Wimbledon: Jelena Jankovic reveals her hidden talent, favourite grass moment and more in her Rapid Fire Round

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Ex-world No1 Jelena Jankovic has a brutal Wimbledon first round against Agnieszka Radwanska on Tuesday.

Ahead of the action, Sport360 caught up with the charismatic Serbian at the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party to find out some quirky facts about her.

Who would she like to play her in a movie? What's her biggest fear and what would be her hidden talent?

The awesome 'JJ' tells all in this Rapid Fire Round.
Also watch her try to articulate what her relationship with grass has been like over the years in this video.



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Wimbledon: Stan Wawrinka stunned by world No49 Daniil Medvedev in first round

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Over and out: Stan Wawrinka.

Swiss fifth seed and French Open runner-up Stan Wawrinka was knocked out of Wimbledon in the first round by Russia’s Daniil Medvedev on Monday, losing 6-4, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1.

World No49 Medvedev, making his Wimbledon debut, goes on to face Belgian qualifier Ruben Bemelmans for a place in the last 32.

It was Wawrinka’s sixth first round loss at the All England Club, although his efforts were hampered by a left knee injury which required an ice pack at the changeovers.

It also meant that 33-year-old Wawrinka’s hopes of becoming just the sixth man to complete the career Grand Slam were ended for another year.

Having lost in the first round at Queen’s Club last month, Wawrinka’s grass-court campaign amounted to two matches and two defeats.

“I wasn’t feeling the way I wanted to feel. But play against a great player who I think was confident today, was playing well, was playing faster. Was a tough loss,” said Wawrinka, who had a chance of taking the world No1 ranking from Andy Murray this fortnight but needed to win the Wimbledon title to do so.

“For sure was a bad grass court two tournament for me. That’s clear. First one was not what I wanted. Unfortunately it’s like that. I had some problem with the knee since Queen’s, so was not the way I wanted to get ready for this tournament.

“Today was tough. I was expecting to feel a little bit better. When I play a player that level, it’s difficult to win. He went for it, was playing well, so it was a tough, tough day.”

For 21-year-old Medvedev, it was a first win at the Grand Slam level, coming on the back of an impressive grass court season.

He made the semi-finals in Eastbourne last week where it took Novak Djokovic to stop him, as well as the quarter-finals at ‘s-Hertogenbosch and Queen’s.

“A year ago I was ranked 250. If someone told me in one year I would win on Centre Court I would tell you you are joking,” said Medvedev, who kissed the grass of Centre Court to celebrate his victory.

He later added in his press conference: “First of all, it’s my first Grand Slam win. So even I guess if I didn’t beat Stan, it would be one of the biggest wins in my life.

“My first top-10 win. I have no words to describe this. I guess this memory will be with me forever.”

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Wimbledon: Genie Bouchard in 'state of shock' after first round exit to Carla Suarez Navarro

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Struggling: Genie Bouchard.

Eugenie Bouchard was in a “state of shock” after her 1-6, 6-1, 6-1 first round defeat to 25th-seeded Carla Suarez Navarro and admits her 2017 season continues to be a “struggle”.

Bouchard made a strong start against the Spaniard but says nerves crept into her mind, forcing her to lose concentration and allow Suarez Navarro to up her game.

The Canadian former world No5 lost in the opening round in all three grass tournaments she has played and has dropped to 11-14 win-loss on the season.

The ex-Wimbledon runner-up was visibly disappointed with her defeat and is yet to realise how much it would take her to get over it.

“I don’t know. I think I need it to settle in before I even know kind of what’s going on. I’m still kind of in a state of shock right now,” said Bouchard after the 89-minute defeat.

“I don’t know what kind of loss this will be, will it be one of those hard ones or not. Probably because it’s Wimbledon.

“It’s just so unfortunate that as soon as I started feeling like myself again (in Madrid in May), I started playing well, I had a setback. I got an injury (right ankle) and ever since my injury I still haven’t felt like I’ve had that good form like I had in the past, so you know I just don’t have quite the same feeling on the court as I had, I guess that will take more time and more practice to get back to it.”

Bouchard has had a rough year and even decided to go back to the ITF circuit to get some wins, and didn’t walk away with the title there. She then strung together a couple of good wins in Madrid, where she beat Alize Cornet, Maria Sharapova, and Angelique Kerber en route to the quarter-finals.

She then suffered an ankle injury that hampered the rest of her clay season.

The 23-year-old admits the lack of victories this season has attributed to her dip in level against Suarez Navarro on Monday.

Marching on: Carla Suarez Navarro.

Marching on: Carla Suarez Navarro.

“I think that’s a little bit of it. I haven’t played a lot of matches this year, haven’t had a lot of wins this year. I had momentum and felt myself lose it and I couldn’t get it back. With more match play I feel I have more match toughness and I was definitely feeling like I was lacking that today,” said Bouchard.

She added: “Having the injury, not practicing enough, still being hesitant to move, seeing everyone slip on these courts and kind of being terrified to move is one thing, and when I’m not physically 100 per cent that affects my game.

“My game is athletic, I like to move, I like to take the ball early, I can also run down a lot of balls, so if I’m not 100 per cent physically that affects my whole game and it affects my confidence as well.”

Bouchard, who is next scheduled for some exhibition matches before playing the tournament in Washington D.C., concedes the past seven months have been rough.

Asked if she was enjoying tennis at the moment, she said: “This year has definitely been a struggle. I felt like I enjoyed it at some moments and it felt really tough at other moments. Recently obviously it’s been a struggle, can’t deny that. You just always got to have faith that after some low moments there has to be some ups coming soon, so just keep thinking that.”

She says she is working with a sports psychologist, as she has done in the past, but admits there’s a lot of work she has to do herself in order to find her way back to form.

“Yes I have (worked with a sports psychologist before), I work with one now, I think a lot of athletes do. I think it’s a good tool if it helps. But you still have to work on yourself and it’s all about you and your head. I could have done a better job out there today for sure,” she said.

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