florida State, where he was investigated for sexually assaulting a female student, involved in a shoplifting incident and witnessed shouting vulgar comments in public.

Though the alleged groping of the female Uber driver is Winston’s first offence since joining the Buccaneers in 2015, it only adds to the question marks surrounding his character.

Winston released a statement in which he apologised for his actions, but didn’t admit guilt or appear to take full responsibility.

“First and foremost, I would like to say I’m sorry to the Uber driver for the position I put you in. It is uncharacteristic of me and I genuinely apologise,” Winston said.

“In the past 2 1/2 years my life has been filled with experiences, opportunities and events that have helped me grow, mature and learn, including the fact that I have eliminated alcohol from my life.

“I know I have to hold myself to a higher standard on and off the field… I apologise to my teammates, the Buccaneers organisation and fans for letting them down and for not being able to be out there for the first three games of the season.”

Winston’s suspension hurts Tampa Bay’s outlook for next season, but even when he’s been on the field the results haven’t necessarily been there – the Buccaneers are 18-27 in the games he’s started and have yet to make the playoffs since his arrival.

The coming season could be Winston’s final chance to prove he’s Tampa Bay’s quarterback of the future as the Buccaneers are set to pay him $20.9 million in 2019 after picking up his fifth-year option, which is only guaranteed for injury.

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Edwin Jackson to join these US sports athletes with record for most teams played on in their respective sports

Jay Asser 24/06/2018
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Edwin Jackson has earned a call-up with the Oakland Athletics.

Edwin Jackson is set to make MLB history by joining his 13th major league team, which will tie Octavio Dotel’s record for most by a player.

The Oakland Athletics plan to call up the 34-year-old right-handed pitcher to start Monday’s game against the Detroit Tigers, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

The move will make the Athletics the 13th big league club Jackson has played for over in his 16th year, joining the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Washington Nationals, Chicago Cubs, Atlanta Braves, Miami Marlins, San Diego Padres and Baltimore Orioles.

Retired relief pitcher Dotel also played for 13 teams over 15 years, which included the New York Mets, Houston Astros, Athletics, New York Yankees, Kansas City Royals, Braves, White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, Dodgers, Colorado Rockies, Toronto Blue Jays, St. Louis Cardinals and the Tigers.

That got us thinking of the other athletes in American sports who hold the quirky honour of playing for the most teams.

NBA

Four players in NBA history are tied with time spent on 12 teams – Chucky Brown, Jim Jackson, Tony Massenburg and Joe Smith.

Smith is the most recent one, having played from 1996 to 2011 with the Golden State Warriors, Philadelphia 76ers, Minnesota Timberwolves, Detroit Pistons, Milwaukee Bucks, Denver Nuggets, Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers, Oklahoma City Thunder, Atlanta Hawks, New Jersey Nets and Los Angeles Lakers.

Smith

His journeyman career is surprising considering he was the number one overall pick in the 1995 draft and was named to the All-Rookie First Team as a member of the Warriors.

Jackson was similarly a high draft pick, selected fourth overall in 1992 by the Dallas Mavericks before going on to play with the Nets, 76ers, Warriors, Portland Trail Blazers, Hawks, Cavaliers, Miami Heat, Sacramento Kings, Houston Rockets, Phoenix Suns and the Lakers.

Coincidentally, both Massenburg and Brown were drafted in the second round with the 43rd overall pick, with the former taken in 1990 by the San Antonio Spurs and the latter in 1989 by the Cavaliers.

Massenburg also played for the Charlotte Hornets, Boston Celtics, Warriors, Los Angeles Clippers, Toronto Raptors, 76ers, Nets, Vancouver Grizzlies, Rockets, Utah Jazz and Kings, while Brown was part of the Lakers, Nets, Mavericks, Rockets, Suns, Bucks, Hawks, Hornets, Spurs, Warriors and Kings.

NFL

No one in NFL history comes close to matching Shayne Graham’s mark of 15 teams played for over his 15-year career.

Dave Rayner, Billy Cundiff and J.T. O’Sullivan are next on the list with 11 each.

Graham

Graham was able to move around the league so often over a long career because he was a kicker. After going undrafted, Graham didn’t catch on in the NFL until being picked up by the New Orleans Saints in 2000. From there he joined the Seattle Seahawks, Buffalo Bills, Carolina Panthers, Cincinnati Bengals – where he spent seven seasons – Baltimore Ravens, New York Giants, New England Patriots, Washington, Dallas Cowboys, Miami Dolphins, Houston Texans, Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers and Atlanta Falcons.

His peak came in 2005 with the Bengals when he was named a First-team All-Pro and a Pro Bowler.

NHL

Like Graham, Mike Sillinger sits alone atop the NHL record books, having played with 12 teams over his 17-year career.

Sillinger

The centre was drafted 11th overall by the Detroit Red Wings in 1989 and went to also play for the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, Vancouver Grizzlies, Philadelphia Flyers, Tampa Bay Lightning, Florida Panthers, Ottawa Senators, Columbus Blue Jackets, Phoenix Coyotes, St. Louis Blues, Nashville Predators and New York Islanders.

He was traded times, which is also an NHL record.

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