Grigor Dimitrov: I never had a good relationship with the French Open

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For a player who has the talent and the game that is suited to every surface, Grigor Dimitrov has bizarrely never done well at the French Open.

The Bulgarian, who will be seeded No. 4 in next week’s Roland Garros, has lost in the first round in Paris four times in seven appearances and his record there is his worst of all the Grand Slams.

It’s the only major where Dimitrov has never reached the second week and his winning record there is a poor 42 per cent (5-7 win-loss).

Last year, Dimitrov matched his best showing at the French Open by reaching the third round before losing to eventual quarter-finalist Pablo Carreno Busta.


The 27-year-old Dimitrov, who is the reigning ATP Finals champion, has claimed eight career titles so far – one of which has come on clay in Bucharest.








His season on the red dirt in 2018 saw him make the semis in Monte Carlo, quarters in Barcelona, before making opening round exits in Madrid and Rome.


A former semi-finalist at both Wimbledon and the Australian Open, Dimitrov is hoping he can finally turn things around at Roland Garros this year.


“Yes that would be great, of course. I always want to do better than the year before in every tournament that I play,” Dimitrov said in Madrid this month.


“I know the French has never been… we never had a good relationship I thought so far but I think with the time now that has passed, I kind of started the season pretty well, on the clay, so I just want to keep on playing that way, keep on winning matches on the clay and of course when that time comes around I hope I can do better. It’s as simple as that. The rest, I want to control what I can control and if the rest doesn’t happen, then hopefully there’s another time for that.”



Dimitrov made huge progress last year, winning his first Masters 1000 title in Cincinnati before capping his career-best season by lifting the ATP Finals trophy in London.


He has formed a strong team with his coach Dani Vallverdu and while the Monaco-resident doesn’t have a clear explanation for his mediocre history at the French Open, he’s not spending too much time analysing the reasons behind it.


“There’s no point to go that deep into your thoughts – for sure it’s a big event but I don’t want to get too technical because there’s really no need,” said the fifth-ranked Dimitrov when asked about why he’s never done well in Paris.


“You prepare yourself, you get out on the court, give 100 per cent of yourself and see what happens. And I think in the previous years I wasn’t able to convert any of that time that I was there, and it’s just as simple as that. Why? I wish I could give you more answers for that. In that particular situation, I don’t want to over-think it. Every year and every tournament that I enter I’m very excited, very positive and I think you need to put a lot of that into every event that you play.


“You might have tough rounds, you might lose early, it sucks for sure, but at the end of the day you play tennis and the best thing in tennis is also that you always have a next week.”


The French Open main draw action begins on Sunday May 27. Qualifying action commenced on Monday and Tuesday’s matches saw Egypt’s Mohamed Safwat advance to the second round 6-4, 6-7 (2), 6-4 over Slovenian Blaz Rola.


Former semi-finalist Ernests Gulbis also won his qualifying opener, 7-5, 6-4 over 38-year-old Frenchman Stephane Robert.



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Svitolina shoots into Roland Garros contention, Sharapova finds her inner grit - Things learned from Rome and Madrid

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Deja vu: Svitolina beat Halep in the Rome final for a 2nd year in a row.

As the Premier-level Madrid-Rome double-header wraps up, the countdown for Roland Garros officially begins.

Elina Svitolina successfully defended her title at the Foro Italico in Rome on Sunday, easing past world No. 1 Simona Halep, a week after Petra Kvitova lifted the trophy at the Caja Magica in Madrid.

Both weeks in Spain and Italy were eventful and there were far too many revelations to ponder.

With the French Open less than a week away, here are 10 things we learned from the past two weeks of dirt action in Spain and Italy.

SVITOLINA’S A FINALS SPECIALIST

The Ukrainian once again heads to Roland Garros as one of the favourites having bagged a second Rome title in as many seasons.

Svitolina bageled Halep in Sunday’s final, and was ruthless in her delivery as she capped a week of victories over Petra Martic, Daria Kasatkina, Angelique Kerber and Anett Kontaveit with a straight-sets success over the reigning world No. 1.

Even more remarkable is Svitolina’s record in finals, which currently stands at 12-2. She has won her last eight consecutive finals and has now successfully defended a title for the third time in her career and second time this year.

The world No. 4 told reporters in Rome that a painful final defeat to Eugenie Bouchard in the 2012 Wimbledon junior tournament was a useful lesson that drove her to give her maximum in every title match she contested. It was an experience that continues to pay dividends six years later. Now can she go all the way in Paris?

Svitolina has never made it past the quarter-finals in a major but she is constantly improving. Last year’s inexplicable meltdown against Halep in the French Open quarter-finals that saw Svitolina lose from a set and 5-1 up against the Romanian was undoubtedly a painful experience. But considering how Svitolina has dealt with such mistakes in the past, last season’s Roland Garros could be just the lesson she needed to finally break through at a Grand Slam.

CAUSE FOR CONCERN FOR HALEP

Once again, Halep continues to perplex. Each time you feel the Romanian has taken strides forward, a hefty defeat comes along to pull her a few steps back. I still believe the Australian Open was a huge turning point for her as she showed the world how much fight she has in her.

But as many people have pointed out, between those courageous performances from Halep, there are also some pretty significant beatdowns she has taken.

Some would argue that that is the nature of a sport like tennis – you win some, you lose some, it’s a case of match-ups, the variables are too many to quantify and the women’s field is closely packed with too much talent on display within the world’s top-50.

But it’s worth noting that Halep has received either a bagel or a breadstick in seven different losses in the past nine months. Sometimes such lopsided defeats have been a result of injuries – another normal side of any sport that just seems to strike Halep a little too often.

Will this Rome final loss to Svitolina, for a second year in a row, dent Halep’s French Open chances? It didn’t really affect the Romanian last season, where she went on to make the final in Paris, before she was stunned by an on-fire Jelena Ostapenko.

Still I will leave you with this stat: Halep has lost six of her last seven finals.

As Svitolina has been showing a knack of turning the screw each time she reaches a final, it seems that Halep is developing a habit of lifting her foot off the gas pedal when she’s at that stage.

MARIA RISES IN ROME

Quarter-finals in Madrid and semi-finals in Rome mean that Maria Sharapova gets to return to the top-30 for the first time since she came back from her doping ban 13 months ago and she’s also snagged a seeding spot in the Roland Garros main draw.

Same time last year, Sharapova walked away from Rome injured and was denied a wildcard for the French Open.

It’s now 12 months later and the Russian five-time Grand Slam champion seems to be in a far better place.

In Madrid, she made her first Premier Mandatory quarter-final in three years before losing to Kiki Bertens while in Rome, she was at her grinding best, battling through three-setters against Ashleigh Barty, Dominika Cibulkova and Ostapenko before falling to Halep in three.

A gritty Sharapova is always the most dangerous version of the 31-year-old.

MAKE WAY FOR THE TALL BIG-HITTERS

We’ve seen powerful players enjoy more and more success on clay in recent months, even ones who are over 180cm tall and aren’t necessarily natural movers on the surface. Karolina Pliskova won nine clay matches in a row, taking the Stuttgart title before reaching the semis in Madrid while Petra Kvitova is on an 11-match winning streak on the red dirt with trophies clinched in Prague and Madrid.

Pliskova made semis last year at Roland Garros, while an all-out attacking Ostapenko became a Grand Slam champion there a couple of days later.

If the last few weeks on clay are anything to go by, don’t exclude the power-hitters from your list of French Open contenders!

AWESOME ANETT

Ranked a career-high No. 25, Kontaveit heads to Roland Garros with a 10-3 win-loss record on clay over the past six weeks. She’s made semis in Stuttgart and Rome, with her list of scalps in the latter looking like this: Coco Vandeweghe, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Venus Williams, Caroline Wozniacki. Seeded and in-form, Kontaveit is a player many will want to avoid in Paris.

QUESTION MARKS AROUND MUGURUZA

For a second time this season, Garbine Muguruza lost a clash after holding match points. She did it in her defeat to Daria Kasatkina in Dubai last February, and it happened again in her loss to Daria Gavrilova in Rome last week. Muguruza squandered a 4-0 lead in the deciding set of her Rome opener against Gavrilova and is now 2-3 since she won the title in Monterrey early last month.

You’ve got to wonder why the Spanish two-time Grand Slam champion keeps switching off like that?

PROGRESS FOR PENKO

Ostapenko’s three-set defeat to Sharapova in the Rome quarters is arguably the match of the tournament. And while her clay season so far has been patchy (QF in Stuttgart, R1 in Madrid, QF in Rome), the reigning French Open champion feels her runner-up showing in Miami helped her regain her confidence and she’ll obviously be a threat in Paris.

BERTENS AND MERTENS

A title win on green clay in Charleston and a runner-up showing in Madrid (beat Wozniacki, Sharapova, Caroline Garcia) make Dutchwoman Kiki Bertens a genuine contender at Roland Garros. Meanwhile, Belgium’s Elise Mertens has a clay season that consists of 13 consecutive match wins that included title runs in Lugano and Rabat. She had to pull out of Rome with an illness but if she’s healthy in Paris, we can expect another strong showing from the Australian Open semi-finalist.

SAKKARI STEPS UP

Greece’s Maria Sakkari is having a memorable clay campaign, reaching semis in Istanbul and ousting Bertens and Karolina Pliskova in Rome en route to the last-16. Her reward is a place in the world’s top-40 for the first time in her career. The Spartan warrior could be a dark horse in Paris.

ALL ROADS LEAD TO GELATO

Before she handed Halep a walkover in the Rome third round due to a rib injury, Madison Keys claimed two solid wins over Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and Donna Vekic.

The world No. 13, who is a former Rome finalist, recently split with one of her coaches, Dieter Kindlmann, due to a breakdown in their communication. Keys was flying solo in Rome, and said she was getting scouting advice and tips from her boyfriend, ATP player Bjorn Fratangelo.

While her relationship with clay continues to be complicated, Keys did come up with one of my favourite lines in Rome, when discussing how she feels about the city and the tournament.

“It kind of helps in the sense of it’s like you have a good day, you go get gelato, you have a bad day, you go get gelato. At the end of the day you’re going to have gelato,” laughed the American.

Indeed, all roads lead to gelato!

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Rafael Nadal overcomes Novak Djokovic to reach Rome final - Takeaways from their 51st meeting

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Rafael Nadal rekindled his rivalry with Novak Djokovic in Rome on Saturday, defeating the Serb 7-6 (4), 6-3 to reach a 10th career final in the Italian capital.

The Spaniard hadn’t faced off with Djokovic since he beat him en route to the Madrid title 12 months ago and their one-hour 56-minute showdown was a high-intensity affair throughout.

Nadal will reclaim the No. 1 ranking if he wins the final on Sunday. Otherwise, Federer will hold onto the top spot until at least June 24.

The Mallorcan faces either Marin Cilic or defending champion Alexander Zverev in the final.

Here are some of the main takeaways from Saturday’s 51st meeting between Nadal and Djokovic.

PROGRESS FOR DJOKOVIC

Djokovic has shown great progress this week in Rome, battling through tough situations, and slowly finding his inner warrior. His shot-making against Nadal was reminiscent of vintage Djokovic, at times, as he found his angles and showed the kind of all-court game that troubled his rivals for a decade.

Still at the most crucial moments, it was Nadal who had the upper hand, which is understandable considering Djokovic hasn’t competed at this level often in recent months.

The question remains whether Djokovic has indeed turned a corner or if this is just a good week that could be followed by not so good ones. Last year, he made the final in Rome, defeating Juan Martin del Potro and Dominic Thiem en route, and won the Eastbourne title a month later but still Djokovic wasn’t able to shake his doubts.

The most promising sign this time though, is how Djokovic pushed Nadal in some of those rallies, and how tight that opening set was. Djokovic finished the match with a +6 winners:unforced errors differential (26 winners, 20 unforced errors), compared to Nadal’s 22:14, landed 71 per cent of his first serves in and won 60 per cent of the points on his first serve, 61 per cent of those on his second.

PERFECT IN SEMIS

Nadal took his record in Rome semi-finals to 10-0, and will be gunning for an eighth title at the Foro Italico on Sunday.

FORM GOING UP, RANKING GOING DOWN

He may have a had a promising tournament, but Djokovic’s semi-final defeat to Nadal means he will drop out of the top-20 on Monday, which would be his lowest ranking since October 2006. Since he was unable to defend his runner-up points from Rome last year, Djokovic lost points in the Italian capital this week.

The Serb will have a low seeding at Roland Garros and all eyes will be on him to see where he lands in the draw (taking place on Thursday May 24) in Paris.

MASTER OF MASTERS

Nadal took sole ownership of the top spot on the leaderboard for most Masters 1000 match wins, pulling one match ahead of Roger Federer to record a 356th victory at that level (against 77 losses).

CLOSING THE GAP

Nadal narrowed Djokovic’s head-to-head advantage over him to improve his record against the Serb to 25-26. After beginning his rivalry 14-4 against Djokovic, Nadal has lost 11 of his last 14 matches against him.

THE LONG EXCHANGES

There were some signature Nadal-Djokovic rallies in Saturday’s semi-final but one stat that stands out is the fact that Nadal won 14 of the 20 rallies that had nine or more shots.

ANGRY DJOKOVIC IS A GOOD SIGN

Perhaps the most telling part of Saturday’s match was when Djokovic was yelling towards his box in frustration over losing that first-set tiebreak. When they switched ends at 3-all, Djokovic found himself having to deal with Nadal’s high topspin balls while standing against the direction of wind and his struggle to handle those balls brought out the rage inside of him.

It’s been a long time since we’ve seen Djokovic this engaged and fired up and it’s the most promising sign yet that better things are just around the corner for the ex-world No. 1.

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