Serena Williams advances, Venus falls, Roger Federer sets grass record - Wimbledon day five highlights

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Serena and Venus Williams had different fortunes in their respective third rounds at Wimbledon on Friday as the former defeated Kristina Mladenovic 7-5, 7-6 (2) to advance to the last-16, but the latter fell to Dutchwoman Kiki Bertens 6-2, 6-7 (5), 8-6.

It was Bertens’ first-ever top-10 win on a non-clay court and it put the No. 20 seed in the fourth round at the All England Club for the first time in her career.

Roger Federer defeated Germany’s Jan-Lennard Struff 6-3, 7-5, 6-2 to post a 175th career victory on grass, an all-time record by any man, moving one ahead of Jimmy Connors.

10th-seeded Madison Keys suffered a shock upset against Evgeniya Rodina 7-5, 5-7, 6-4, but No. 7 seed Karolina Pliskova escaped a similar fate by defeat Mihaela Buzarnescu 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1.


Gael Monfils reached the fourth round at Wimbledon for the first time in his 10 career appearances by defeating last year’s semi-finalist, No. 11 seed Sam Querrey 5-7, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2.








On his decade-long quest for a Wimbledon second-week showing, Monfils said: “It was for sure long. But I think it took me years and years. Also had to put myself in a good opportunity, to put myself in a good balance with my body and my believe on a grass court. Then, as I say, the last three years were much better. I just couldn’t I think take the opportunity. Today I took it and I’m happy about it.”



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Nick Kyrgios, Rafael Nadal, Johanna Konta get chatty with the umpires - Wimbledon diary

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Players have conversations with umpires all the time, and those exchanges often make matches all the more exciting — they show us the raw emotions of the competitors in the thick of the action, and sometimes take a comical turn that exhibits a funnier side to them.

On Thursday, Nick Kyrgios and chair umpire James Keothavong had an unusual exchange.

A foot-fault was called against Kyrgios during his win over Robin Haase and the Australian disputed the call.

“What? After I hit it? How’s that possible?” asked the No. 15 seed.

“That’s what he has to do, he can’t call it before you hit,” replied a deadpan Keothavong.

Kyrgios, along with the crowd, all chuckled at the response.

Later, Keothavong actually climbed down from his chair, and started showing Kyrgios how he can avoid foot-faulting.

“He told me at any point if your foot crosses the line, it’s a foot fault. I just got too close to the T,” explained Kyrgios later.

And here I thought on-court coaching wasn’t allowed in tennis!

FEISTY DOMI

During her second round match against Dominika Cibulkova, home favourite Johanna Konta had a different kind of complaint.

Cibulkova is known to be one of the fieriest competitors on tour and it seems the way she was pumping herself up was annoying Konta.

“It was actually to do with the way she plays, she’s very intense. She was slapping her thigh. It was like a clapping. I just asked the umpire if it would be the same — is it the same if someone else from externally in the crowd would clap in between first and second serves? That was more what was bothering me,” said Konta after her loss.

“The umpire had a word with her and she stopped. She doesn’t do it in a malicious way. She does it to pump herself up. It was nothing more than that.”

A MATTER OF TIME

Rafael Nadal has a complicated relationship with some chair umpires because he takes too long between points and he sometimes doesn’t like the moment umpires choose to give him time violation warnings.

On Thursday, the world No. 1 received two time violations, one before the match had even started, and one before the third set. The Spaniard has a history with the chair umpire Carlos Bernardes, who was officiating his match against Mikhail Kukushkin, and for a period, the Brazilian was not working on any of Nadal’s matches.

Nadal didn’t even realise he received that first time violation before the start of his second round on Thursday.

“Before the match I had?” he asked reporters in his press conference.

“I received two time violations? First news about that.

“I don’t know. But being honest, with the five minutes, that’s because we have five minutes and one minute. I don’t see a watch here. I don’t see that countdown. It’s more difficult for me to understand what’s going on. In Australia and Roland Garros, we have the watch here that we can manage to be under control with the watch. Here we can’t.”

The hilarious moment came when the press conference moderator, sat next to Nadal, looked to be rushing the Spaniard during a lengthy answer, ironically about time violations.

“One second,” a laughing Nadal told the moderator. “Because I feel the pressure that we go… We finished the match so I don’t need that [mimics a nudge]”

You really can’t make this stuff up!

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Garbine Muguruza and Marin Cilic suffer shock exits - Wimbledon day four highlights

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Last year’s women’s champion and men’s runner-up, Garbine Muguruza and Marin Cilic, both crashed out of the Wimbledon second round on Thursday.

Third-seeded Muguruza was stunned by Belgium’s world No. 47 Alison van Uytvanck 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 on Court No. 2, while men’s No. 3 seed Cilic lost 3-6, 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (3), 7-5 to Argentina’s Guido Pella, who had never won a match at Wimbledon prior to this week.

“I think she played big today. She took a lot of risk, and it worked for her. I also think that my level today was not where I wanted it to be. That’s also why she could develop that kind of level,” said Muguruza of Van Uytvanck, who had only ever won one match at Wimbledon before this tournament.

“But, yeah, is a little bit sad because I wanted to, you know, really go out there. But I think she played great. Think she played great.”


Cilic was in control of his second round against Pella when it started on Wednesday evening, going up two sets but play was suspended by rain, with the Croatian trailing 3-4 in the third set (a break) and the momentum completely shifted when play resumed on Thursday.








“Yesterday the match started so bad for me because he was playing so good, very solid from the baseline with big serves, and I couldn’t do almost nothing,” said the 28-year-old Pella, who is into the third round at a Grand Slam for the first time in his career.




“So the rain came, and today was very different day because I started to feel very good. Just at the beginning of the fourth set — I close the set in the third with big serves, with big two games. Then I started to feel better and better. I saw him playing like a little bit slower than the day before. So I tried to fight every ball, tried to be close in the score, and that’s it.”


Cilic, who was one of the top contenders for the title and won Queens in the build-up to Wimbledon, admits he wasn’t able to summon his best on court after the restart on Thursday.


“I was just not feeling as comfortable as yesterday with hitting. I was not as accurate. I was just missing some balls, some easy balls, giving him a chance to come back. That was playing the part. It was not just the pressure. It was me not executing on the court well,” said the world No. 5.


Watch video highlights above from a thrilling day four at Wimbledon.



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