Indian Wells: Can Kyrgios make it two wins from two against Federer?

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Federer and Kyrgios are set to clash for the second time.

Having seen off Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic respectively, Federer and Kyrgios are set to do battle in the last eight of the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 event.

However, for Federer, facing the talented Australian won’t recall good memories as the Canberra native won their only previously meeting in 2015.

Kyrgios edged the Swiss in a three-set epic, 6-7 (2) 7-6 (5) 7-6 (12) in the round of 32, on clay, at the Madrid Open event two years.

There was little to separate them that day and the match is remembered for a gruelling third set tie-breaker, which of course went the way of the Aussie.

So, can Federer level up their head-to-head or will Krygios take a 2-0 lead?

Share with us your thoughts by commenting below, using #360fans on Twitter or getting in touch via Facebook.

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Lucky loser Nishioka pulls off epic comeback to beat Berdych in Indian Wells

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Massive comeback: From Yoshihito Nishioka,

Japanese lucky loser Yoshihito Nishioka continued his giant-killing spree in Indian Wells by pulling off a tremendous comeback to take out No13 seed Tomas Berdych and reach the fourth round.

The diminutive Nishioka, who beat 19th-seeded ace machine Ivo Karlovic in round two, fought back from a 1-6, 2-5 deficit to outlast Berdych 1-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4 in a two-hour, 21-minute battle.

Nishioka, who lost to Elias Ymer in the final round of qualifying, only made it into the draw after Dmitry Tursunov withdrew with a leg injury. In an ironic twist of fate, Nishioka faced Ymer again, this time in the first round of the main draw, and beat the Swede to advance.

Following his impressive wins of Karlovic (who is 41cm taller than him) and Berdych, the 21-year-old Nishioka is now the first lucky loser to reach the fourth round at Indian Wells.

His win over Berdych was the biggest of his career and just the second over a top-20 player.

The 70th-ranked Japanese lefty next takes on third-seeded Stan Wawrinka, who beat Germany’s Philipp Kohlschreiber 7-5, 6-3 to make the last-16.

“Today was wonderful coming back. But at the beginning I didn’t play my best tennis, but this is, I think, not technique and just on mentality, and then I never lost my mentality. That’s why I think I won today,” said Nishioka after his triumphant comeback.

“I was down 1-6, 2-5, and I tried to do my best, but today I couldn’t figure out how can I beat Berdych,” explained

“But down 2-5, I tried to find a way, and then I think he gave me a little bit chances. So I find a way, and then just kept trying every point. Then he showed me, like, a little bit angry, a little bit feeling tired. So I figured out how to win from down 2-5.

“And then my body feeling like I cannot move, like, that much, but just stay on focus and try fight. And then I find a way.”

Berdych, a semi-finalist in Indian Wells in 2013, held match point in the 10th game of the second set and served for the win twice but unraveled against an inspired Nishioka.

After Nishioka forced the decisive set by winning the tiebreaker, the two traded breaks to open the third before Nishioka broke for a 2-1.

Although Berdych saved one match point in the ninth game, Nishioka closed it out in the next with a love game to reach the fourth round of a Masters tournament for the first time.

Nishioka said he didn’t change his game plan match to complete his comeback but he noticed Berdych was visibly “nervous”.

“I think (in his) last match against Fratangelo, the time he was, I think, nervous as well in the second set. So I can see he’s going to be nervous. So, I mean, I didn’t know he gonna do, like, unforced errors like today. But, yeah, but I knew he gonna be nervous. I knew it,” added Nishioka.

Wawrinka reached the fourth round by maintaining his clean record against Kohlschreiber, making it five wins in five encounters with the German.

“It was a really good match,” said Wawrinka, who owns three grand slam titles but has won just one of the tour’s coveted Masters titles.

“The first set was not easy, for sure, but in general I’m happy with my game. I was serving well. I think I’m moving better and better and it’s all positive so far.”

With superstars Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer all jammed into the bottom quarter of the draw, Wawrinka’s path looks wide open. But the Swiss said he didn’t think of it that way.

“It’s not like I have been in a lot of semi-finals, finals in Masters 1000,” said Wawrinka. “So I need to focus on every match.”

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WATCH: Federer's five best performances of all time

Sport360 staff 13/03/2017

We've taken a trip down memory lane and revisited the Swiss's best showings on a tennis court.

These are the performances that went a long way to cementing his legendary status.

Share with us your thoughts by commenting below, using #360fans on Twitter or getting in touch via Facebook.

5) US Open 2005 Final - Federer defeats Agassi 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 Playing the great American under the Flushing Meadows lights, in what was Agassi's last Grand Slam final, was a real treat for Federer and he produced some magical tennis to win his second title in New York. It prompted 35-year-old Agassi to say: "I think Roger is the best I've played against. To watch him evolve has been amazing." That's some compliment. 4) French Open 2009 4th Round - Federer defeats Haas 6-7 (4), 5-7, 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 This was undoubtedly the key match during Federer's run through to his one and only Roland Garros title. Playing against his close friend Tommy Haas, the Swiss had to battle back from two sets down to keep his French Open dream alive. The fact Rafael Nadal had exited the tournament at the same hurdle was obviously playing on Federer's mind but he dug deep when it mattered to finish the job strongly in the fifth. 3) London 2012 Olympics semi-final: Federer defeats Del Potro 3-6 7-6 19-17 The four-hour, 26-minute battle was the encounter of the tournament and longest tennis match in Olympics history. Federer had to produce his greatest tennis to overcome an attacking onslaught from Juan Martin del Potro. The third set, which spanned two hours and 43 minutes, took every ounce of energy and effort out of Federer as he finally prevailed on Centre Court. For Federer, the manner of the semi-final victory must have almost felt like a final win and in truth he had little left in the tank as Andy Murray went on to thrash the Swiss in straight sets in the final. It was true redemption for the Scot after losing to Federer in the Wimbledon final on the same court only a matter of weeks earlier. 2) Australian Open 2017 Final - Federer defeats Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 A few of you will be surprised that Federer's historic 18th Grand Slam victory didn't top the bill. The maestro's Melbourne success was the stuff of dreams and probably the most memorable match of his entire career. But, aside from his stellar comeback in the fifth set when he looked down and out, it was a victory which carried a lot more weight due to the nature of his return from injury and beating long-term nemesis Nadal. Those factors certainly outweigh the overall performance of Federer. 1) Wimbledon 2012 semi-final - Federer defeats Murray 7-5 7-5 6-4 The Swiss star enjoyed a truly vintage Friday afternoon in the London sun and produced an absolute masterclass, particularly on serve, to reach his 10th Wimbledon final. Federer was at his sheer best and took Murray apart in straight sets - dropping just 21 points on serve in two hours and seven minutes. He also only faced one break point in the entire match - which came in the very first game of the semi-final. RF's first serve percentage was around 80 per cent throughout and Murray could simply not lay a glove on him, as he backed this up with solid net and groundstroke play. Federer went onto lose to Novak Djokovic in the final for the second consecutive year.

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