Cricket World Cup 2019: Defiant Bangladesh go down fighting against Australia

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David Warner and Mushfiqur Rahim both hit tons in Nottingham.

David Warner showed flashes of his belligerent best with 166 from 147 balls as Australia moved to the top of the World Cup standings with a 48-run victory over Bangladesh.

Uncharacteristically restrained since returning from a 12-month ban for his role in the ball-tampering saga, Warner was again occasionally watchful in reaching his second three-figure score of the tournament before cutting loose.

Dropped on 10 in an innings containing 14 fours and five sixes, Warner’s stands of 121 and 192 with Aaron Finch and Usman Khawaja respectively formed the backbone of Australia’s 381 for five at Trent Bridge, where Bangladesh were unable to mount another national-record run chase.

The Tigers had overhauled 322 with seven wickets and more than eight overs to spare against the West Indies on Monday but, despite boisterous support, they fell short here on 333-8.

It was not for the lack of trying, though, as Mushfiqur Rahim produced a defiant 102 not out while Tamim Iqbal and Mahmudullah also produced significant contributions in an ultimately fruitless cause.

Bangladesh’s hopes of progression to the semi-finals have therefore been left on a knife edge following a third loss but Australia’s fifth win in six matches leaves them well placed to get to the knockout stages.

Fortune seemed to be smiling on them as Finch won the toss in the tournament for the first time, and Australia’s captain and Warner continued to flourish in a partnership that stretched beyond 50 for a fifth time in six innings.

Warner, though, was unconvincing early on and was given a reprieve after slashing Mashrafe Mortaza to backward point, where Sabbir Rahman put down a difficult low chance diving to his right.

It would prove a costly drop as Warner hooked Mustafizur Rahman for six before a more authoritative slog sweep off Shakib Al Hasan produced the same result as he and the more assured Finch moved to half-centuries.

It was a surprise when Finch departed for 53, perhaps taken aback by the extra bounce of Soumya Sarkar and guiding a cut straight into the hands of Rubel Hossain in the gully region.

For a period thereafter, both Warner and Khawaja eschewed risk, progressing serenely by routinely rotating the strike. Indeed, Warner’s second fifty contained only three fours as he reached three figures off 110 balls.

There was a sense the pair should have upped the tempo sooner but, after Khawaja moved unobtrusively to a run-a-ball fifty, Warner reverse-swept Shakib for four before depositing the spinner high into the stands for six.

Warner’s acceleration took him to the top of the tournament run charts and its highest score but, with a double ton on the horizon, an uppercut off Soumya failed to clear Rubel at short third man.

At 310-5, Glenn Maxwell was given licence to tee off and he duly did, clearing the ropes three times in an entertaining cameo of 32 off 10 balls before being run out following a mix-up with Khawaja, who then fell for 89 after becoming Soumya’s third victim.

Nevertheless, in conceding 131 from the final 10 overs, in part due to some ineffective bowling and poor fielding, Bangladesh were faced with a tournament-record chase.

It began in inauspicious circumstances when Finch threw down Soumya’s stumps following some miscommunication with Tamim, but had the Bangladesh opener dived then he may have made his ground.

Shakib’s previous four innings had yielded two fifties and two centuries but he was dismissed for 41, his lowest score of the tournament, after a leading edge from a Marcus Stoinis off-cutter went straight to Warner at mid-off.

Tamim seemed primed to anchor the chase but inside-edged Mitchell Starc on to his stumps for 62, leaving the defiant Mushfiqur and Mahmudullah, who put on 127, to carry on Bangladesh’s charge.

They had only five runs fewer than Australia did at the 40-over stage before Mahmudullah thumped Adam Zampa for two sixes in three balls en route to a 41-ball half-century, eventually holing out for 69.

The Asian side lacked the consistent firepower of their opponents in the closing stages but Mushfiqur had the consolation of going to his hundred off 95 balls in the penultimate over.

Provided by Press Association Sport

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Cricket World Cup 2019: Mohammad Hafeez backs Pakistan to bounce back after dismal show

Waseem Ahmed 20/06/2019
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Pakistan veteran Mohammad Hafeez said the men in green are determined to fight for a spot in the 2019 World Cup semis after being hurt by their dismal show in the tournament.

Sarfraz Ahmed’s side are just above bottom placed Afghanistan after winning one game so far and are in need of a miracle to make it to the last-four.

The 1992 champions need to win their remaining four games and require other results to go their way external in order to qualify for the knockout phase.

Fellow strugglers South Africa will be the next team to challenge Pakistan and Hafeez believes that his team is determined to stage a come-back.

“I tell you that to see the team at number nine is hurting all of us,” Hafeez, whose 84 anchored Pakistan’s innings of 348-8 in their only win over England, was quoted as saying by AFP.

Pakistan have lost to Australia and India to go with their humiliating defeat to West Indies in their first game. They will be hoping to win against New Zealand, Bangladesh and Afghanistan that follow the crucial tie against the Proteas.

“We failed collectively as a team,” said Hafeez. “We could not produce a team effort and individual brilliance did not help us either. In cricket these days, you need a team performance.”

“We can’t blame any single person. Everyone is responsible for failing to deliver,” added the 38-year-old, who said harsh media criticism after their heavy defeat against India on Sunday had been tough on the players.

“All of us are also hurt by the negative campaign in the media where players and their families were targeted. There was talk of groupings (factions) in the team which was wrong.

“Why don’t you talk about such things when the team is winning?”

Hafeez said despite the perilous situation, all is not lost for Pakistan.

“All is not finished for us,” he said. “We are focused on our next game and we are eager to win that match. We had ample time after the India game to regroup for a new beginning.”

Prime Minister Imran Khan – who led Pakistan to their 1992 World Cup win – had urged his team to bat first against India. But Pakistan sent India to bat first and suffered a comprehensive defeat. Hafeez supported his team’s decision.

“It was a team decision and that cannot be made on what someone has tweeted. It was the team’s decision. We didn’t bowl well and that’s why we lost that game,” he said.

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Cricket World Cup 2019: David Warner sends warning with record ton against Bangladesh

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There are fewer sights in modern day cricket more breathtaking than David Warner smashing the white ball all over the pitch. Trent Bridge was witness to yet another spectacular innings by the 32-year-old that oozed with class and charisma.

Warner’s second ton of the 2019 Cricket World Cup powered Australia to a highly competitive total of 381 runs against a resilient Bangadesh side.

We take a deeper look at his knock.

ANALYSIS

Runs: 166

Balls: 147

Fours: 14

Sixes: 5

Striker rate: 112.93

30-SECOND REPORT

After Aaron Finch’s monstrous innings against Sri Lanka, it was Warner’s chance to flex his batting muscles on a batsman-friendly pitch at the Trent Bridge. The southpaw smashed 14 fours and five sixes enroute to a swashbuckling 166 off just 147 balls. Warner was part of a 121-run partnership with Finch and a mega 192-run partnership with Usman Khawaja.

He built his innings smartly, playing the role of the sheet-anchor and later that of slogger at the death. By the end of his mammoth innings, Warner led the charts for top run-getters (447) and most runs in a single innings (166) in the 2019 World Cup.

GOT RIGHT

Warner has received some criticism for a few ‘slow’ innings in the tournament so far. Against India, the 32-year-old took 84 balls to reach 56 runs. His century against Pakistan also arrived at a strike-rate of less than 100.

On Thursday, Warner took 54 balls to reach his fifty and 56 more to reach his century. In the next 37 balls, the opener smashed 66 runs. While Finch and Khawaja provided good support, Warner’s well-paced innings was the primary reason Australia reached a mammoth total of 381-5.

The 32-year-old paced his innings according to the need of the team and when it looked like the defending champions were on course for decent total, he cut loose and went after the likes of Shakib Al Hasan and Rubel Hossain.

GOT WRONG

Not many negatives can be spoken about after such a majestic innings. But if one were to nit-pick, the manner in which Warner struggled to get going until the 38th over could have been an issue.

With 12 overs to go, Warner was on 119 from 127 and the total on 230-1. Warner and Khawaja kicked on with a flurry of boundaries but up until that time, even a total of 350 looked beyond Australia.

Verdict 9/10

The hybrid of sheet-anchor Warner and slogger Warner rose to the occasion and powered Australia to yet another 300+ score.

Warner’s slow innings against India and Pakistan were a result of his inability to answer Jasprit Bumrah and Mohammad Amir’s strong opening spells. But his daddy hundred against Bangladesh was a case of a well-paced innings. He thus became the first player in World Cup history to post two 150-pus scores.

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