Simona Halep withdraws from Nature Valley International

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French Open champion Simona Halep has withdrawn from next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne because of an Achilles problem.

The world number one won an emotional first grand slam title at Roland Garros earlier this month but will go into Wimbledon without an official match on grass.

Halep wrote on Twitter: “I’m very sorry to announce that I’m withdrawing from next week’s Nature Valley International.

“I was experiencing Achilles tendon pain and inflammation during the French Open and it has yet to fully recover. I’ve been advised by my doctors that it needs more rest while continuing treatment. I loved competing at Eastbourne last year and hope to see you at this wonderful event next year.”

Halep’s withdrawal leaves four top-10 players in the field, including last year’s champion Karolina Pliskova and runner-up Caroline Wozniacki.

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Andy Murray feels 'decent' after making return but won't rule out missing Wimbledon

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Andy Murray made his return after missing 11 months.

Andy Murray said he was feeling “decent” after finally making his comeback following 11 months on the sidelines, but has not ruled out missing Wimbledon.

The three-time grand slam champion played his first competitive match since SW19 last year – 342 days ago – and put in a spirited display in going down to a three-set defeat to Nick Kyrgios at the Fever-Tree Championships at Queen’s Club.

Murray, who went under the knife on his hip problem in January, battled hard throughout before eventually going down to a 6-2, 6-7 (4/7), 5-7 loss.

He will see how it fully recovers before deciding when to play next, but said it is not a given he will be at Wimbledon next month.

“I won’t rule anything out just now,” he said. “I won’t rule out playing Eastbourne and not playing Wimbledon.

“I wouldn’t rule out not playing a tournament next week and trying to get matches like in an exhibition tournament, as well, to get ready for Wimbledon.

“I’m not sure yet. I’m really happy that I got on the match court today. You know, it was a close decision.

“I have not been practising loads at all. I have been hitting for a couple of weeks and the beginning was only like 30 minutes or so.

“I really haven’t played a whole lot of tennis, so I’m happy I got out there and competed and performed respectably.

“I’ll kind of need to wait and see what happens the next few days and chat with my team about that, because I don’t know exactly what’s best for me just now.”

Murray did not appear to be troubled by any hip pain during the gruelling two-hour, 39-minute match, though knows the true test will be when he wakes up in the morning.

“I’m a bit stiff just now,” he said. “I’ve got kind of normal stuff that you would get after maybe playing on a grass court for the first time in a while.

“At the most, longest I have practised in the last year has been an hour and a half. So I was on the court for significantly longer than that in a more intense environment.

“So I’m feeling decent, considering that.

“But hopefully I’m not too sore in the hip after a match like today, and I also physically will have gained a lot from it as well.”

Kyrgios, ironically, was battling his own hip problem but was able to come through after looking like he was going to be blown away.

Murray won the first set 6-2 after the Australian went rogue, losing four games in a row, which included a service game with four double faults.

The pair are good friends off court and Kyrgios admitted he felt awkward.

“It was strange because on big points, when I won them, I almost felt bad if I showed any emotion,” he said.

“Like I didn’t really want to get into his grill at all.

“But other guys, if I’m up 30, like 30-all or have a match point, I’m probably going to be a bit psyched up.

“It was kind of good to see him back out there, but it was a very awkward match for me because I was thinking the guy hadn’t played a match in a year, and I was getting smoked in the first set.

“I was like, ‘This is not going to be a good look if I lose this match’.”

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Andy Murray makes positive return from 11-month absence: Things learned from his loss to Nick Kyrgios at Queens

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He's back: Andy Murray.

Andy Murray can take many positives from his 2-6, 7-6 (4), 7-5 defeat to Nick Kyrgios at Queens on Tuesday, which was the Brit’s first competitive match in 11 months.

A two-hour 39-minute clash against someone like Kyrgios is probably not the ideal way a player would want to make his comeback from hip surgery but Murray battled hard throughout and learnt a lot about where he is at, competition-wise, ahead of Wimbledon.

From the outside though, it’s difficult to judge Murray’s state mainly because Kyrgios was unpredictable during the match and at times playing schizophrenic tennis.

Here are things learned from Murray’s Queens opener…

MURRAY CAN MOVE

All eyes were on the Scot’s hip and he surprised us with how well he was moving in his first match back. At one point in game six, Murray ran down a drop shot off of a Kyrgios half volley and it was that sprint that eased many people’s worries.

NOT TOO RUSTY

Murray fired 39 winners against just 26 unforced errors against Kyrgios. While he landed only 56 per cent of his first serves in, he won 76 per cent of the points on those first serves and 40 per cent of the points on his second serve. He also blasted 16 winners compared to Kyrgios’ 18. He wasn’t clinical on the break points though as he converted 4/11, which is still better than Kyrgios’ 3/11. The ex-world No. 1 was 13/17 at the net.

FIRED UP

Murray yelling at his box after missing and roaring in celebration on his winners was probably a sight for his fans’ sore eyes. The 31-year-old said he had missed tennis and is purely back on court for the love of the game. That was evident throughout. Uncharacteristically donning a colorful Under Armour shirt – which he accidentally wore the wrong way during the match – Murray deservedly received a standing ovation when he stepped on the court. It may have been a losing return but he cannot be too disappointed with how played.

WHAT’S WRONG WITH KYRGIOS?

The paradox that is Nick Kyrgios continues to baffle. The Aussie has undeniable flair and he pulled out all the stops in the first few games, hitting tweeners, unleashing 137mph second serves, doing 360s before routine overheads and embodying the entertainer he truly is.

At the coin toss, he joked with Murray, who is a good friend of his, asking: “Do you remember how to do this, Andy?”

But at the tail-end of the first set, Kyrgios suffered a bizarre dip in form and concentration, played apathetically and looked completely out of it.

He somehow started the second set with a break, but alternated between aces and double faults, and would contest entire rallies by hitting forehand slices.

It was obvious he was physically starting to struggle when we saw a hint of a limp in his movement, and he held his hip from time to time. Kyrgios had hip trouble before his more recent elbow injury and it’s possible that injury has flared up.

Despite all that, Kyrgios walked away the winner, following up on his week in Stuttgart, where he lost to Roger Federer in a third-set tiebreak in the semi-finals, with a first victory over Murray in six meetings.

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