US Open stats preview: Roger Federer and Serena Williams chasing history

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The US Open commences on Monday with the top half of both the men’s and women’s draws in action, which means defending champions Rafael Nadal and Sloane Stephens will take to the court on opening day.

Former winners Serena Williams, Stan Wawrinka, and Andy Murray will also play their opening rounds on Monday, while Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic kick off his campaigns on Tuesday.

Known before 1968 as the US National Championships, the US Open is the second-oldest of the four Grand Slams after Wimbledon, and the only one to have been played each year since its inception in 1881.

First held in 1887, the US Open women’s singles championship is being staged for the 132nd time.

Here’s a look at some of the standout stats and figures ahead of the 2018 US Open.

MEN’S EVENT

0 – players in the Open Era have managed to win the US Open without dropping a set.

3 – matches lost by top-seeded Rafael Nadal in 2018 — the same number he lost in 2013 entering the US Open. Nadal is 40-3 this season and was 53-3 at the start of the 2013 US Open, where he won his 13th Grand Slam title.

6 – Roger Federer is targeting a sixth US Open title which would give him sole ownership of the top spot on the leaderboard of most trophies won here in the Open Era. He is currently in a three-way tie with Jimmy Connors and Pete Sampras with five.

7 – former US Open champions present in the 2018 draw: Nadal (2010, 2013, 2017), Stan Wawrinka (2016), Novak Djokovic (2011, 2015), Marin Cilic (2014), Andy Murray (2012), Juan Martin del Potro (2009), Roger Federer (2004-08).

9 – Former US Open junior champions in the draw: Felix Auger-Aliassime (2016), Taylor Fritz (2015), Borna Coric (2013), Jack Sock (2010), Grigor Dimitrov (2008), Ricardas Berankis (2007), Andy Murray (2004), Richard Gasquet (2002), Gilles Muller (2001).

10 – years since Federer last won the US Open.

11 – former college players in the draw

13 – The ‘Big Four’ have dominated the top two spots in the world rankings for the past 13 years. That could change after the US Open with Juan Martin Del Potro and Alexander Zverev both having a chance to surpass Federer and become the new world No. 2.

(via US Open preview notes)

(via US Open preview notes)

13 – months since the ‘Big Four’ all competed at the same tournament. Their last reunion was at Wimbledon 2017. They finally reunite again at this US Open.

16 – NextGen (21-and-under) players in the draw: Hubert Hurkacz (21), Lloyd Harris (21), Alexander Zverev (21), Jaume Munar (21), Andrey Rublev (20), Taylor Fritz (20), Michael Mmoh (20), Frances Tiafoe (20), Ugo Humbert (20), Stefanos Tsitsipas (20), Casper Ruud (19), Alex de Minaur (19), Denis Shapovalov (19), Corentin Moutet (19), Felix Auger-Aliassime (18), Jenson Brooksby (17).

37 – At 37 years of age, Federer is bidding to become the oldest US Open champion in the Open Era, and oldest US Open finalist since 1974.

42 – 30-and-over players in the draw.

WOMEN’S EVENT

2 – players are seeded for the first time at a Grand Slam: Aryna Sabalenka (No. 26) and Maria Sakkari (No. 32).

6 – players in the draw are undefeated in US Open first round matches: Venus Williams (19-0), Serena Williams (17-0), Patty Schnyder (14-0), Agnieszka Radwanska (12-0), Maria Sharapova (11-0) and Victoria Azarenka (10-0).

7 – former US Open champions in the draw: Sloane Stephens (2017), Angelique Kerber (2016), Svetlana Kuznetsova (2004), Maria Sharapova (2006), Samantha Stosur (2011), Serena Williams (1999, 2002, 2008, 2012-14) and Venus Williams (2000, 2001).

17 – In the Open Era, the reigning Wimbledon champion has gone on to win the US Open 17 times. Kerber would be the first player since Serena in 2012 to pull off that feat.

(Coaches' records via WTA notes)

(Coaches’ records via WTA notes)

22 – There have been 22 successful women’s singles title defences at the US Open. Sloane Stephens will try to make that figure 23.

24 – Serena Williams is chasing an all-time record 24th Grand Slam title which would equal Margaret Court’s tally.

44 – Simona Halep will maintain her position as world No. 1 irrespective of her US Open result. It will take her total tally to 44 weeks at the summit, including this next fortnight.

80 – Venus Williams is appearing in her Open Era record 80th Grand Slam main draw.

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US Open first Grand Slam to introduce shot clock to main draw - How do the players feel about it?

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The on-court shot clock has made several appearances over the past 12 months, starting with the qualifying tournament at the US Open last year, the Next Gen ATP Finals in Milan and more recently during the US Open Series events.

Next week, it will make its Grand Slam main draw debut at the US Open in efforts to limit time taken between points and ensure players adhere to warm-up and changeover times.

The shot clock, which counts down from 25 seconds between points and is started manually by the chair umpire when he/she calls out the score, has been met with mixed reviews from the players who have experienced it in the past few weeks in Canada, Cincinnati or other events.

Some find it useful, others find it stressful, and some imply it actually helps them slow down before serving, which perhaps means the shot clock might end up adding time to an overall match rather than the other way around.


Here’s what some of the top players had to say about it.








SLOANE STEPHENS


“I think it’s really important to keep the game authentic. I think that sometimes we try to get a little bit too creative. I think that the shot clock is another human, like, to start it, to stop it, whatever. It’s all human, whatever.


“I think at a point in the match where it’s really close and all of a sudden you get a shot clock violation but two points before that it wasn’t even started on time, like, I think those types of things are just kind of up in the air.


“But I think, I mean, it’s okay. Like, it’s not bad. I mean, you have to pay attention more. Something else to focus on, something else to look out when you look up before you serve. But, I mean, we’ll see if it stays, it goes, what happens.”


PETRA KVITOVA


“Actually I’m fine with that. I got a time violation already, but I don’t think it was my fault, but okay. Overall it’s fine.


“I got some talks sometimes before [about my speed between points] from the chair umpire but I really try. No I think I was okay playing the matches in Montreal [with the shot clock]. I don’t think I’m that slow.”


ELINA SVITOLINA


“It’s actually quite cool because I’m always so quick so now I can take my time more. It does help definitely because I think I’m really, really quick. Sometimes I don’t even make a decision where I’m going to serve next so now I can see that I still have 15 seconds and I can take my time to think about what I’m going to do.


“I think only Nick Kyrgios is the quickest player ever. And Federer as well.”




GARBINE MUGURUZA


“If I’m looking forward to [playing with the shot clock]? Not Really. I think a lot of people will struggle with that because I know some people are slower, some people are faster. I’m pretty normal I think. Sometimes you’re a little too slow but sometimes you have a 45-balls rally, so it’s understandable. It’s, I don’t know. We’ll see how I feel but I’m sure people will be a little itchy.”


CAROLINE GARCIA


“I think it’s alright. I thought it was going to be faster. But actually it starts when the umpire says the score so sometimes there’s a bit of a delay between the end of the point and the time he’s saying the score so most of the time I still have 15 or 10 seconds and I’m alright. I think it’s good because it’s fair for everyone and you can see it, you don’t have to ask the umpire. It makes it more clear for everyone.


“The first match I was looking at it a little bit because I had no idea how slow I was going but now I know my timing is pretty okay so I’m alright.”


MARIN CILIC


“The shot clock, it’s not bad. I think it’s good, it’s interesting for the fans. The only thing for us is we need to still adapt to it. In some cases you’re watching the clock when it’s going to wind down and you’re not sure exactly how much time you have left and you can see the guys before the serve watching how many seconds they have left. I think the guys are going to get used to it.”


CAROLINE WOZNIACKI


“I’m still not sure about the shot clock how I feel about it. I play pretty fast to be honest. I noticed in Montreal last week that the only thing that a couple of times I got close was getting out of the chair when they call time. By the time you get from the chair over to get your ball and then get ready for the serve I’m like ‘oh gosh, I have five seconds left’ and you’re like stressed. So maybe that’s one point where I’m like ‘okay, give us a little time’. But other than that it isn’t something that I would really stress about or anything.”



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Andy Murray and Juan Martin del Potro enter US Open with contrasting expectations

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They’re both former US Open champions, share a long history together, and have been drawn to potentially face-off in the third round in New York, but Andy Murray and Juan Martin del Potro enter the final Grand Slam of the season in very different places and with contrasting approaches.

Del Potro is ranked a career-high No. 3 in the world and has won 37 matches this year. Only three players have posted more victories on tour in 2018. The 29-year-old Argentine has finally moved past the three wrist surgeries that nearly ended his career and is back to becoming a force to be reckoned with on the tennis court.

Already a two-time titlist this season, Del Potro has made two semi-finals and one quarter-final in his last four Slams and is now back to his beloved US Open, where he has experienced his first and only major title triumph back in 2009.

“I’m feeling good. I’m in good shape. As everybody knows, this is my favourite tournament on tour, which I have big expectations at, playing in New York,” said a cool and confident Del Potro on Friday ahead of his first round against American qualifier Donald Young on Monday.

The ‘Tower of Tandil’ has reached the quarter-finals or better in five of his nine US Open appearances and has a 29-8 win-loss record at the tournament.

New York often has a magical effect on Del Potro and last year, he came back from the brink against Dominic Thiem despite being ill and trailing the Austrian two-sets-to-love. He went on to defeat Roger Federer in the quarters before losing to Rafael Nadal in the semis.

While he still has to be meticulous when it comes to his body and recovery, Del Potro is miles away from three years ago, fighting so hard to salvage his career.

“The most important thing that all my injuries and problems is completely in the past. Now I’m feeling good. Sometimes I have to deal with any pain on my wrist, which is normal after all my surgeries,” he explains.

“But I think it’s amazing for me just thinking about tennis, don’t talk anymore about the injuries, which is the most important thing to myself and come to this tournament thinking about my highest ranking or my big expectations playing the tournament. It’s the best things I could feel before a tournament.”

For Murray, expectations will have to remain in check for now as he slowly recaptures his pre-hip surgery form. The Scot will be contesting his first Slam since Wimbledon 2017 and is just seven matches into his comeback from injury.

He skipped the last six months of 2017 then had an operation in January that kept him sidelined until June this year. He opted out of playing Wimbledon, which means the US Open will be his first best-of-five test in 14 months.

“It feels slightly different, this one because for the last 10 years or so I’ve been coming and trying to prepare to win the event, whereas I don’t feel like that’s realistic for me this year. It’s a slightly different mentality for me coming in than what I have had the last 10, 11 years of my life,” said the 31-year-old Murray. “That feels a bit odd.”

The US Open is where Murray captured his first Grand Slam title, in 2012, after losing all of his four previous major finals. The former world No. 1 opens his campaign on Monday against Australia’s James Duckworth before a possible second round against either Feliciano Lopez or Fernando Verdasco. Del Potro could be waiting for him in round three.

#tokyo2020 floor gymnastics…😂😂🤷‍♂️

A post shared by Andy Murray (@andymurray) on


“I’m happy that I’m able to be back competing again here. It was tough missing it last year. I was pretty upset at the time. Yeah, really, really pleased to be back. I’ll try to enjoy it as much as I can,” said Murray, who is currently ranked 378 in the world.

Will his body be ready for best-of-five matches?

“I need to see. I haven’t played one, so you don’t know until you actually get out there and do it. That’s the thing,” said Murray.

“I played some long matches in Washington. They were all over two-and-a-half hours, and a three-hour match. Three of them in four days. The benefit of the slams is having that day off to recover in between, which will help me.”

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