Perisic and Trippier lead key battles ahead of Croatia v England at the World Cup

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Croatia and England are set to scrap for a spot in World Cup 2018’s final when they meet on Wednesday at Luzhniki Stadium.

Here are the key battles:

IVAN PERISIC V KIERAN TRIPPIER

It is fair to label Ivan Perisic’s output in Russia as disappointing.

The 29-year-old winger was a major catalyst for Internazionale’s charge towards Champions League qualification for the first time in six years, notching nine assists and 11 goals in 37 Serie A appearances during 2017/18.

This sensational form should have made him a key weapon in head coach Zlatko Dalic’s armoury. But he’s netted just once in five matches, the late winner against Iceland as Group D wrapped up, and provided zero assists.

Tellingly, he was hooked on 63 minutes in the quarter-final against hosts Russia with the score locked at 1-1.

The time to make his quality count is at hand.

A revelation of the World Cup operates on the right flank for England.

Kieran Trippier appears a lock-in for the team of the tournament after his influential performances at wing-back in head coach Gareth Southgate’s 3-5-2 formation. The Tottenham defender has set-up 13 chances in Russia – a figure only bettered by Croatia’s Luka Modric, Belgium’s Kevin De Bruyne and Brazil’s Neymar.

Only one assist has been officially registered, but his set-piece delivery from the right has led to a number of opportunities.

All this has come without Trippier neglecting his defensive duties. For both tackles (3/2.2) and interceptions (1.5/0.7), his average per game is better at the World Cup than it was in the Premier League during 2017/18.

10 07 key battles Croatia v England 1

LUKA MODRIC V JESSE LINGARD

Luka Modric’ superstar status has been bolstered by his run-outs in Russia.

The Real Madrid centre midfielder, par excellence, has been the heartbeat of Croatia’s side. A tally of 14 chances created speaks to his influence, while goals have come against Nigeria and Argentina.

An issue has been his deployment by Dalic. He started the last-eight tie against Russia in a deep role, with this error soon being corrected.

Jesse Lingard acts as a poster boy for the Southgate era.

The boss championed Lingard’s cause when they were together in the England Under-21s – and this faith has been repaid with the seniors.

The 25-year-old links play between the midfield and attack, with an average pass accuracy of 93.4 per cent speaking of his efficiency. A repeat of his vision to pick out Dele Alli for England’s second against Sweden is a must.

10 07 key battles Croatia v England 2

MARIO MANDZUKIC V HARRY KANE

Mario Mandzukic’s selfless toil up to for Croatia doesn’t go unnoticed.

Dalic labelled the Juventus centre forward as the “soul of the team” ahead of their last-16 clash with Denmark – and it is hard to disagree. The game against ‘Danish Dynamite’ saw his only goal in Russia, but an assist followed for Ante Rebic against Russia.

Such industry does come at a price, however. The 32-year-old laboured through the final stages against the hosts and his endurance will be tested against England.

Harry Kane drew a first blank of the tournament against Sweden.

The Tottenham superstar never looked close to adding to his six-goal tally, with only one off-target attempt on goal being registered. His 19 passes and 34 touches were also the lowest of any English starter.

A greater influence must be imprinted on this last-four clash. England need their outstanding player to rise to the occasion of a first semi-final in 28 years.

10 07 key battles Croatia v England 3

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Enzo Scifo and Antoine Griezmann head past and present matchups for France v Belgium

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The semi-finalists at World Cup 2018 feel the hand of history.

For all the global superstars France churn out with enviable frequency, it is 12 years since they made it this far. The vast majority of Belgium’s ‘Golden Generation’, who will feature on Tuesday against Les Bleus at Saint Petersburg Stadium, weren’t even born when 1986’s vintage were downed by a Diego Maradona-inspired Argentina.

Here, we compare how the current competitors match up to their compatriots who last reached the World Cup semi-finals:

FRANCE

Goalkeeper: A cigarette-smoking, eccentric free spirit and 1998 World Cup winner offers a veritable contrast to the man currently between the sticks for Les Bleus.

Fabian Barthez boasted remarkable athleticism despite his small stature for a goalkeeper, but was on the decline by the time 2006 came around. The then 34-year-old kept four clean sheets in Germany, though he critically could not repel any of Italy’s penalties in the final.

Hugo Lloris showed atypical frailty last season for France and Tottenham. Yet the Les Bleus skipper reinforced his quality with the save of the tournament from Uruguay full-back Martin Caceres’ header in the quarter-finals.

2006 rating: 6/10

2018 rating: 8/10

(FILES) Picture taken 09 July 2006 of Fr

Defence: In 2006, France boasted one of the planet’s best rearguards.

Bayern Munich’s ultra-reliable Willy Sagnol had usurped Lilian Thuram at right-back, with the legendary 1998 winner moving inside. Fellow centre-back William Gallas was at the height of his powers and an emerging Eric Abidal was a year away from moving to Barcelona.

Contemporary Barca centre-back Samuel Umtiti and Real Madrid’s Raphael Varane have played a key role from centre-back in securing three clean sheets from five matches in Russia.

At full-back, issues emerge. Benjamin Pavard is shoehorned in on the right and Lucas Hernandez erratic on the left.

2006 rating: 9/10

2018 rating: 7/10

FBL-WC-2018-MATCH57-URU-FRA

Midfield: One of football’s great figures experienced an iconic – and incendiary – send-off in Germany.

Madrid playmaker Zinedine Zidane turned back the clock to eliminate holders Brazil in the quarter-finals, chipped in a penalty during the final versus Italy and then head-butted Marco Materazzi for a violent last act on a football pitch. Patrick Vieira and Claude Makelele provided unmatched back up.

Head coach Didier Deschamps appears to have finally pulled off a balancing act in the middle of the park. Chelsea defensive midfielder N’Golo Kante is heir apparent to Makelele.

Manchester United’s Paul Pogba has blossomed thanks to the utilisation of a midfield marker, usually Blaise Matuidi. Pogba’s surges from deep and superb passing range are key facets.

2006 rating: 8/10

2018 rating: 8/10

FBL-WC2006-MATCH64-ITA-FRA-CARD

Attack: Deschamps has at his disposal an attack of rare depth and quality. Whether he gets the optimum out of them is up for debate.

Antoine Griezmann has three goals, but only performed anywhere near his best against Uruguay. Centre forward Olivier Giroud has not registered an attempt on target, although the head coach cherishes his hold-up play.

Teenager Kylian Mbappe put in a revelatory display against Argentina and has been a consistent outlet.

In 2006, Thierry Henry was one of the sport’s most-feared strikers at Arsenal and grew into the tournament with three goals. Wingers Florent Malouda and Franck Ribery were on the way to establishing themselves in the international arena.

2006 rating: 8/10

2018 rating: 7/10

TOPSHOT-FBL-WC-2018-MATCH50-FRA-ARG

OVERALL

2006 rating: 31/40

2018 rating: 30/40

BELGIUM

Goalkeeper: A maverick figure acted as last line of defence for Belgium at Mexico ’86.

Bayern Munich’s Jean-Marie Pfaff is still revered for his achievements in that tournament, ending Spain’s ambitions during a last-eight penalty shootout. His tremendous spring and vibrant personality earned him a spot in the FIFA 100 list of the greatest living players in 2004.

Current incumbent Thibaut Courtois is built of different stuff. The confident 26-year-old stands half-a-foot taller and this elongated frame is key to his goalkeeping.

Against Brazil in the quarter-finals, Courtois followed in Pfaff’s footsteps. The Chelsea player made nine saves and restricted the pre-tournament favourites to just one goal.

1986 rating: 8/10

2018 rating: 8/10

Belgian goalkeeper Jean Marie Pfaff (L)

Defence: Sound foundations did not underpin Belgium’s 1986 achievements.

The likes of Eric Gerets (Lion of Flanders) and Michel Renquin were part of a porous backline that conceded 15 times in seven matches, along the way to finishing fourth. In the second round alone, Soviet Union’s Igor Belanov notched a hat-trick.

A mixed view can be taken of this year’s side. Roberto Martinez’s 3-4-2-1 formation has left huge spaces to be exploited out wide, but Paris Saint-Germain right wing-back Thomas Meunier has come up with vital assists.

Even a return to a four-man defence against Brazil last time out still led to many chances being ceded. But defenders of real quality are possessed in Toby Alderweireld, Jan Vertonghen and Vincent Kompany.

1986 rating: 5/10

2018 rating: 7/10

FBL-WC-2018-MATCH58-BRA-BEL

Midfield: Pillars of strength are found in Belgium’s engine room.

Axel Witsel and Marouane Fellaini grew up together at Standard Liege, before heading their separate ways.

Fellaini has been decisive in the knockouts. He came off the bench to head Belgium level in the comeback win against Japan and then carried out an adroit nullifying job on Brazil’s Neymar.

The extraordinary Jan Ceulemans was the heartbeat of the 1986 side, his displays putting him in the team of the tournament. An emerging Enzo Scifo, who at 20-years old would go on to win the tournament’s Best Young Player Award, provided able support.

1986 rating: 8/10

2018 rating: 7/10

FIFA WORLD CUP 1986-SOVIET UNION VS BELGIUM

Attack: It doesn’t get much better than Belgium’s existing attack.

Pushed forward from centre midfield versus Brazil, Manchester City’s incomparable Kevin De Bruyne struck the decisive second. Fellow supreme playmaker Eden Hazard has two assists and goals in Russia.

Up top, United’s Romelu Lukaku is in a fight with England’s Harry Kane for the Golden Boot. His storming assists versus Brazil showed a different aspect of his game.

Less glitter surrounded Belgium’s 1986 attack, but there was no lack of quality. Franky Vercauteren on the left wing was nicknamed ‘The Little Prince’ and striker Nico Claesen struck three times.

1986 rating: 7/10

2018 rating: 9/10

FBL-WC-2018-MATCH58-BRA-BEL

OVERALL

1986 rating: 28/40

2018 rating: 31/40

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Gareth Southgate has given England the great gift of turning despair into belief

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Room to believe: Gareth Southgate.

Dumbs Gone to Iceland, Ice Wallies, Cod Help Us, England’s Greatest Humiliation, England’s Darkest Day.

Whether Gareth Southgate’s charges now return from Russia with the World Cup or not, they’ve already achieved the impossible.

It is only two summers since newspapers – august or downmarket, broadsheet and tabloid – agonisingly detailed the national game’s nadir. Sunday’s front pages were full of contrasting cheer and bombast about an ascension to the semi-finals that resided only in hope, rather than expectation, three weeks ago.

For the first time since a special sun-kissed spell in Italy 28 years ago, the globe’s grandest competition has not elicited wild recrimination from the fourth estate. This is what a 2-0 triumph against Sweden can do for the mood.

England supporters have been conditioned, by failure after futile failure, to expect nothing but disappointment.

They are also meant to suffer heart-wrenching sorrow from penalty shootouts. Chris Waddle and Stuart Pearce in 1990, David Batty in 1998, Steven Gerrard in 2006.

That onerous weight was lifted against Colombia last week.

Confounding rock-bottom expectation is head coach Southgate’s great gift.

A ‘Golden Generation’ has come and gone, leaving nothing but unfulfilled potential in their wake.

The last occasion when English heads were held this high was Euro 1996. Halcyon days when football was first “coming home”.

Southgate – the fall guy from the shootout then against Germany that killed hopes of cherished success on home soil – has shown leadership and dignity in a period when political figures wallow in the swamp that British discourse has descended into.

Hard or soft Brexit, cast to one side as a fractured populace unites under one banner.

Ruptures caused at Euro 2016 should have taken several generations to heal.

England’s misadventure ended with debutants Iceland – the smallest nation to ever qualify – rebounding from Wayne Rooney’s fourth-minute penalty to inflict a 2-1 defeat during the round of 16.

This wrenched out the stitches applied to wounds caused by the caustic failure at World Cup 2014.

Both humiliations were endured under Roy Hodgson.

Shame that was added to when initial replacement Sam Allardyce’s position was rendered untenable in September 2016 after one qualifying triumph.

This followed allegations of impropriety about getting around Football Association bans on third-party ownership of players.

To now be one win away from a first World Cup final since 1966, two wins away from following in the lionised footsteps of Sir Bobby Charlton and Co., seemed an impossible prospect on that inexcusable day against Iceland at Allianz Riviera.

This isn’t a perfect picture. And Southgate doesn’t pertain to paint one.

Rewind back to Italia ’90 and England’s progression to the last-four was not plain sailing, either.

Stultifying draws against Republic of Ireland and the Netherlands was followed by a tense 1-0 win against Egypt to advance from Group F.

From there, extra-time was needed to see off Belgium. Cameroon then came from behind to move within eight minutes of progression to the semis at their expense.

In comparison, England’s contemporary run has been more mundane.

Enlivening victories, late and heavy, were handed out to minnows Tunisia and Panama.

The luxury of resting stars versus Belgium was afforded as Group G wound down in a game that both probably wanted to lose. Legitimate claims were made to being the better side against Colombia and Sweden in the knockouts.

Sir Bobby Robson, Gary Lineker and Paul Gascoigne. Names who were written into England’s lore the last time they reached this rarified stage.

Southgate, Harry Kane and Harry Maguire have already matched this legacy.

The challenge is to secure betterment, beginning with Wednesday’s date with destiny against Croatia at Luzhniki Stadium.

A country, until this ethereal month rendered weary by decades of  underachievement, now expects.

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