UAE

UAE veteran Mohammed Al Zarooni's basketball passion will never dim

Jay Asser 17/05/2017
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In action: Al Zarooni going for the hoop against Great Britain.

Even the most generous visions of what a wheelchair basketball player should look like fail to flatter Mohammed Al Zarooni.

The 36-year-old Emirati cuts an experienced figure, which is a nice way of saying he looks old for what he’s doing on the court. Hair missing on the top of his head and a body closer to healthy than lean, Al Zarooni wouldn’t be the first person picked out in a gym if the exercise was to identify the UAE’s top player and face of the team.

Yet here he is, playing in another Fazza Wheelchair Basketball International Championship this week at Al Ahli Club, leading his home nation as best he can against superpowers in the sport.

“Don’t worry about the balding,” Al Zarooni says with the laugh of a man comfortable in his skin and role with the UAE team, who he’s played with for 17 years.

Being around that long grants Al Zarooni a better vantage point on the landscape of wheelchair basketball in the Emirates than most. There are older players on the team, but Al Zarooni has been at the forefront and realises just how far they’ve come and how much further they still have to go.

“Team-wise, we have new plans and a new strategy,” he says. “We hired a new coach from England, he’s been with us for six months. We have different tactics and we’re improving in training. In games unfortunately, we are not. Not all of the players have the same mentality, so in the games, they’re not used to new players, moves and skills.”

Games like Tuesday’s 82-35 loss to Great Britain have become all too familiar. It would be understandable if Al Zarooni was too frustrated or jaded to keep working to improve the prospects of a country whose progress has been slow.

When speaking with Al Zarooni though, it’s immediately clear he has found the happy medium bet-ween striving for more and being appreciative of what he’s already accomplished. Most of all, his love for basketball remains undeterred, something he wants his team-mates, both young and old, to share.

“Play with heart. Enjoy the game. Enjoy the moment. Don’t worry about the result,” Al Zarooni says.

Pic by Chris Whiteoak/whiteoakpictures Wheelchair Basketball: The 9th Fazza International Wheelchair Basketball Tournament. UAE v Great Britain. Al Ahli, Dubai.

Talking ball: UAE team take instructions at Al Ahli Club.

Al Zarooni’s own journey in basketball began at the age of 19, when he joined Al Thiqah Club for Handicapped in Sharjah while attending Sharjah Men’s College.

Born without the full use of his legs, his dream was to be a Paralympian and Al Zarooni decided the easiest route to the national team would be through basketball. So he began training in college, attending 05:30 sessions while consuming dates and milk, resulting in a loss of 15kg. At the same time, he remained focused on his studies.

After completing college, he upped his training and finally broke through to the UAE team. Representing his nation may not have been as challenging as it is for others across the world, but he hopes able-bodied people understand how much handicapped athletes have to overcome.

“Wheelchair basketball is more difficult. For normal people, it’s normal. They can take care of themselves. Us, we have to take care of our disabilities, plus other things,” he says. “Don’t think this is easy.”

Al Zarooni’s challenges aren’t contained to his own struggles, however. He has two sons, Ahmed, eight, and Abdullah, six. Abdullah is also handicapped and Al Zarooni has travelled to the United States over the past seven years for his son’s treatment.

When he’s overseas, he still makes sure to find a gym and shoot around, like the time he wandered into an LA Fitness and played in a pick-up game with able-bodied players. Al Zarooni took two shots in the game. Both were 3-pointers and both found the bottom of the net. “They were freaking out and I felt so much joy,” he says.

That same joy keeps Al Zarooni going, even as he tacks on the years. Whether or not the UAE rise to the level he’d like, he still plans on crashing chairs and squeaking wheels on the hardwood.

“I hope people get more cheered up to go to the clubs, rather than sitting in their homes and doing nothing. Even if you’re handicapped, you can still represent your country,” Al Zarooni says. “We still need people who are hungry to play. I’ll be there, no one’s taking my place. I’ll see you in 10 years. No worries, man. I’m not going anywhere.”

Pictures by Chris Whiteoak/whiteoakpictures.

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UAE

XDubai helping UAE skateboarding scene to thrive

Hiba Khan 17/05/2017
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Despite the recent closure of skate parks around the city, XDubai has stood up firmly against the tide and is the go-to spot for both budding and seasoned skateboarders to further hone their skills on four wheels.

In this video, Mohammed Jawad Khoramifar, General Manager of XDubai, discusses the popularity of the sport in the region and its positive impact on fitness.

With the International Olympic Committee confirming that skateboarding will be part of the 2020 Olympic summer Games in Tokyo, the sport is continuing to grow.

Get in touch about your XDubai experiences via Twitter and Facebook.






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UAE

Shuttle success for UAE youngsters at finals

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In action: Young UAE badminton stars.

Hot on the heels of badminton’s first appearance in the UAE School Olympics last month, the region’s best young players put their skills on display again last week, with the 2017 UAE Shuttle Time Schools Championships Finals taking place on 10 May at the Salah Addin Sports Hall.

The young players had won their way through to the Schools Championships Finals after finishing in the top two in each age group in the Girls’ and Boys’ Championships held on 29 April and 6 May, which saw 52 teams from 18 schools compete in the Under 13, Under 15 and Under 17 age groups. A further 70 players took part in the Emirati challenge which took place concurrently.

The Indian High School continued their winning form of previous championships, claiming victory in four of the six categories.

In the girls’ division, the Indian High School triumphed in the Under 15 and Under 17 categories, defeating GEMS Our Own English High School 3-0 in both divisions. In the Under 13 category Gems Our Own English High school were victorious, defeating Dubai GEMS Private School 2-1.

In the boys division, the Indian High School again triumphed in the Under 15 and Under 17 categories, defeating GEMS Modern Academy 3-0 in the Under 15s and GEMS Our Own Indian High School 2-1 in the Under 17s.

GEMS Our Own High School Al Warqa’a denied the Indian High School a clean sweep, winning the Under 13 category 2-1.

In the Emirati Challenge girls’ competition, the Al Ebdaa Model School took out first and second places in two categories. Ayah Mohammed defeated Hamda Ahmed to win the Under 11 division and Shama Abdulla defeated Aya Mohammed in the Under 13 division. In the Under 15 division Dubai International School’s Sarah Al Jalaf claimed first place, defeating Al Ebdaa Model School’s Metha Abdullah in the final.

In the boy’s divisions it was a battle between the Dubai National School and the Dubai International School. Dubai National School teammates faced each other in the Under 15 division, with Saeed Omar defeating Othman Omar. In the Under 13 division Dubai International School took the honors with Nasser Merza defeating Dubai National School’s Ali Abdullah. In the Under 11 division the tables were turned, with Dubai National School’s Mansour Mohammed defeating Dubai International School’s Hadi Mohammed for the title.

Dubai Badminton Development Manager Jaffer Ebrahim said: “It’s fantastic to see the standard of play improving each year, and the children showing a great commitment to the sport.  Thanks must go to all the participants, coaches, teachers and Shuttle Time volunteers who were all instrumental in making this event a success.”

The competition was organized in conjunction with the Dubai Sports Council, and is part of the ongoing Shuttle Time Dubai grassroots development program which is aimed at increasing participation in badminton.

Shuttle Time Dubai is part of Dubai’s four-year, multi-platform partnership with the Badminton World Federation (BWF), facilitated by Falcon and Associates, the pinnacle of which is the staging of the annual Dubai World Superseries Finals, the first of which was held last December, which will be held in the city each year until 2017.

The next event in the Shuttle Time calendar is the annual Shuttle Time Club Championships which will be held at Dubai Sports World in July and August.

For the full list of results please go to:

School Team event result: https://www.tournamentsoftware.com/sport/tournament.aspx?id=3FA28D17-50A7-4D84-AE77-F52FF7060296

Emirati Challenge result: https://www.tournamentsoftware.com/sport/tournament.aspx?id=BE87A4F1-7D7D-4B6E-9969-A46E14CD7AD3

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