RG Day 10 diary and highlights: Bacsinszky and Ostapenko to face off in semis on their birthday

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Which one will have the happier birthday?

There are 127 matches played in a Grand Slam singles main draw with millions of possible combinations of match-ups, yet somehow Timea Bacsinszky and Jelena Ostapenko share the same birthday and will face off on the day of their birthday in the Roland Garros semi-finals on Thursday, June 8, 2017.

That is one mind-boggling coincidence.

Even nuttier… If Ostapenko wins the title, it would be her very first tour-level title triumph. The last player to win their first tour-level trophy at a Grand Slam was Guga Kuerten. When did he achieve that? On June, 8, 1997 – the day Ostapenko was born! (via @fiercetennis on Twitter, heard through @benrothenberg).

Crazy twists of fate aside, the fact that we have a 19-year-old in the semi-finals of Roland Garros for the first time since Ana Ivanovic in 2007 is great news.

The stories developing this fortnight on the women’s side are really interesting if you’re following closely.

Ostapenko, a fiery, quirky Latvian teenager who is not on her best surface but has a big, aggressive game, is the second-youngest player in the top-47 (Ana Konjuh is six months younger). A couple of her fellow 1997-born players have perhaps had better results sooner than her at the Slams but she has caught up and gone even further. Prior to this season, she had played six Grand Slam main draws and lost in the first or second round in all of them.

In Melbourne last January, she made the Australian Open third round and she’s now in the Roland Garros semi-finals. That is just remarkable progress.

Anything in particular you need to know about Ostapenko? She likes ballroom dancing and her favourite dance is the Samba. “I actually think because of the music, because some really nice songs fit Samba,” she tells us.

She certainly needed quick footwork to handle the terrible wind that wreaked havoc on her quarter-final with Caroline Wozniacki on Tuesday. Those ballroom dancing classes sure came in handy.

Meanwhile Bacsinszky is continuing with her dream return to the sport. The Swiss had quit tennis, worked in a restaurant at a hotel, but returned with a bang, making the semis at Roland Garros two years ago. She was playing her third consecutive French Open quarter-final on Tuesday and is now into her second semi in three years.

She finds the fact that she’ll be playing Ostapenko on the day of their birthdays fairly amusing.

“It’s pretty funny. I think it’s pretty cool, though. I saw her in the gym just right after our matches today, and so we both said, like, mutually to each other, Well done. We hugged each other, because, I mean, she’s a really nice girl,” said Bacsinszky, who is eight years older than Ostapenko.

Rain canceled the men’s quarter-finals on Tuesday. Here’s what you may have missed from the women’s action.

Stats of the day

10 – years since a teenager last made the semi-finals at Roland Garros prior to Ostapenko’s run this fortnight.

Quotes of the day

“Players are ready. Please sit as quickly as you can.”
— A hilarious Timea Bacsinszky pretends she’s an umpire for a second as she waits for reporters to take their seats for her press conferences.

“Ready? Play!”
— The brilliant follow up to Bacsinszky’s line from press conference moderator Eleanor Preston.

“You mean in the ballroom dancing? No, of course not. I was just doing some, like, Latin championships in ballroom dancing. And I think the courts I play are much bigger.”
— Ostapenko when asked if her ballroom dancing competitions as a youngster helped prepare her for the big stage in tennis.

“Stan works a lot. He falls, he gets up. He falls, he gets up. But recently he has decided not to fall.”
— Bacsinszky on Stan Wawrinka

Tweet of the day

Fail of the day

Alize Lim attempts to interview Rafael Nadal

Elsewhere…

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Nadal test not mission impossible for Carreno Busta, McEnroe has advice for young Spaniard

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On the rise: Pablo Carreno Busta.

Pablo Carreno Busta is well aware of what he’s up against when he takes on an in-form and healthy Rafael Nadal in the Roland Garros quarter-finals on Tuesday. It is by far the toughest challenge in tennis today.

Nadal has lost just two out of 101 best-of-five matches on clay throughout his entire career. That stat alone sounds discouraging. But not for the 25-year-old Carreno Busta, who is having his best season to date and is playing his maiden Grand Slam quarter-final.

“If I think that I don’t have chances, I will not play. So for sure I think I have chances,” the Spaniard told reporters at the French Open.

“Is really difficult, because Rafa is maybe the best player in this surface of the history, and he’s playing really good, but I will try. I’m playing good. I’m with a lot of confidence.”

Carreno Busta has every reason to feel confident. He has won 27 matches in 2017 (fourth-most on tour), including a title run on the clay of Estoril, a runner-up showing in Rio, and a semi-final run at Indian Wells.

  • WATCH John McEnroe’s advice for Carreno Busta:


His trip to the Roland Garros quarters means he will move back into the top eight in the ATP Race to London standings, solidifying his position as one of the best players on tour so far this season.

Carreno Busta is 0-3 against Nadal head-to-head but he took a set off him in Doha last year. They haven’t faced off since the Rio Olympics last summer.

Carlos Moya, Nadal’s coach, has seen a significant change in Carreno Busta’s game over the past 18 months or so.

“Even last year I realised he was more aggressive, that’s what I thought when I was coaching Milos (Raonic), we played against him. But I followed him throughout the year and I’ve realised that he’s more aggressive now than he used to be,” said Moya, a Roland Garros champion in 1998.

“Before he was just high intensity but not really many winners, but now I feel that if he has an easy ball that ball doesn’t come back. That’s the way tennis is played nowadays, that’s how it works. It took him a while to realise but now he’s doing that very well, probably his team and coach are helping him a lot and he’s a dangerous player.”

Carreno Busta comes off as a laid back character off the court. He’s always smiling, has a funny personality in press conferences and is enjoying the big stage now that he’s reached it.

“You are a very good tennis player, but not so good at match points,” a journalist joked with him after his narrow win over Milos Raonic in the fourth round that required seven match points before he sealed the deal.

“Thank you,” Carreno Busta quipped back with a grin.

That winning feeling: Carreno Busta after beating Raonic.

That winning feeling: Carreno Busta after beating Raonic.

It was Carreno Busta’s first top-10 win, ending a 16-match losing streak against such opposition.

When he was asked if he had his eyes on the ATP Finals in London at the end of the year, now that he’s in the top-eight in the Race, he Gijon-native said: “London (smiling). Nice city. But I think is not a real goal to be in London. Maybe in a few months I hope that we continue thinking about this, or you continue thinking about this. And we’ll see. But at the moment, I just thinking about Rafa,” he admitted.

Carreno Busta made his Davis Cup debut for Spain last year and team captain Conchita Martinez had nothing but praise for him.

“He has a good character, he’s laid back but also goes for his shots,” said Martinez. “I think he’s believing more in his possibilities at the moment. He’s breaking through so many things right now. To be here and playing Rafa is going to be amazing I think. He was looking up to him and now he gets to play him.”

Carreno Busta has spent almost four more hours on court this fortnight in Paris compared to Nadal, who has blasted through his opening four rounds in sensational fashion, dropping a total of just 20 games.

“For me, Rafa is the best player on this surface. He’s a really good friend. So it will be a really special match for me. I will try to enjoy this match and learn a lot. I will play against the best. And then we’ll see. Maybe I play and I lose easy or maybe I play and I win easy. You never know,” said Carreno Busta.

Moya feels Nadal’s form right now in Paris is the “perfect situation” as the Mallorcan attempts to become the first man to reach 10 semi-finals at Roland Garros.

“It hasn’t surprised me (how well Nadal is playing),” says Moya.

“This is probably the best tennis he’s playing since the beginning of the year, now he has the confidence of all these matches that he won since January. In January he was practicing very well, he was healthy, but he needed those matches that take you to 100 per cent of your potential.

“Now he’s not there, he’s close to that. It’s the perfect situation for us. If you asked me two months ago how would I like to get here I would tell you the way he’s playing now.”

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RG day 9 diary and highlights: Women's 'open' field full of delicious suspense

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Front-runner? Simona Halep.

For the first time in 40 years, the women’s quarter-final line-up at Roland Garros consists of no previous Grand Slam champions.

We will get a brand new major winner on Saturday and it’s fair to say each of the eight women still standing can lift the title.

The most repetitive line we’ve heard this fortnight has revolved around how “open” the women’s draw is this year but it’s also worth noting that five of the quarter-finalists (Svitolina, Pliskova, Wozniacki, Halep, Mladenovic) came to Paris ranked inside the top seven in the Porsche Race to Singapore leaderboard – meaning they’ve already had very strong seasons coming into this.

Yes, the title is anyone’s to win, but how is that worse than if we already knew who was going to grab the trophy a few days into the tournament, or before it even started? I for one am loving the suspense and I’m very curious to see who will rise to the occasion and take this opportunity by the horns.

“For sure there’s going to be a changing of the guard,” is how ex-world No1 Lindsay Davenport put it. “Two through 18 (in the rankings), it seems like it’s not that big a difference. Maybe not (Karolina) Pliskova, but it’s still land of opportunity.

“We’ll see who holds up under that pressure. But it wouldn’t surprise me if we had a different Grand Slam champion in Wimbledon, and maybe even at the US Open.

“The return of Vika (Azarenka) especially on hard courts, she hasn’t been in the mix obviously for over a year. I think (Maria) Sharapova the more she plays… I just want to see everybody back healthy playing, because that’s when any sport is at its best. Hopefully this time next year we’ll have everybody playing, everybody healthy, all the big names.”

The likes of Azarenka and Sharapova will no doubt feel that the landscape has significantly changed in their absence, with a few of the women separating themselves a little from the chasing pack.

A compelling factor over the next few days is that Pliskova and Halep can actually play for the No1 ranking. Pliskova is two wins away while Halep needs three victories to replace Angelique Kerber at the top.

Davenport initially had Halep as the favourite for the title but she also feels the scales have tipped slightly towards local star Kristina Mladenovic, who has capitalised on the home support to get through some brutal battles so far this tournament.

“I think Mladenovic might have a slight edge because she’s got the crowd, and she’s got their energy and she knows how to use them,” said the American retired three-time Slam champion.

“It’s been very rare that a player can come in and get 15,000 people chanting and yelling for them and not feel pressure and not feel scared and she’s embracing it. That’s half the battle when you’re playing at home.”

It’s no secret that whoever is the strongest mentally will end up taking this title and Davenport agrees.

“With opportunity comes pressure, and who’s going to hold up the best? Halep who three years ago it was like she will win a major. She looks so good here, that brutal final against Maria, such high quality. And it seems like sometimes it got to her. The pressure and opportunities… it’s so hard to pick,” said Davenport, who is the current coach of world No13 Madison Keys.

“She was my favourite to win the tournament but you look at the other players – I don’t know, if Svitolina is not healthy, which I heard today she not 100 per cent (against Martic), I didn’t see it. You’ve got to think that Halep’s kind of the favourite in that bottom half.”

Moving on to some highlights, here’s what you may have missed from day 9 at Roland Garros…

Points of the day

Ignore the moonballs, wait for the smooth hands.

Special Kei!

Stats of the day

7 — Roland Garros quarter-finals Murray has now reached to take sole ownership of fourth place among active players with the most last-eight appearances at the French Open.

15 — aces for Caroline Garcia so far this tournament. Tied in second place with Jelena Ostapenko overall behind Kiki Bertens who hit 17.

650 — tour-level match wins for Murray after his victory over Karen Khachanov on Monday.

Quotes of the day

“I think it meant a lot that he took that decision. Helped me. I just felt that it was like a shock, because I lost the coach. So I have just to improve in this way, because he never had something to complain about my game and about the work that I do, because I’m working. But just with my attitude. I knew that is the only one thing that I have to change to have him back.”
— Simona Halep on how briefly losing her coach Darren Cahill this year got her back on track.

“It was the coldest kiss I had in my life, but it was a kiss (smiling). It’s a good point already, and I was actually also surprised. I was not expecting that she wanted to give me a kiss. And I liked it. I mean, it was good to finish on this note, you know, like I wouldn’t have liked like just a handshake, like very cold. I’m not this kind of person. I’m a very nice person. I don’t like the conflict. So I told her good luck, and I mean it.”
— Alize Cornet on the unexpected kiss she got from Garcia after their fourth round despite the off-court tension between them.

“I was just so happy. I just went for it. I mean, everyone was waiting for a very cold match. Everyone was surprised, maybe it’s going to be a battle or whatever. But, I mean, I just tried to stay like a professional player. I play tennis because I enjoy it, and I don’t want to get any fight with anyone. What happen, happened. We never forget about it. Tennis is a game. I play to enjoy and that’s it.”
— Garcia on opting to kiss Cornet at the net after their match.


“Actually I’m very bad with the memories (smiling). I don’t even know if I win or lost. I won?”
— Kei Nishikori when asked about his 2016 US Open win over Andy Murray. It was obviously not that memorable!

Comeback of the day

Elina Svitolina

The Ukrainian No5 seed rallied back from 2-5, 0-30 down in the final set against Petra Martic to turns things around and get the win 4-6, 6-3, 7-5. How did she do it?

Tweet of the day

Such bad luck for David Goffin. Come back soon!

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