Wimbledon: Wrong underwear colour gets junior players into trouble

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Wu Yibing.

Four boys in the Wimbledon junior tournament have fallen foul of the tournament’s strict all-white clothing policy after showing up on court wearing black and blue underwear.

Top seeded doubles pair Zsombor Piros of Hungary and China’s Wu Yibing were handed white underwear by a courtside official and sent back to the locker room to change.

Piros had blue underwear beneath his white shorts while fellow 17-year-old Wu had opted for black. One of their opponents, Brazil’s Joao Reis da Silva was also sanctioned but he protested, claiming his grey underwear should have been acceptable.

“We changed but the Brazilian guy refused at first because he said grey was OK,” explained Piros. “He was gone for about 30 minutes so it took a long time to start the match.”

Da Silva’s partner Mohammed Ali Bellalouna was the only player with white underwear.

Piros and Wu, the top seeds, won that match on Wednesday. However, sporting their new white underwear, they lost in the second round on Thursday against Sebastian Korda and Nicolas Meija.

“The blue and black shorts were our lucky pants,” said Piros, who had worn his more colourful attire in the early rounds of the singles tournament.

“There were no signs to indicate we were supposed to wear white underwear. I only got caught out because a little bit of blue was showing. Some umpires don’t say anything. Maybe they prefer not to focus on the underwear.”

Piros said the white replacements rustled up by tournament officials were very comfortable.

“They never asked for them back,” he added. “If I come back to play here again, I will remember not to wear blue or green.”

Despite the clothing conundrum, Piros said he wasn’t unhappy at the saga.

“I think it’s kinda funny,” he added.

Later Thursday, Austria’s Jurij Rodionov was also told to change as he had arrived on Court 18 with blue boxer shorts under his white playing gear. First the chair umpire inspected them before a female supervisor also arrived to take a peek at his undergarments.

Rodionov had to retreat to the locker room to change but maintained his composure to defeat Blake Ellis of Australia to reach the quarter-finals.

Wimbledon has clamped down on fashion faux-pas both at this tournament and in the past.

Five-time champion Venus Williams had to change her bra in a rain delay during her first round match last week as the pink straps were visible on her shoulders. The American, however, was reluctant to criticise the decision.

“I don’t want to talk about undergarments,” said the 37-year-old, who reached the final on Thursday. “It’s kind of awkward for me. I’ll leave that to you. You can talk about it with your friends. I’m going to pass.”

Roger Federer has criticised Wimbledon’s all-white rule in the past, saying it was too strict.

“We’re all white. White, white, full-on white. I think it’s very strict,” the Swiss said in 2014, after the all-white policy was updated with more restrictions, including ones related to underwear. “My personal opinion, I think it’s too strict. If you look at the pictures of Edberg, Becker, there was some colours, you know, but it was ‘all white’.”

* Provided by AFP

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Wimbledon: Venus Williams winning the title would be one of biggest sports stories ever, says Mats Wilander

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Ageless and unstoppable: Venus Williams.

Mats Wilander believes Venus Williams winning Wimbledon would be “one of the biggest sports stories ever”, if not the biggest, the Swedish legend said ahead of Thursday’s semi-finals.

At 37, Williams’ age-defying form continues to boggle the mind as the American is set to contest her third Grand Slam semi-final in her last five majors. If she beats Johanna Konta on Thursday, she will become the oldest Wimbledon finalist since Martina Navratilova in 1994. She’s also bidding to become the oldest Grand Slam champion in the Open Era, besting her sister Serena’s mark of 35 at the 2017 Australian Open.

Williams, who lives with the autoimmune disease Sjogren’s syndrome, was also in the semis at the All England Club last year, but what makes her run this fortnight all the more remarkable is what she had to go through in the build-up to the tournament.

On June 9, the seven-time major champion was involved in a car accident in Florida that led to the death of Jerome Barson, a 79-year-old, who passed away two weeks later from injuries sustained in the crash.

Williams broke into tears during her first press conference at Wimbledon when she was asked about the accident and said she was devastated. Since then, the police have found Williams to have “lawfully” entered the intersection seconds before the crash.

At such a difficult time for her, the No10 seed has somehow managed to reach the Wimbledon semi-finals, and is now two wins away from winning a first Slam since 2008.

“If she wins at 37 after what she’s been through, I mean not only the last few weeks, but with her disease, and then staying afloat while Serena (her sister) has been cleaning up over the last five or six years, that would be an incredible – literally one of the biggest sports stories you could ever experience, if not the biggest. It’s massive,” seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander told Sport360.

“Konta is most probably at the moment the better player but Venus has the confidence of playing at Wimbledon. It fits her game perfectly.

“It seems that her serve used to be a weapon on all different surfaces but it’s not anymore. It was in Australia, but the courts were really fast. And it seems that here she’s somehow serving better, and would say the reason is that the second serve is more effective here, and her slice serve, the first serve, is more effective here.

“So it looks like she’s calmer, she doesn’t go for too much, but she still gets free points. And then, she has this ability to move on grass, which is not easy when you’re as tall as she is and the court is as slippery as it is, but that has to do with confidence. She can easily win it (Wimbledon), of course.”

Williams can move back into the top five in the rankings for the first time since January 2011 if she wins the title. She has beaten a slew of young stars en route to the semis, two of which weren’t even born yet when she made her Wimbledon debut in 1997.

“At some point it was expected that Venus wasn’t going to be top-50 and we at some point nearly thought ‘well why is she out there still doing this if she’s not… how can she do it if she doesn’t know how she’s going to feel?’ So for her to be able to manage all that, and really what’s happened to her in the last month with the accident is… to overcome all that and win Wimbledon, it’s nearly like the stars are aligning for her,” added Wilander.

The winner of the contest between Williams and Konta will face Garbine Muguruza in the final.

Muguruza, who crushed Magdalena Rybarikova in the semis on Thursday, has found her way back to top form after a 12-month struggle since she won the French Open last year.

The Spaniard, who was runner-up at Wimbledon in 2015, dropped out of the top 10 after inconsistent form, but her strong run this fortnight means she can return to the top five if she wins the title.

After losing in the French Open fourth round last month to Kristina Mladenovic, Muguruza said she was actually happy that the pressure hanging over her during the time she was reigning Roland Garros champion is finally over.

Her strong form at Wimbledon suggests she is liberated from everything that was mentally holding her back.

“Of course,” Wilander agreed. “When you’re not chasing a certain dream, which for her would have been winning a Grand Slam I would think. And you win it, you have to reassess your goals. It has to be heartfelt, it’s not a logical decision, it’s a feeling you.

“And you see that with Andy Murray, and you see that with Novak Djokovic and you see that with Angelique Kerber. They just haven’t found the goal they are chasing next. And the next goal needs to be back to winning matches against the people across the net.

“I think Garbine Muguruza, that’s what she was good at when she was at her best. She took every match as the last match of the tournament and played it as the biggest match of her career. And she did that in the early rounds, and she did it at Wimbledon when she got to the final, and she did at the French.

“I think she’s found it again, and she obviously likes grass. In many ways I would say that Garbine Muguruza is the favourite to win the title.”

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Wimbledon semis preview: Venus Williams v Johanna Konta, Garbine Muguruza v Magdalena Rybarikova

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Huge clash: Johanna Konta v Venus Williams.

Each of the four Wimbledon semi-finalists has an incredible story-line around her.

From the experienced veteran excelling at 37 amid incredibly difficult circumstances, to the home favourite carrying British hopes on her shoulder, to the surprise dark horse, who was competing at an ITF event last month, to the former runner-up looking to make the most of a second chance.

Every one of Venus Williams, Johanna Konta, Magdalena Rybarikova or Garbine Muguruza would be a Wimbledon champion the tennis world would happily get behind.

Here’s a closer look at the numbers behind each semi-final match-up.

Venus Williams (USA) [10] v Johanna Konta (GBR) [6]

– At 37 years and 29 days, Venus is bidding to become the oldest Wimbledon finalist since Martina Navratilova in 1994.

– Venus is 15-6 in Grand Slam semi-final matches. 7-8 in Grand Slam finals.

– Venus has played exactly 100 Wimbledon main draw matches. She has now matched her sister Serena with 86 main draw match wins at the All England Club, the third-most in the Open Era.

– Venus is gunning for a sixth Wimbledon singles title and eighth Grand Slam trophy.

– Venus is 3-2 against top-10 opposition in 2017.

– At 37, Venus is the fourth oldest woman in history to reach the Wimbledon semis.

– Venus is playing her 75th Grand Slam main draw – an Open Era record.

– Venus could return to the top-five for the first time since January 2011 if she wins the title.

– Konta was ranked 19 in the world entering Wimbledon last year. She is the current world No7.

– Konta is the first British woman to reach the Wimbledon semi-finals since Virginia Wade in 1978.

– Konta is bidding to become the first British woman to reach the Wimbledon final since Wade in 1977.

– Konta has hit the most aces of any female player in the tournament, hitting 28 in her five matches.

– Konta will make her top-five debut after Wimbledon. She will be only the fourth British woman to ever crack the top five.

– Konta is 8-2 against top-20 opponents in 2017.

– Konta had won just one match at Wimbledon prior to this fortnight.

Garbine Muguruza (ESP) [14] v Magdalena Rybarikova (SVK)

– Muguruza is 2-0 in Grand Slam semi-final matches.

– Of the four semi-finalists, Muguruza has dropped the fewest games (37) en route to the last-four stage.

– Muguruza hasn’t reached a final since she won the French Open 13 months ago.

– Muguruza will return to the top-10 after Wimbledon and could rise to No4 in the world if she wins the title.

– Rybarikova is on a 10-match winning streak, having won the title in Ilkley in the build-up to Wimbledon.

– Rybarikova missed seven months from last year’s Wimbledon, to February 2017, and had surgery on her left wrist and her right knee.

– Rybarikova’s ranking slipped to No453 last March. She’s guaranteed a return to the top-40 on Monday, and could crack the top-20 for the first time if she reaches the final.

– This is Rybarikova’s first Grand Slam semi-final in her 36th major appearance.

– At No87 in the world, Rybarikova is the fourth lowest-ranked woman to reach a Wimbledon semi-final.

– Rybarikova is the first Slovak to reach a Wimbledon semi-final.

– Rybarikova is 2-1 against top-20 players in 2017. Muguruza is 6-5.

– Prior to this fortnight, Rybarikova has never made it past the third round at any Grand Slam.

– Rybarikova has an 18-1 win-loss record on grass this season, including two ITF $100k titles.

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