Winter Olympics: Italy's Christof Innerhofer steps it up on day two of downhill training

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Christoff Innerhofer topped the timesheets during alpine skiing practice.

Italian Christof Innerhofer topped Friday’s second men’s downhill training as Olympic racers battled tough conditions in alpine skiing’s blue riband event.

Innerhofer, who won downhill silver and combined bronze in Sochi four years ago, clocked 1min 18.97sec down a course shortened because of high winds atop the Jeongseon course.

It could prove to be an invaluable ski out, with weather conditions threatening Saturday’s third training and a potential rescheduling of Sunday’s actual downhill race, although nothing has been officially confirmed.

“It was very windy from behind on the track, I took the good wind with me, it blew me down!” said the 33-year-old Innerhofer.

Innerhofer, who has form on the mountain having finished second in the super-G in the test World Cup event two years ago, has struggled to bother the podium on a regular basis since his Sochi showing but insisted he still had something to offer.

“Sometimes I think about Sochi, especially when I go back home after every race and see my medals, it’s good memories,” he said.

“But I’m still here, because I want to live for the future, not the past. I would like to win.

“Sometimes I think maybe I can’t keep up with the best guys like I was years before, but I still try to believe and to give my best.”

Innerhofer predicted few surprises come race day here “because this slope is different from last two olympics. It will be skiing quick for known racers like Jansrud”.

Kjetil Jansrud, who won super-G gold and downhill bronze in Sochi as well as giant slalom in Vancouver in 2010, finished just behind Innerhofer but didn’t put much stock in the rankings.

Christof Innerhofer finished atop the rankings on Friday.

“It’s not a training run that tells you very much,” he said, listing the shortened course, the shifting tailwind and a shaved down last jump.

Jansrud expressed his hope that the downhill would be held over a full course rather than an abbreviated one, and in “optimal conditions”.

“The message we got was that they wanted to do a downhill from the top in fair conditions,” he said.

“I’m thankful to hear that because that’s the way it should be in the olympics and we do have reserve days.

“If it’s more windy than today, the gondola is not going to run so then we have a major problem for everybody and it’s not going to happen.”

Canada’s Manuel Osborne-Paradis, who topped Thursday’s first training, said he had “no worries whatsover about the weather, we live in an outdoor sport”.

“If we were worried about the weather we’d have been screwed a long time ago when you’re like 10, 11, 12 years old,” he said.

“In and out of clouds, the wind, snow picks up, whatever – you push out the gate and you do your best for two minutes and all the stars have to align anyway, that’s the only factor you’re in charge of is how you ski.”

Jansrud’s Norwegian teammate Aksel Lund Svindal, a three-time medallist in Vancouver, said the field was wide open.

“On any given day, anything can happen. Downhill in the olympics is any given day,” the 35-year-old said.

“On any World Cup it’s hard to predict the winner… but here there’s one downhill every fourth year and then it really gets a lot of focus and if there’s a prize you remember it longer.”

Austria’s defending Olympic champion Matthias Mayer said the course was “much easier” than the icy challenge that was the downhill in Sochi.

“It’s going to be so close on Sunday as a result,” said the 27-year-old, who upset a host of favoured rivals to claim a shock win before he’d even claimed a World Cup downhill victory.

“It’s always so, so special for all of us.”

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Doping cloud hanging over 2018 Winter Olympics even before Games begin

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The Winter Olympics will be conducted under the cloud of widespread doping.

The casual viewer of the Pyeongchang Olympics could be forgiven for wondering just how many athletes are doped after a raft of recent revelations in winter sports, despite “every effort” to crack down.

Endurance sports such as cross-country skiing and biathlon have come under the most scrutiny, but – much like the Summer Olympics – no discipline has been completely unscathed in the build-up to the Games, which open on Friday.

Russian athletes deemed “clean” will compete under a neutral flag after their country was banned for a well-orchestrated drugs cheating system four years ago that allegedly had links all the way to the Kremlin.

Speaking on the eve of the Games in South Korea, World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) president Craig Reedie attempted to assuage the concerns of athletes who fear their rivals could dope their way to gold.

There had been “very substantial” testing ahead of the Games, he said, adding: “I hope (that) will give the athletes comfort that they are in a fair and honest competition.

“Every effort has been made to provide a proper playing field for the athletes and I hope, more than anything else, that at the end of the Games that is what it will be.”

But recent Winter Games reveal grounds for scepticism.

Ahead of the Olympics, British newspaper the Sunday Times and German broadcaster ARD said they had been passed a database showing that more than 50 cross-country skiers set to compete in South Korea returned abnormal readings between 2001 and 2010.

Following Salt Lake City in 2002, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) increased its scrutiny after Spain’s Johann Muehlegg and four others were caught doping and stripped of their medals.

At the 2006 Turin Games, doping products were discovered in a chalet used by a coach involved with Austria’s cross-country skiing team. He fled the Games but was caught at a police roadblock.

Austria's delegation was caught in a doping controversy in 2006.

Austria’s delegation was caught in a doping controversy in 2006.

COCKTAIL OF STEROIDS

However, doping at the Winter Olympics reached its nadir with the Russian plot four years ago in Sochi.

The 2014 Games, hosted at enormous cost by Russia in the Black Sea resort, marked a new low with allegations of state-sponsored doping and the mass switching of test samples in favour of Russians.

The former director of the Moscow anti-doping lab Grigory Rodchenkov – now in exile, fearing for his life and cooperating with investigators – admitted he fine-tuned a muscle-building cocktail of steroids to ensure Russian competitors won medals on home soil.

And they inevitably did, as Russia soared to the top of the medals table – a triumph for President Vladimir Putin.

Russia has always denied accusations that it mounted a system of state-sponsored doping and has accused Rodchenkov of acting alone.

WADA commissioned Canadian professor Richard McLaren to compile a report that focused suspicion on hundreds of athletes, with skating, ice hockey, biathlon and even curling on a long list of winter and summer Olympic sports under scrutiny.

Endurance athletes in Pyeongchang will be heavily tested for the endurance booster EPO, and anti-doping officials fear that athletes have taken to using tiny, so-called “micro” doses to avoid detection. In response, testers will be taking ever more frequent samples.

“EPO micro-doses disappear quickly so doses are taken almost every day in the hope of escaping testers,” Xavier Bigard, of France’s national anti-doping agency, told AFP.

He also warned that the doses were likely to be taken out of competition to aid training and recuperation.

Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren's report shocked the sporting world

Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren’s report shocked the sporting world

SNOW WHITE

Anabolic steroid use is also under the microscope.

“One positive test in two is for anabolics and these offences happen in a wide field of disciplines,” Bigard added.

“EPO and anabolics can be used together to get both endurance and power. A cheat would be well advised to use both.”

In bobsleigh or speed skating, power is especially important.

Chinese speed skater Shi Xiaoxuan was banned from Pyeongchang after testing positive for clenbuterol, an endurance-boosting substance.

Chris Creveling of the US, a silver medallist in the 5,000m speed skating relay at the Sochi Olympics, has been barred for a positive test for clomifene, as has Canadian bobsleigher Jonathan Francis.

“It’s a substance that helps bring other anabolics to their full potential, a kind of booster,” explained Bigard.

According to WADA data, ice hockey has produced by far the most positive tests while alpine skiing emerges almost as white as snow.

But fans would be forgiven if they no longer believed in winter sports’ Snow White fairytale.

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Winter Olympics calling for Ghana skeleton ace Akwasi Frimpong

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Frimpong is the second Winter Olympian from Ghana.

Ghana’s Akwasi Frimpong knows a thing or two about sacrifice: he spent two years selling vacuum cleaners to finance his unlikely journey to the Olympics – as a skeleton racer.

After previously failing to qualify as a sprinter and in the bobsleigh, he is set to become only the second athlete from the West African country to compete at a Winter Games in Pyeongchang, six years after his Olympic hopes looked dead and buried.

Frimpong, who moved to the Netherlands when he was just eight, missed the 2012 London Olympics through injury and was a reserve on the Dutch bobsleigh team in Sochi four years ago.

The 31-year-old then switched to the crackpot sport of skeleton to try to qualify for the olympics for his native Ghana. But he admits he was terrified the first time he flung himself down an icy mountain head-first.

“It was scary, very scary,” Frimpong told AFP in an interview after training in Pyeongchang.

“You’re literally like ‘Oh my gosh, am I going to die?’ You can almost see your coffin waiting for you at the finish. When you make it to the bottom you feel a little bit more confident. But it was definitely painful in the beginning.”

Before following in the footsteps of Ghana’s “Snow Leopard” Kwame Nkrumah-Acheampong, who competed in slalom skiing at the 2010 Vancouver Games, Frimpong struggled to convince sponsors he was serious and few gave him the time of day.

“When I missed the bobsled in 2013, I was looking for a temporary job to pay for my cell phone bill and I saw an ad about selling vacuum cleaners door-to-door,” said Frimpong, breaking into a broad smile.

“In my first month I sold 18 of them in 15 days and in my second I won a gold-digger award for selling 32 vacuums in 18 days. I paid for my season selling vacuum cleaners!”

Frimpong, who turns 32 at the weekend before the start of the Olympic skeleton competition, lived with his grandmother in Ghana as a young child after his mother moved to the Netherlands in search of a better life for her family.

Akwasi Frimpong is looking to make history for Ghana.

Akwasi Frimpong is looking to make history for Ghana.

He joined his mother there but lived as an illegal immigrant and his skeleton helmet, which shows a rabbit escaping from a lion’s jaws, tells the story of Frimpong’s difficult road to the Olympics.

“My old sprint coach said you have a lion and a rabbit in a cage, and the rabbit’s trying to escape when the gate opens,” he explained.

“I was the rabbit and the lion was Dutch immigration hunting me down, trying to get me out of the country. All the negative things were basically the lion and I could never escape it.”

But from such troubled beginnings, Frimpong looks poised to become a smash hit in South Korea this month.

“I’ve been dreaming of the Olympics for 15 years,” he said.

“There are hard moments obviously, but I kept going because my grandma told me: ‘Akwasi, what you need for success is already in you!’

“It’s a matter of believing in yourself, having the will to never give up.”

The reaction to his success in football-mad Ghana has been “overwhelming”, said Frimpong.

But his immediate objective is to gain experience for the 2022 Beijing Olympics.

“My goal when I started was always 2022,” he said. “Africa has never won a winter medal before and Ghana has never won a gold medal in the olympics. It would be a great honour to do that.”

“But first I want to break down barriers, to show that black people can do this as well,” he added.

“I was always getting eaten by the lion, but I’ve finally become the rabbit my coach always wanted me to be.”

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