Rafael Nadal: No-coaching rule during matches absurd

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Rafael Nadal in action during his first round match against Thomaz Bellucci.

Rafael Nadal finds the no-coaching rule during matches “absurd” saying the reason why it was created many years ago no longer exists.

– GALLERY: Top ten Wimbledon upsets of all-time
– Diary: Tournament steeped in tradition serves up unique affair
– Wimbledon: Federer, Nadal and Kvitova all advance with ease
– Djokovic: Lucky bird helps Serbian advance into round two

Coaches are not allowed to communicate with their players in any form during grand slam and ATP matches but Boris Becker recently revealed that he has his own way of sending signals to his charge, Novak Djokovic, while the Serb is on court.

Nadal was asked to weigh in on how he felt about the rule and while the Spaniard said he complies by it, he doesn’t find it applicable to the current times on tour.

“At the end, I’m going to be very frank with you. I don’t know what the story is (with Becker), but that rule of not being able to talk during the match, we all try to comply by it because it is a rule. But it’s an old regulation. It was logical many years ago because some players had coaches, and others didn’t, so this was protection for those who didn’t have coaches,” explained Nadal.

“But now everybody has a coach so today I don’t see any player in this circuit who doesn’t have a coach so it’s rather absurd that everyone pays for a coach to help him and then when you need him the most you can’t talk to him. But rules are rules. But if you ask me my opinion, I’ve given you my opinion now.”

Ironically, Thomaz Bellucci, Nadal’s opening round opponent does not currently have a coach according to the ATP match notes.

Most popular

Australia's Nick Kyrgios unconcerned by 'bad boy' image

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Strong minded: Kyrgios.

Nick Kyrgios may be shaping up to be the bad boy of Australian tennis but the fiery 20-year-old is not concerned about how he is being perceived.

– GALLERY: Top ten Wimbledon upsets of all-time
– Diary: Tournament steeped in tradition serves up unique affair
– Wimbledon: Federer, Nadal and Kvitova all advance with ease
– Djokovic: Lucky bird helps Serbian advance into round two

The young Aussie, who faces Argentina’s Juan Monaco on Wednesday on Court 18, is one of the emerging characters on tour but does not always say or do the right thing.

Bringing a lot of swagger to the tennis court, Kyrgios, who exploded onto the scene when he beat Rafael Nadal in the Wimbledon fourth round last season, often loses it on the court and was heard saying “dirty scum” during his opening match on Monday following an argument with umpire Mohamed Lahyani.

Kyrgios explained the words were not directed towards anyone but himself but some can be forgiven for finding some of his behaviour inappropriate at times.

Asked how he felt about being branded a “bad boy” Kyrgios said: “I don’t know what to answer. I don’t know. I play the sport the way I play it. I’m not going to change…

“I think the sport needs characters. I feel like it’s good when you see someone that’s raw and just plays the game the way they play it, doesn’t really worry about other stuff when they’re out there.”

He added that it wouldn’t bother him one bit if he was slapped with a fine for audible obscenity during that match.

In the press room, Kyrgios is often funny or irritable and sometimes both at once.

“Why are you so caught up about the question?” he said the other day when quizzed about his cursing on court.

An avid basketball fan, Kyrgios used to play the game when he was younger before choosing tennis full-time. He spends hours watching it on TV and finds it entertaining in many aspects – aspects that are not really present in tennis.

“I just love basketball as a sport. I think it’s exciting. It’s always exciting. Always something happening.  There were parts of today where it was really quiet in my match,” he said after his first round win.

“I just enjoy the whole aspect of the team environment. I’m wearing a shooting sleeve on my left arm for some reason this week. I don’t really know why.”

Kyrgios’ game seems tailored for grass, with his booming serve and powerful forehand, but he says it’s actually not his favourite surface.

He’s playing just his second Wimbledon main draw but despite having little experience at this level, he already has two grand slam quarter-final appearances under his belt.

“This time around, I felt I experienced some of these things before,” said the No 26 seed. “Being two sets to love down at Wimbledon, coming back, I’ve done that. Winning a tight first round last year, I’ve done that. Beating the No1 player in the world on Centre Court, I’ve done that.

“I just feel I am maybe more comfortable this time around. Maybe not so experienced, but I feel I’m aware of my surroundings. I’m in the championship locker room as well. That’s new to me. It’s only the start of my career. I’m still learning every time I play a grand slam.”

Most popular

Simona Halep and Eugenie Bouchard crash out of Wimbledon first round

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Halep (l) was a surprise 1st round victim.

Eugenie Bouchard was knocked out in the first round at Wimbledon as one of the biggest stars of the grand slam 12 months ago became the first big-name casualty of this year’s tournament.

– GALLERY: Top ten Wimbledon upsets of all-time
– Diary: Tournament steeped in tradition serves up unique affair
– Wimbledon: Federer, Nadal and Kvitova all advance with ease
– Djokovic: Lucky bird helps Serbian advance into round two

Canadian Bouchard marched through to the 2014 final, where Petra Kvitova denied her the title, but has endured a terrible season on tour and the Wimbledon exit adds to her troubles.

She lost 7-6 (7/3) 6-4 to China’s Duan Ying-Ying on Court Three, sealing her own fate by cracking a forehand into the net.

Elsewhere in the women’s draw, third-seeded Romanian Simona Halep was also on the wrong end of a shock, losing in the first round 5-7, 6-4, 6-3 to Jana Cepelova of Slovakia.

Halep reached the semi-finals 12 months ago, just a month after finishing runner-up at the French Open.

The 22-year-old Cepelova, ranked 106 in the world, had won only one match on the tour all year before Tuesday.

She goes on to face another Romanian, Monica Niculescu, for a place in the last 32.

Most popular