Wimbledon: Stefan Edberg, Bradley Cooper, Duchess of Cambridge - Best photos from Federer-Cilic final

Sport360 staff 16/07/2017

Roger Federer won a record eighth Wimbledon title and became the tournament's oldest champion Sunday with a straight-sets victory over injury-hit Marin Cilic, who dramatically broke down in tears midway through the final.

Federer claimed his 19th Grand Slam title 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 and at 35 is Wimbledon's oldest men's winner of the modern era, succeeding Arthur Ashe, who was almost 32 when he won in 1976.

However, the Swiss superstar's 11th Wimbledon final, and 29th at the majors, will also be remembered for the moving sight of the popular Cilic breaking down in tears after slipping 3-0 behind in the second set.

Most popular

Wimbledon: Roger Federer sweeps past Marin Cilic to become first man in history to win eight Wimbledon titles

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
Unstoppable: Roger Federer.

Roger Federer became the first man in history to win eight Wimbledon singles titles after he posted a routine 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 victory over the seventh-seeded Marin Cilic on Sunday.

The Swiss also claimed a 19th Grand Slam trophy – the most ever won by a man and fourth-most in history among men and women – and he did without dropping a set throughout the fortnight in south-west London.

At 35 years and 342 days, Federer also became the oldest man in the Open Era to claim a Wimbledon singles trophy. It’s his second major success of the season, and he now has a tour-leading five titles in 2017.

The Swiss broke into tears following his victory, overcome by emotions while sat at his bench, as he realised what he had just accomplished.

“Gotta take more time off, I don’t know what’s going on. Maybe I’ll go away for another six months,” joked Federer, who had a six-month hiatus last year to get over niggling injuries and returned to win two Slams this season.

“It feels great, it means the world to me, we worked so hard last year. Holding the trophy now, not dropping a set, I can’t believe it yet. It’s too much really.

“I kept on believing and dreaming and here I am today with the eighth, it’s fantastic.

“I hope this wasn’t my last match and I hope I can come back next year to try to defend the title.”

Federer’s whole family was in his box, including his four children.

“They have no clue what’s going on, they probably think this is a nice playground. I hope one day they’ll understand,” he said of his younger twins, Leo and Lenny.

Centre Court was the place to be on Sunday afternoon with tennis legends, Hollywood stars, politicians and royals all in attendance.

Both players made nervy starts on serve but held, with Cilic showing early signs of those mighty groundstrokes that earned him 336 winners heading into the final.

The first break point of the contest was for Cilic in game four but a Federer serve made it go away and the Swiss held for 2-2.

A moment of Federer magic saw the Swiss flick a round-the-post drop shot from a tough position and seconds later he had triple-break point.

The flick that helped Federer break.

The flick that helped Federer break.

Cilic saved the first two with good serves but he got broken on the third, as Federer attacked with his famous backhand to inch ahead 3-2. The No3 seed easily consolidated for 4-2.

A ridiculous exchange that featured powerful backhands from Federer and quick reflexes from Cilic at the net gave the 35-year-old his first set point in game nine. Cilic saved it with his serve but he lost the set soon after on a double fault as Federer took the lead in 36 minutes.

A wide Cilic backhand gave Federer the break early in the second set and he quickly opened up a 3-0 advantage.

Emotional: Cilic.

Emotional: Cilic.

Cilic broke down in tears during the changeover and had the trainer come out but didn’t get a medical timeout. He held on the restart for 3-6, 1-3. Federer went up a double-break on a long Cilic volley and went up two-sets-to-love inside 61 minutes.

Cilic got a medical timeout after the second set, took pills from the trainer and received treatment on a taped left foot.

The Croat saved a break point to hold for 2-1 in the third but Federer got the break he needed in the seventh game and nothing could stop him from making more history.

“That’s what I did throughout my whole career, I never gave up during a match, and that’s what I did today,” said Cilic. “I had an amazing journey here, played the tennis of my life. I really want to thank my team, they gave so much strength to me.”

Federer consoled Cilic and said: “It is cruel sometimes but he fought well and he’s a hero, so congratulations on a wonderful tournament, Marin. You should be really proud, this is such a special occasion to be in the finals. I hope we can play down the road some better ones. So well done.”

Most popular

Related Tags

Wimbledon: Garbine Muguruza hoping to find consistency after her second Grand Slam triumph

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • Mail
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • G+
  • WhatsApp
  • Pinterest
  • LinkedIn

Garbine Muguruza walked away from Roland Garros last month in tears but six weeks later, she strutted off Wimbledon Centre Court a crowned champion.

Muguruza cried during her post-defeat press conference in Paris, almost like she was releasing all the built-up tension she felt throughout the 12 months in which she was the French Open title holder.

She left the interview room at Roland Garros to collect herself after erupting in tears, and returned with a defiant look on her face, ready to look forward. It’s almost like she knew she’d win a second Grand Slam a few weeks later.

“It was an emotional moment. I read a lot of headlines saying ‘Garbine breaks down’ and stuff like that and I’m like ‘I’m not breaking down’, it’s just something human,” Muguruza explained following her Wimbledon triumph on Sunday.
“I felt pressure out there and I lost, I felt that I did a good tournament even though I didn’t reach that far. But I was like ‘I’m going to learn from this’, just turn the page, I have a whole grass-court season coming, I feel good, forget about the French Open, next year I’m going to go out there and try to do it better.”


She certainly did turn the page.
The Venezuela-born Spaniard was a force of nature during the fortnight at Wimbledon, and one thing that stood out the most is that she never panicked, even when she was down.
She rallied back from a set down to defeat top-seeded Angelique Kerber in the fourth round. Against Venus Williams in the final, she saved two set points in the 10th game – one with a brutal long rally – then held and never lost another game.


“It seems like a lot of things should go through my mind (on those set points), right? But in fact I was like, ‘I was expecting that, I was ready to face difficult situations’. I was ready to be 5-1 up, 5-1 down, set points, because I had Venus in front of me and I know she’s a good player. I was not worried. I’m like, if I lose this set I have two more, but if I stick here I might turn it around and that’s what I did, just played the ball,” said the 23-year-old.
It’s no secret that Muguruza struggles with consistency, particularly after pulling off a big achievement. Her form dropped off after reaching her first Wimbledon final in 2015, and a similar dip took place after she won the 2016 French Open.
Does she feel she is now better equipped to avoid such a scenario?
“I would like to. People think that when you win it’s so easy, and it’s not easy also to handle it and probably I expect myself to play always so good and when it doesn’t happen it’s hard to deal with,” she admits.
“But I think the best way is to be humble, go back to the court, start even in the hard court season now and keep working and things will come. But not thinking that I’m going to play incredible every tournament.”
Does it get harder to love the sport when she is struggling to put together wins on the regular tour?
“I think a lot of people have this love-hate relation (with tennis) because it’s hard in the defeat, it’s very nice when you win, so it’s a combination and I also felt like that. When you win everything is beautiful, when you lose everything is darker, you’ve got to turn things around so it’s hard,” she says.
Muguruza has stated several times her admiration for Serena Williams – the winner of 23 Grand Slam titles. Serena dominated the sport for the past several years and plans on returning next year after she delivers her baby. Does Muguruza other dream about dominating the tour the way Serena did, rather than just up her level for the Slams?
“I don’t think anyone is going to dominate so long and so much like Serena, because it’s incredible. But I just want to go out there in the Grand Slams, the tournaments, and perform well, hopefully win the trophy. It’s simple but that’s my goal and that’s how I see it for now,” she replied.


Most popular

Related Tags