Asiad official slams BCCI for treating cricket ‘like business’

Barny 4/10/2014
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Sheikh Ahmad

Olympic Council of Asia president Sheikh Ahmad lashed out on the Board of Control of Cricket in India for not sending a cricket team at the Incheon Asian Games.









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Clarke is relieved to have ditched selector’s role

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Focused: MIchael Clarke.

Australia captain Michael Clarke has revealed that he is enjoying his captaincy after giving up his selec­tion duties last year.

Even though he criticised the team selection against Zimbabwe during the Tri-series in August, which the Aussies lost, Clarke feels keeping the captain out of selection matters is the way forward.

“It (not being a selector) has definitely helped. It has allowed me more time to focus on the team. It’s a full time job being a selector and I didn’t think I could do that to the best of my ability and be captain,” Clarke told Sport360°.

“For me, that’s the way forward. I am not comfortable being a se­lector. I have a great relationship with Darren Lehmann (coach) and Rod Marsh (national selector) has known me since I was 16.

“We have good people in those positions. Over the last 10 years, I have disagreed with selectors but the papers didn’t write about it, this time (after the match against Zim­babwe) they did,” said Clarke, who was at the Park Hyatt in Dubai to interact with members of the Hyatt Gold Passport programme and his sponsors Qantas airlines.

The 33-year-old is currently bid­ing his time to get fit by the first Test against Pakistan starting in Dubai on October 22. He aggravat­ed his hamstring injury while bat­ting against Zimbabwe in the Tri-series but he doesn’t regret pushing his body, even though the World Cup is not too far away.

“I have pushed my body to the limits every time and it has taken me to where I am now. I have al­ways wanted to play for my country. Any opportunity I get to be on the field, I am going to do that.”

Even though preparations for the 2015 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand have begun, Clarke said the focus of the team was on winning the series against Paki­stan, starting with the one-off T20 tomorrow.

“We are looking to win this series. We are not looking to gain or learn anything for the World Cup. It is going to be a tough series so we are focused and we are look­ing at right here, right now,” he said.

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Strauss fears for the future of Tests

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Worries: Andrew Strauss

Former England captain Andrew Strauss has issued a dire warning for the future of Test cricket, saying he fears it could “fizzle out”.

Strauss made his gloomy fore­cast in the paperback edition of his autobiography, Driving Ambition, published Thursday.

In it the former opening batsman, who led England to Ashes victory in both 2009 and again in 2010/11 in Australia, highlighted the revamp of the International Cricket Coun­cil – on whose cricket committee he now sits – and the rise of lucrative Twenty20 tournaments such as the Indian Premier League as the big­gest threats to Test matches.

Cricket’s three wealthiest na­tions – India, England and Aus­tralia – now effectively run the ICC, cricket’s global governing body, between them.

Should a new tel­evision rights deal be concluded, the trio and in particular India – al­ready the richest of the three crick­et boards on account of the massive commercial marketplace generated by the huge following for the sport in the world’s second-most popu­lous country – will become even wealthier.

Strauss believes this will cre­ate an increasing number of lop­sided matches, in turn speeding the demise of Test cricket.

“India can argue that they bring the most money into the game, and thus de­serve more out of the precious ICC broadcasting rights, but skewing the distribution of the three boards that are already the most financial­ly secure can only create a situation in which the rich get richer and the poor poorer,” Strauss wrote.

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