Egyptian tennis player Karim Hossam banned for life for match-fixing

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Karim Hossam peaked at No. 337 in the world in 2013.

Egyptian tennis player Karim Hossam has been banned for life and fined $15,000 after being convicted of multiple match-fixing offences, the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU) announced on Tuesday.

Hossam was found guilty of 16 corruption charges under Section D of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Program. These included match-fixing, facilitating betting, providing inside information and failing to report corrupt approaches to the TIU.

“The case was based on a TIU investigation and adjudicated by independent Anti-Corruption Hearing Officer (AHO) Jane Mulcahy QC,” read a statement from the TIU.

“The breaches of the sport’s anti-corruption code were committed at ITF Futures tournaments over a five-year period between 2013 and 2017.

“Mr Hossam has been subject to a provisional suspension imposed by AHO Mulcahy in June 2017, which has subsequently prevented him playing in or attending any authorised tennis events.”

The lifetime ban applies with immediate effect and means Hossam is not allowed to compete in, or attend, any sanctioned events organised or recognised by the governing bodies of the sport. Hossam can appeal the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Hossam was a promising junior ranked No. 11 in the world junior rankings, and peaked at No. 337 on the men’s circuit in 2012. His younger brother Youssef, 20, is the current Egypt No. 2 and is ranked 320 in the world.

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Roger Federer started his Wimbledon title defence with a bang, cruising past Dusan Lajovic 6-1, 6-3, 6-4, and showcasing his new clothing sponsor, Uniqlo, after terminating his 24-year contract with Nike.

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