Caroline Wozniacki wins Australian Open: Key stats behind Dane's first Grand Slam title win

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Caroline Wozniacki claimed her first Grand Slam title on Saturday, beating Romanian Simona Halep 7-6, 3-6, 6-4 in a tense two-hour 49-minute battle.

The Dane will return to the No. 1 spot in the rankings following her triumph on Rod Laver Arena.

Wozniacki and Halep were both going for their first Grand Slam trophy, in their third major final.

The 27-year-old Wozniacki had previously lost two US Open finals, in 2009 and 2014.

She ended 2017 by claiming the WTA Finals title and started 2018 by reaching the Auckland final and now winning the Australian Open.

Here, we look at the key stats behind Wozniacki’s maiden Slam success.

1 – Grand Slam title for Wozniacki from three finals reached.

1 – Wozniacki is the first player from Denmark to win a Grand Slam singles title.

3 – finals reached for Wozniacki in her last three tournaments.

4 – Wozniacki now ranks fourth for total career prize money, overtaking Agnieszka Radwanska and Victoria Azarenka as she crosses the $30million mark. Only Serena Williams, Venus Williams and Maria Sharapova have earned more prize money.

4 – wins and 6 losses for Wozniacki against world No. 1s, following her triumph over Halep on Saturday.

5 – wins and two losses for Wozniacki against Halep.

5 – Wozniacki is only the fifth player born in the 1990s to win a Grand Slam women’s singles title.

5 – Wozniacki is the fifth woman to save at least one match point en route to winning the Australian Open title.

6 – years since Wozniacki was last ranked No. 1 in the world. She will return to that spot on Monday for the first time since January 29, 2012. This is a WTA rankings record time between stints at No. 1.

11 – match wins and just one loss for Wozniacki so far in 2018.

12 – different first-time Grand Slam winners in the last 31 women’s Grand Slams.

14 – times the Australian Open women’s singles title was won by the No. 2 seed (Wozniacki won on Saturday as the No. 2 seed).

15 – wins (and 6 losses) against top-10 opponents for Wozniacki since the start of 2017 – more than any other player on tour.

23 – hard court titles for Wozniacki throughout her career.

42 – the average rank of Wozniacki’s opponents this Australian Open.

43 – Grand Slams Wozniacki has competed in to finally claim a title. She is fourth on the list of most Grand Slam appearances before winning her first title.

48 – Wozniacki is the 48th player in the Open Era to win a Grand Slam women’s singles title.

71 – tour-level match wins for Wozniacki since the start of 2017 – more than any other player.

156 – total winners for Wozniacki throughout the tournament.

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Roger Federer marches into the Australian Open final as Chung Hyeon retires

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Roger Federer will take on Marin Cilic in the finals.

Defending champion Roger Federer was given a simple passage through to his 30th grand slam final when Chung Hyeon unexpectedly retired in the second set of their semi-final at the Australian Open.

The young South Korean’s run to the last four has been one of the stories of the tournament and he was in big trouble on the scoreboard before he took an injury time-out for treatment to a blister on his foot when trailing 6-1 4-1.

He played two more games but, serving at 5-2 behind, Chung abruptly headed to the net to shake hands, taking the packed crowd in Rod Laver Arena completely by surprise.

There was a smattering of boos but Federer had huge sympathy for his opponent. He said: “I thought the first set was kind of normal, I couldn’t tell what was going on with my opponent.

“In the second set I started to feel he was getting a bit slower, fighting with the blisters. I’ve played with blisters in the past and it hurts a lot. At one point it’s too much. It’s better to stop. This feels bittersweet. I’m incredibly happy to be in the finals but not like this.”

Federer will play Marin Cilic on Sunday in a repeat of last summer’s Wimbledon final – when coincidentally the Croatian was in tears because of blisters – as he bids to become the first man to reach 20 grand slam singles titles.

Chung was bidding to become just the third Asian player to reach a grand slam final after former Australian Open champion Li Na and Kei Nishikori, and he had shown, particularly with his victory over Novak Djokovic in the fourth round, that he possesses the game to trouble the best.

The Korean will have bigger and better days at slams in the future but this was a difficult experience from the moment he dropped serve in the opening game.

He gave no indication that he was struggling physically until calling for the medical time-out, although he was completely unable to match Federer, who bullied the Korean with his forehand.

The near 15-year age gap was the fourth largest in a grand slam semi-final in the Open era, with the younger man having won on the previous three occasions.

But Federer has been tearing up tennis records virtually his whole career and his seventh appearance in the final here sets yet another new mark.

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Simona Halep comes full circle, Angelique Kerber is back - Three takeaways from their semi-final

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It was a match that took place in the first month of the year, but will surely be remembered at season-end as one of the best of 2018.

Simona Halep triumphed over, not only her opponent Angelique Kerber, but also herself in a three-set battle that saw both players push themselves to inconceivable levels and leave us all with dropped jaws.

Kerber saved two match points, Halep saved two matches, but it was ultimately the Romanian world No. 1 who walked away with a 6-3, 4-6, 9-7 success on Thursday to reach the Australian Open final.

It was a mental victory for Halep just as much as it was physical.

Here are takeaways from that inspiring semi-final showdown…

FULL CIRCLE FOR HALEP

Seven months ago, Halep left Roland Garros heartbroken. She was up 6-4, 3-0 against an unseeded Jelena Ostapenko in the French Open final but lost the match in three sets. Against Kerber in the Australian Open semi-finals on Thursday, Halep went up 6-3, 3-1. She was doing everything right, bringing an attacking game to an in-form Kerber, who was 14-0 win-loss in 2018.

Halep had rolled her ankle in her opener in Melbourne this fortnight and there were concerns that her tournament was already over. But she pushed herself to continue and fought through a brutal match against Lauren Davis, winning 15-13 in the final set after 3 hours and 44 minutes.

By the time she reached the semis, Halep had spent 9 hours and 56 minutes on court through five matches.

So when she went up a set and a break on Kerber within an hour in the last-four on Thursday, things were really looking up for the Romanian. But, naturally, Kerber had other ideas. The former champion has also had her fair share of battles on the Grand Slam stage and the semi-final quickly turned into a heavyweight bout.

The third set was the stuff of legends. Kerber broke first, Halep struck back. The Romanian serve for the match at 5-3, Kerber broke for 4-5 outrallying the top seed in a 26-shot exchange that ended with the German on her knees (minute 9:06 in video below). Kerber then saved two match points to level the set. Halep saved two match points in game 12 to make it 6-6.

Kerber’s legs were fading while Halep, who has been playing with a dodgy ankle was still sprinting. Halep was in mind-over-matter mode and that mind, that perhaps failed her in Paris seven months ago, was determined to get the win this time to give the Romanian a chance to her redeem herself in a third Grand Slam final.

And indeed she did it. Halep freed herself from all her demons. She overcame her fears and snatched the victory with both hands. She had the legs, she had the shots, but most of all, she had the heart.

“When I played the final at French Open I said that if I will be in the same situation I will give my best and I will be more courageous and next round I just want to give my best to believe that I have the chance to win,” Halep told Rennae Stubbs on court after the match.

Doesn’t get more courageous than that! It can all come full circle for Halep on Saturday if she defeats Caroline Wozniacki to claim a first Grand Slam title.

BOTH WOMEN WALKED AWAY WINNERS

Yes, Halep won the match and earned a place in the final but this was a contest where really nobody lost. Kerber leaves Melbourne with nothing but positives from her Australian summer. The two-time Grand Slam champion has managed to move past her 2017 woes and is back to playing some incredible tennis. She gained confidence from amassing 14 matches in a row starting with the Hopman Cup then Sydney then the Australian Open, and showed grit in her defeat to Halep. She’s back in the top-10 when the new rankings are released on Monday and we can expect her to join the hunt for No. 1 and more majors this season.

As for Halep, at this point, the result in the final doesn’t really matter. She showed herself on Thursday that she can be fearless. If she ends up losing to a better Wozniacki on Saturday, it will not shake her. She will be disappointed but not broken. The regal Romanian has risen!

SIMO CAN BE A-G-G-R-E-S-S-I-V-E

Halep smiled when a reporter told her she hit 50 winners against Kerber in the match.

“A lot, huh? My brother just wrote me. I cannot believe actually. But I was aggressive, I had this in my mind,” she said.

Is it the first time she’s hit that many winners in a clash?

“I think so, yes, and I hope it’s not the last,” she replied.

“I feel more experienced, also stronger mentally and the way I play is more aggressive, I did 50 winners, eight aces if you can imagine, my coach told me,” she later said with a hint of sarcasm in her voice.

We have seen flashes of this kind of aggressive game from Halep in the past. Her straight-sets win over Serena Williams in Singapore in 2014 comes to mind. But the way she played against Kerber was a much more mature version of that. More of the same, please!

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