Six Nations: Eddie Jones blasts World Rugby as Wales "no-try" fiasco rolls on

Duncan Bech 14/02/2018
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Eddie Jones has criticised World Rugby for their “retrospective refereeing” of England’s Six Nations victory over Wales at Twickenham.

The sport’s global governing body announced on Tuesday that television match official Glenn Newman made an error by ruling out a try for Gareth Anscombe when Warren Gatland‘s men trailed 12-0 in the second quarter.

Gatland later described the decision as a “terrible mistake” and his view has been supported by World Rugby, who said in a statement that “Wales should have been awarded a try as the Wales player grounded the ball”.

Jones is uncomfortable when calls made by officials are subsequently corrected, as happened in the quarter-finals of the 2015 Rugby World Cup when it was admitted referee Craig Joubert made a mistake that effectively cost Scotland a place in the semi-finals.

“They (World Rugby) have a record of doing it. They’ve done it before,” the England head coach said.

“I’m on a good behaviour bond so I’ve got to be careful what I say, but I just think that once the game’s done and dusted that’s the game.

“You can’t have retrospective refereeing of decisions being done. The game’s done and dusted, so we’ve got to trust the referees and respect their integrity.

“When I say respect the referee, that’s the TV process as well. You leave it at that, and then you get on with it. One side’s won, one side’s lost.

“In Japan they have a great saying: ‘At full-time there’s no side’. That’s one of the traditions of Rugby, you get on with it, you respect the decision.

“If you haven’t got the rub of the green then you know you probably get it in the next couple of games. The TMOs do an excellent job. They make a decision.”

England’s Six Nations title defence resumes against Scotland at Murrayfield on Saturday week amid mixed fortunes on the injury front.

Sam Simmonds will miss at least the next two matches with a shoulder injury but off-setting his loss is the availability of Nathan Hughes, who Jones confirmed will start at number eight after recovering from a knee problem.

Anthony Watson and Owen Farrell are expected to recover from the unspecified knocks they sustained against Wales, but Elliot Daly has now suffered damage to his calf having completed his rehabilitation from an ankle complaint.

Referee Wayne Barnes oversees a scrummaging session between the England and Georgia packs

Referee Wayne Barnes oversees a scrummaging session between the England and Georgia packs

England performed a live scrummaging session against Georgia in west London on Tuesday as part of a two-day visit by the Eastern Europeans designed to put the Six Nations champions’ pack through their paces.

“Georgia were just the sort of scrum we needed to scrum against – strong, scrummaged in a different way,” Jones said.

“The boys learnt a number of different things. They had the superiority early on and we came back well. It was an excellent session for us.

“Georgia use their head and shoulders in different ways. There are different ways of exerting pressure in scrums – some of it’s old-fashioned, some of it’s new.

“They do different things. They scrum for a living and our guys have learnt a number of different things.”

Most popular

Related Tags

Related Sections

Six Nations: Breaking down the good and bad points for all six sides from round two

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

England and Ireland inched closer to a Six Nations title decider by extending their 100 per cent records at the weekend.

Here, we break down the good and bad points from the weekend’s action.

IRELAND

One good: Ireland’s attack was more innovative than against France two weeks ago and it’s clear the dry conditions allowed the team to play on the front foot. Quick ball and good options in terms of stretching the Italians’ line made Ireland look a threat every time.

One bad: Ireland lost two key players to injuries and leaked 19 second half points from a position of dominance. Their inconsistency late in the game means their championship hopes won’t be clearer until later in the tournament.

ITALY

One good: Scored 19 points in the second half against Ireland – the most they’ve ever scored in Dublin. In try scorer Matteo Minnozzi, they possess one of the most exciting young players in the competition.

One bad: Conor O’Shea’s men were never competitive for long spells against Ireland and they followed up last week’s 56-19 defeat against England by conceding eight tries to Schmidt’s men.

ENGLAND

One good: England’s ability to implement a quality game plan quicker was the decisive difference in this contest, capped off by two superb Jonny May tries in the early going.

One bad: Although they are unbeaten after two games, the Red Rose have yet to light up the championship like some expected. Injuries to key men may be a reason, but a vast improvement is needed if they are to lift a third Six Nations title.

WALES

One good: Warren Gatland’s side looked sharp when using quick ball from the breakdown – but were simply not as accurate as they were against the Scots in round one. The two week break presents a chance to build on mistakes before they face Ireland in a crunch tie in Dublin.

One bad: A game that got away from Wales. Being slow out of the blocks for the first 20 minutes – in which they shipped 12 points – essentially cost them the match. A clear disallowed try will add to their frustration when the squad sits down to review the match this week.

FRANCE

One good: It’s a shame that teams don’t get points for flair and tries – only results. France were impressive at the breakdown and showed style with two well-constructed tries.

One bad: Despite leading at the break, Les Bleus couldn’t maintain the intensity, and tired out during the second half. Their defeat poses another question as to how the Top 14 doesn’t prepare French teams to play consistent rugby for a full 80 minutes – only 40 minutes at a decent level.

SCOTLAND

One good: The Scots showed character to close out the victory after being behind for so long in the contest. Greig Laidlaw will deservedly take the headlines by kicking 22 points on his return to Test rugby after fracturing his leg in October.

One bad: Gregor Townsend’s men showed a way to win in the second half, but haven’t produced a consistent performance for 80 minutes since beating Australia in November. Defensive mistakes need to be tightened up if they are to win another game in this championship.

Most popular

Related Sections

Six Nations: Injury blow for Ireland as Robbie Henshaw ruled out

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Robbie Henshaw will miss the rest of the NatWest 6 Nations with the shoulder injury he suffered in Ireland’s 56-19 win over Italy on Saturday.

The British and Irish Lions centre’s loss is a significant blow to Ireland, who are bidding for a third title in five years.

The 24-year-old underwent a “procedure” on his right shoulder on Monday, the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) confirmed.

Ireland remain hopeful, however, that prop Tadhg Furlong can shake off a hamstring issue and number eight Jack Conan a shoulder complaint in time for the Dublin clash with Wales on February 24.

“Robbie Henshaw, who suffered a shoulder injury, has undergone a procedure this morning on the injured shoulder and has been ruled out of the remainder of the Championship,” read the IRFU statement.

“Tadhg Furlong, underwent a scan that revealed a minor hamstring injury but is expected to be fit for the Wales game.

“Jack Conan took a bang on his shoulder but is expected to be available for selection for Round 3.

“A reduced Ireland squad will assemble for a mini-camp in Athlone on Tuesday as a number of players return to the provinces.

“The 48-hour camp culminates with a sold out open training session at Buccaneers RFC.”

Henshaw suffered his suspected dislocated shoulder in the act of scoring his second try as Ireland overwhelmed Italy at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday.

The midfielder received oxygen on the field and departed with his right arm in a sling.

Now head coach Joe Schmidt will hope that Leinster centre Garry Ringrose will be back from ankle trouble in time to slot into midfield to replace Henshaw for the visit of Warren Gatland’s Wales.

Munster’s Chris Farrell would prove another option to partner Bundee Aki in the centres, with the Connacht battering ram admitting after the Italy clash that being without Henshaw for the rest of the campaign would prove a “big loss”.

Ireland remain on track for a final-weekend title showdown with England at Twickenham on March 17, with both sides having won their opening two fixtures in the 2018 tournament.

Most popular

Related Tags