England recall Keaton Jennings, drop 'fit' Ben Foakes for third Test against West Indies

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Keaton Jennings.

England have decided to recall Keaton Jennings in place of dropped wicketkeeper Ben Foakes while including injury doubt Ben Stokes in a 12-man squad for the final Test against the West Indies.

Jennings was axed for last week’s 10-wicket defeat in Antigua but will return at the first time of asking, leaving Foakes in the cold and Jonny Bairstow to reclaim the gloves.

Foakes had been struggling with a bruised hand but was passed fit for the match at St Lucia’s Daren Sammy Stadium.

Stokes has been suffering from a bruised right heel but trained with the team on the eve of the Test and will be assessed before a final decision is made on his involvement in the morning. If England decide not to risk the all-rounder Sam Curran will keep his place, with paceman Mark Wood set to play regardless.

England’s selection over the course of the series has betrayed muddled thinking, with the U-turn on Jennings and the seemingly harsh treatment of Foakes merely the latest example.

Stuart Broad was left out of the opener in Bridgetown, a pitch seemingly made for his style of bowling, Joe Denly was installed as an opener last week despite not having done the job at county level since 2015, Adil Rashid played the first Test and was then allowed to return home as surplus to requirements while Chris Woakes has travelled without being fit for any of the three Tests and Wood was not even part of the initial touring party.

Foakes’ ousting is a particularly eye-catching decision. He scored a fine century in his maiden Test innings in Galle, having come into the side as an injury replacement for Bairstow, and finished as man of the series in the 3-0 whitewash against Sri Lanka.

He has been less guilty of poor strokeplay than most of the top seven since landing in the Caribbean and, with a batting average of 41.50 from his first 10 innings, might wonder quite what he has done wrong.

The decision to go back to Jennings, who has had all of two net sessions since being removed for the second time in his England career, probably lies in his eagerness to bat at the top of the order.

Too many of England’s impressive strokeplayers are best suited to lower middle-order roles, artificially promoted by necessity rather than aptitude.

Bairstow, having regained the wicketkeeping role he treasures, has filled in there for the last three matches but will now drop back to six or seven.

As for Stokes, England will need to balance their reliance on him as an all-action cricketer – able to bat in the top five, bowl quickly and tirelessly and field brilliantly – with a duty of care.

With a World Cup and an Ashes series still to come in 2019, pushing him to the limit in the last match of a surrendered series might not be the pragmatic solution.

“He’s an integral part of all three formats and has been for some time now. He gives you great balance across the board,” said captain Joe Root.

“As we’ve seen in the recent past when he’s not been around it can make a huge difference. Of course we want Ben fit and firing and ready to go as many times as possible. But it’s so important he is able to do his job properly.”

Root suggested the 77 overs Stokes has sent down in the first two Tests were the reason for his current predicament but did not dismiss suggestions he had stood on a rock during a fitness session on the beach.

“Whether it was before that or during that I’m not really sure to be honest,” said Root.

“It’s down to a huge amount of workload over the first two Tests. He woke up sore with his heel. We’ll see how he pulls up.”

Provided by Press Association Sport

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England spinner Jack Leach wants county pitches to offer more variety

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Jack Leach.

England spinner Jack Leach believes county cricket must offer a greater variety of pitches if it wants to breed players capable of succeeding all over the world.

Resounding defeats in the first two Tests against the West Indies have raised renewed questions about England’s red ball team, and specifically their ability to thrive in foreign conditions.

Those concerns were temporarily shelved earlier this winter following a 3-0 victory in Sri Lanka – with Leach’s left-arm spin to the fore – but they are firmly back on the agenda.

Leach plies his trade for Somerset on generous turning decks at Taunton and rates criticism about the amount of spin they take – Middlesex and Lancashire have made their objections clear in recent seasons – as indicative of a wider problem.

Head coach Trevor Bayliss and captain Joe Root were careful not to use the variable bounce at the Sir Vivian Richards’ Stadium as an excuse for last week’s 10-wicket defeat, but both made plain their dissatisfaction at the surface.

“We need to challenge people to be better at cricket rather than complain about pitches. I think the surface at Antigua, we’d have not come up against in county championship. That might not be possible,” said Leach, who has yet to feature in the series.

“For me, we need players to experience different surfaces. It’s important to change attitudes. That would strengthen our international teams in years to come.

“I think there probably isn’t (enough variety in England). We look at spinning pitches negatively but if it’s seaming around we’re not too bothered. That needs to be addressed, how they mark pitches.

“I don’t know if that comes from the top or the counties, but I think it’s a big thing.”

England’s batsmen have been pilloried for lacking patience in the Caribbean, their counter-attacking style coming off badly in comparison to the studied diligence of Kraigg Brathwaite and Darren Bravo.

Leach hints that could also be an ingrained quality, with the prevalence of seam-friendly, green pitches in the domestic game making crease occupation a rare skill.

“There’s very few times where you spend 150 overs in the field and it’s a batting paradise,” he noted.

“So as much as I think spinning pitches are important, I think playing on flat ones is too. You can’t do things you haven’t practised before.”

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From Ajmal's magic to Johnson's terror, a look at England's Test series whitewashes

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Mitchell Johnson.

England go into the third Test against a resurgent West Indies looking to avert a 3-0 clean sweep in St Lucia.

They have only been on the wrong end of a clean sweep eight times in their history, in series involving three matches or more, with three of those coming in the 21st century.

Here, Press Association Sport looks back at the most recent whitewashes against England.

2013/14 – Australia 5 England 0

The end of the road for the most successful England side in recent memory, who were ruthlessly shredded in grim revenge for their memorable success in 2010/11 series Down Under. Inspired by a career-best series from paceman Mitchell Johnson, Australia took no prisoners on a tour that came with a heavy price. It was the last time the brilliant but divisive Kevin Pietersen would be seen wearing the Three Lions, the conclusion of Andy Flower’s time as team director, Graeme Swann retired mid-series and Jonathan Trott’s anxiety issues flared up publicly for the first time.

2011/12 – Pakistan 3 England 0

Saeej Ajmal.

Saeej Ajmal.

England arrived in the United Arab Emirates as the number one team in the world, the apex of Andrew Strauss’ achievements as captain. But they proved unable to tailor their tactics or their talent to their opponent’s adopted home in the desert. England’s misjudgements were apparent when they started the series with just one spinner, an error exposed by the fact Saeed Ajmal and Abdur Rehman ended the campaign with a combined 34 wickets. The failures in batting hit a low when they were bowled out for 72 chasing 145 in Abu Dhabi, and not a single batsman averaged 30.

2006/07 – Australia 5 England 0

The first 5-0 scoreline in the Ashes since 1921 and a crushing blow for those who had hoped for a sequel to the unforgettable scenes 18 months earlier, when England regained the urn for the first time in 18 years. With captain Michael Vaughan unfit, Andrew Flintoff stepped up to lead the side into what became a massacre. Steve Harmison’s opening ball of the series, a huge wide to first slip, is still remembered for setting the tone but this was an Australia side loaded with wounded greats hell-bent on setting the record straight. Glenn McGrath, Shane Warne, Justin Langer and Damien Martyn all retired after doing so in style.

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