Simona Halep v Garbine Muguruza: Stats, quotes and talking points ahead of Roland Garros semi-final

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PARIS — World No. 1 Simona Halep is into the semi-finals at Roland Garros for the third time in her last five appearances and is set to take on third-ranked Garbine Muguruza, who won the title here in 2016.

Halep booked her spot in the semis with a hard-fought 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-2 victory over Angelique Kerber, while Muguruza stormed in the the last-four without dropping a set, taking out Maria Sharapova 6-2, 6-1 in 70 minutes on Wednesday.

It sets up a marquee semi-final between two-time Grand Slam champion Muguruza and three-time major runner-up Halep.

Muguruza had a 0-3 record heading into her quarter-final with Sharapova but they hadn’t played since 2014, before the Spaniard experienced success at the Slams.

Halep and Kerber played arguably the best match of the season thus far at the Australian Open earlier this year and their quarter-final on Wednesday — in heavy damp conditions — also did not disappoint.

WHAT THE PLAYERS SAID

Halep on why she celebrated her win against Kerber by pointing her finger to her head:

“It was really about the mental. And also physical, for sure, but mental I was strong. And after losing that set, when I came back it was a little bit tough, but I stayed there. I stayed focused. I never gave up. So I think that’s why I won today. My head won it.”

Halep on how she balances staying relaxed during the Slams while also being intense on the court:

“The experience. I think it’s really important, and so many years I played at this level. Now it feels normal a little bit. Feels like I’m used to it. Of course it’s special every time to play a semis in Grand Slam. Here also in Paris, I like this place, so I feel good. I feel cool. And I’m expecting tomorrow a tough one, but I’m expecting also to give everything I have again to take my chance.”

Halep on the challenge of facing Muguruza:

“She’s playing fast with everyone. So doesn’t matter who is playing against. She does her game. So I have just to stay strong, to try to make her uncomfortable on court, and to try to play my game. It’s not many things, like, to discuss about this match. It’s a style that has everything. She’s a great player. She was in this position. She won this tournament. So tomorrow is going to be a big challenge for me.”

Muguruza on gaining experience at the Slams:

“Well, maybe before I was holding more my breath. Now I just find moments to enjoy, moments to be serious, moments to train. You know, I kind of learned with experience, you know, as always, how to manage these long tournaments better. I think, yeah, I’m doing it more and more.”

Muguruza on whether she feels like a favourite against Halep in this semi-final:

“I don’t feel I’m favourite for this match, because she’s played better than I have this year. She loves clay. She loves Roland Garros. She’s shown it. It’s a great match. It’s a great semi-finals. I’m motivated, and that’s it. That’s all.”

TALKING POINTS

TOP SPOT ON THE LINE

The winner of this Halep-Muguruza clash will not only reach the Roland Garros final but will walk away with the world No. 1 spot when the tournament wraps up. Muguruza is not too preoccupied about the prospect of unseating Halep from the summit.

“I heard about it just now that the one who wins will be No. 1. But I don’t give it too much attention,” said Muguruza, who held the top spot for four weeks last season. “In the past few years, I used to take this into account, and I shouldn’t have taken it so much to heart. So now I don’t have it in mind constantly. If I make it all, it’s very well. Otherwise, there will be more opportunities.”

HISTORY ON MUGURUZA’S SIDE

The Spaniard is 3-1 head-to-head against Halep, with their last meeting being a 6-1, 6-0 victory for Muguruza in the Cincinnati final in 2017. Halep won their only previous encounter on clay though, in Stuttgart in 2015.

Muguruza has been ruthless this tournament, dropping just 20 games en route to the semis. She lost her serve five times but it’s worth noting that Halep has created a whopping number of 60 break points on her opponents’ serve this fortnight.

PRESSURE’S ON HALEP

Halep insisted in her press conference that there is no pressure on her shoulders entering this semi-final but the fact remains that the Romanian is chasing a maiden Grand Slam title and will be itching to erase the painful memories from her defeat in last year’s final. For Muguruza, she’s been sailing through and playing freely, in a manner that makes it seem like a third major trophy for her would be a mere bonus.

STEPPING UP AT THE SLAMS

Muguruza’s ability to flip a switch and elevate her level at the majors continues to baffle. Since the start of her title run at Roland Garros in 2016, Muguruza has posted a 32-6 (84.2%) record in Grand Slam matches.
By contrast her win-loss numbers away from the majors are 55-35 (61.1%).

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Sloane Stephens v Madison Keys: Stats and talking points ahead of Roland Garros semi-final

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American duo Sloane Stephens and Madison Keys will square off in the Roland Garros semi-finals on Thursday, in a rematch of last September’s US Open final.

It’s the first time either player has made the last-four in Paris and the two friends are looking forward to their third career showdown against one another.

This is the first all-American French Open semi-final since 2002, when Serena Williams defeated Jennifer Capriati en route to the title.

Keys made it to the semis with a straight-sets win over Kazakhstan’s Yulia Putintseva while reigning US Open champion Stephens eased past Russia’s Daria Kasatkina.

This time last year, Stephens was still sidelined with a foot injury that her walking around in crutches and Keys was coming off a second wrist surgery. Since then, they made remarkable returns as they both feature in a second semi-final in the last three Slams.

WHAT THE PLAYERS SAID

Stephens on how she handles facing a good friend like Keys:

“It’s the same thing as always. When we get on the court, it’s time to compete. But before that, we are not going to be weird and awkward and make it, like, weird for each other. Now I just have to go find her, because I need to tell her some juicy stuff. I just went and searched for her in the training room. I think everything will be normal. And then when we get on the court, it’s time to compete. It’s go time. Until then, we’re the same girls as always.”

Stephens on whether she feels she tough to beat at the moment:

“Sure, yeah, I guess. I’m playing well, in a good space. I like clay. I mean, the court suits my game pretty well. Like I said, you have to just take your opportunities when you get them, and it’s just match by match, basically.”

Keys on how she’s finally finding her footing on clay:

“I think it was still kind of a confusion in the head up until about a week ago (smiling). Obviously, I grew up in the States where we don’t really have red clay. Even playing on clay, it was green clay, which is much faster and much different. So my first real experience on red clay, it was when I was 16 or 17. It’s been a little bit longer for me to get used to it, but I feel like every year I get more comfortable.”

Keys on how being “nice” never held her back:

“I have actually been told quite often that I’ll never win or do well because I’m too nice of a person and I just don’t have it. I think that’s a load of crap, but, you know, it’s just me (smiling). I don’t think you have to be mean in order to win matches. I think there’s a difference between being intense and wanting it and fighting and just not being nice, so that’s something that I have always stayed true to. I’m not ever going to try to be a person that isn’t nice, so that feels more authentic to me and, you know, I think I’m still doing okay. Well, trying to be as nice as possible.”

Keys on her upcoming semi-final against Stephens:

“I’m going to have to be the one to try to open up the court and go for my shots. I obviously lost to Sloane at the US Open, but, you know, I feel like on clay it’s a little bit of a different match-up.”

TALKING POINTS

CAN MADISON FIND THE KEY AGAINST SLOANE?

Keys is 0-4 in sets against Stephens in previous meetings, with the latter claiming wins over her friend on the hard courts of Miami in 2015 and US Open in 2017.

The American pair have contrasting styles, with Stephens’ game based on her athleticism and ability to get many balls back, while also turning defence into offence fairly quickly. Keys is all-out attack. She is less comfortable on the clay compared to Stephens and can get rattled when opponents make her run too much.

Keys will have to be patient in this semi-final, and only pull the trigger when she’s ready to finish off the point.

AMERICANS CAN CLAY

Many Americans struggle on the red dirt because of the lack of red clay courts in the United States but several players have managed to master the surface nonetheless. Serena Williams is a three-time French Open champion, Jennifer Capriati won in 2001, and the legendary Chris Evert retired with a 94.5% winning record on clay, triumphing seven times at Roland Garros.

It looks like the younger generation of Americans are also getting comfortable sliding and grinding on the dirt. Stephens has made the second week in Paris in five of her seven appearances and Keys is slowly coming to terms with the surface.

KEYS’ MAJOR FORM

Keys has reached the quarter-finals in her last three consecutive Grand Slams as the 23-year-old continues to make strides ahead at the highest level. She has now made the semis at three of the four majors with Wimbledon being the only Slam where she hasn’t featured in the final-four yet.

Keys has reached the second week in nine of her last 11 Slams.

She is one of two semi-finalists — alongside Garbine Muguruza — who are yet to drop a set this fortnight in Paris.

SPRING OF SLOANE

Just like she wowed the tennis world with her summer last year, Stephens is enjoying a strong spring that started with her winning the title in Miami. She made the last-16 in Madrid and Rome and now has a chance to make the French Open final.

NEW MILESTONES

A win on Thursday would move Stephens to No. 4 in the rankings. The last American to hold a top-five ranking other than Venus or Serena Williams was Lindsay Davenport in April 2006.

Following this tournament, Stephens will become the 44th woman in WTA history to cross the $10 million career prize money threshold.

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Garbine Muguruza has edge over Maria Sharapova, Navratilova and Davenport say

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Sharapova defeated Muguruza en route to the 2014 Roland Garros title.

Garbine Muguruza and Maria Sharapova both enter their Roland Garros quarter-final on Wednesday with lots of momentum from strong opening weeks in Paris but legends Martina Navratilova and Lindsay Davenport give the edge to the Spaniard in this blockbuster showdown.

The Barcelona-based Muguruza, a title winner at the French Open in 2016, is seeded No. 3 this fortnight, and has shown sizzling form so far, making the quarters without dropping a set (also benefitted from an early retirement from an injured Lesia Tsurenko in the fourth round).

Sharapova got a walkover from Serena Williams in the last-16 but her previous round was a 6-2, 6-1 dismantling of world No. 6 Karolina Pliskova.

The Russian, who returned from a 15-month doping suspension in April last year, is looking to reach her first Grand Slam semi-final since Wimbledon 2015.

Sharapova leads Muguruza 3-0 head-to-head but they haven’t met since 2014. The world No. 3 has won two majors since then.

Asked who she favours in this match-up, Navratilova, an 18-time Grand Slam champion, said: “You have to give an edge to Garbine, having won here a couple of years ago, a lot younger, fresher legs, more matches, all that stuff.

“But Maria has won here twice, so she clearly knows how to play on it and has her best record of all the Slams here, even though she said she can’t play on clay, go figure.”

Ex-world No. 1 and three-time major winner Davenport, who is also the coach of semi-finalist Madison Keys, agrees with Navratilova.

“I’ve probably been the most impressed, of all the players, with Muguruza so far,” said Davenport.

“She’s kind of sailed through, she’s looked really good, she’s won here before, she’s obviously comfortable playing here and I think she’s a better athlete than Sharapova.

“So then I think you have to give the edge to Muguruza in a lot of ways. It’s hard to give a player an edge over Sharapova when Sharapova has dominated the head-to-head and is so strong mentally.

“But I think Garbine has looked in a good place here, and a lot of times you can tell just looking at her and her eyes during a match where she is, and I think she looks good.”

The other quarter-final of the day will see world No. 1 Simona Halep taken on two-time Grand Slam champion Angelique Kerber.

Halep is a two-time runner-up in Paris and lost her third Grand Slam final at the Australian Open in January, to Caroline Wozniacki. The Romanian is looking to finally clinch a maiden major title and has also been in fine form this fortnight.

“I would think that she is the person putting the most pressure on herself, and maybe Romania, because they obviously want to see a champion,” Davenport said of Halep, who needs to reach at least the semis to have a chance of holding onto her No. 1 ranking.

“You have to watch Simona most closely in the bigger matches on the biggest occasions. And a lot of times you can look to her body language, either how she’s treating Darren (Cahill her coach), or treating her box, or how she’s treating herself, goes a long way to seeing how much stress she feels she’s under and I think that’s going to be her biggest thing the next few matches as it gets more and more pressure, bigger stakes, most likely better opponents.

“I like watching her between points, and kind of the communication and the vibes she’s kind of giving off tells a lot.”

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